first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The Defense Department would be required to prepare force structure plans and an infrastructure assessment that could be used to determine the level of excess capacity in DOD, according to the conference report for the fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill released Tuesday.The bill language does not directly link the analysis to a justification for a new BRAC round, but a summary acknowledges that a new capacity study is needed in light of the department’s repeated requests to hold a new round of base closures.“The conferees are mindful of DOD concerns that excess basing capacity is a financial drag on the department,” according to a summary from the House Armed Services Committee.“They are also cognizant of the fact that the most recent capacity survey is more than a decade old, does not reflect the impacts or cost of the most recent BRAC round, and does not account for the probable future force posture. The NDAA proposal directs a new capacity study that reflects the current threat profile and makes conservative assumptions about future end strength,” the summary states.The final bill language closely follows a provision in the House version, which directs the department to include the capacity study with its FY 2017 budget request and calls for it to submit:force structure plans for each of the services;an assessment of the probable threats to national security;end strength levels and major military force units;an inventory of worldwide installations;a description of the infrastructure necessary to support the force structure plans;a discussion of categories of excess infrastructure and infrastructure capacity; andan assessment of the value of retaining certain excess infrastructure to accommodate contingency, mobilization and surge requirements.The bill also directs the Government Accountability Office to review the force structure plans and infrastructure inventory within 60 days after it is submitted by DOD.As expected, the compromise version of the annual defense policy measure retains the prohibition against holding a new BRAC round included in the House and Senate versions of the legislation, a view reinforced in the committee summary.“Conferees are concerned that once an asset is lost through the BRAC process, it can never be regained, or is prohibitively expensive to replace. Hence, they are deeply skeptical that BRAC is in the country’s national security interest,” it states.The text of the conference report and a summary are available on the committee website.last_img read more

first_img Tech Industry 9:40 AT&T 5G network has some of the fastest speeds we’ve… Samsung, LG, Motorola: How soon can we expect 5G phones? Ericsson pledged last year to invest in the “accelerated build out of 5G” in the United States. Washington has banned Huawei, one of the major makers of 5G gear, from the US market, creating opportunity for other suppliers. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai applauded Ericsson’s announcement.”Building 5G equipment in the United States is good for our economy, good for the supply chain, and good for the rapid rollout of the next generation of wireless connectivity in the United States,” he said.Ericsson didn’t give a location for the factory but said it would employ about 100 people. The factory itself will make use of 5G technology for fast, responsive networking that will aid in automation in its warehouses and on its assembly line.The company didn’t immediately respond to a request for further comment.  Earlier this year, CNET got an early look at some tiny 5G antennas that Ericsson was experimenting with. This is a 5G small cell at Verizon’s 5G lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Jon Skillings/CNET Ericsson said Wednesday that it plans to open a factory next year in the US to build 5G gear as the next-generation wireless technology moves toward the mainstream. The factory will produce 5G radios, the element in phones and other devices that sends and receives the 5G signal, for use in urban areas. It also will make Advanced Antenna System radios that it said are components for large-scale deployments of 4G and 5G networks.5G, the next generation of cellular technology, offers faster speeds and lower latency between devices. Carriers like Verizon and AT&T in the US, Telstra in Australia and EE in Britain are just now starting to establish 5G mobile networks in a handful of big cities. Tags Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice 13 Photos Comment 1 5G AT&T Ericsson Verizonlast_img read more

first_imgMap of ChuadangaAt least 10 BNP leaders and activists were injured in a clash with police in front of Kedarganj BNP office in Chuadanga on Saturday morning.Witnesses said BNP leaders and activists started to gather in front of the BNP office in the morning to observe their 40th founding anniversary.When they tried to bring out a rally around 11:30am police obstructed them, which triggered a clash between the two sides.At one stage, police charged baton on the BNP men to disperse them.When additional police super Md Kalimullah rushed to the spot along with additional force the BNP men fled the scene.Haji Rabiul Haque Bablu, member convener committee of district unit BNP, claimed that police charged baton on their peaceful rally which left 10 BNP men injured.last_img read more

first_imgFrench Foreign Affairs minister Jean Yves Le Drian looks on during a NATO Foreign Ministers meeting at the NATO headquarters in Brussels on 4 December 2018. Photo: AFPThe French government on Sunday urged Donald Trump not to interfere in French politics after the US president posted tweets about the protests rocking the country and attacked the Paris climate agreement.”We do not take domestic American politics into account and we want that to be reciprocated,” foreign minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told LCI television.”I say this to Donald Trump and the French president says it too: leave our nation be.”Trump had on Saturday posted two tweets referring to the “yellow vest” anti-government protests that have swept France since mid-November and sparked rioting in Paris.”Very sad day & night in Paris. Maybe it’s time to end the ridiculous and extremely expensive Paris Agreement and return money back to the people in the form of lower taxes?” he suggested.Trump had earlier posted: “The Paris Agreement isn’t working out so well for Paris. Protests and riots all over France.”People do not want to pay large sums of money, much to third world countries (that are questionably run), in order to maybe protect the environment. Chanting ‘We Want Trump!’ Love France.”Earlier this week Trump retweeted one of several posts falsely claiming that French protesters were chanting his name.The videos that have been used to support this claim were in fact filmed at a far-right protest in London earlier this year.The protests in France are not directly linked to the Paris climate agreement which was signed in 2015 and has since been abandoned by Trump, to the dismay of French president Emmanuel Macron and other Western leaders.Spurred by rising fuel prices — in part due to tax hikes aimed at helping France shift to a lower-carbon economy — the “yellow vest” protests have grown into a broad movement against Macron’s policies and governing style.- ‘Don’t insult my country’ -Other French politicians have also responded angrily to Trump’s latest tweets, including a lawmaker from Macron’s party who dubbed the US leader “Donald the Senile”.”DON’T INSULT MY COUNTRY DOTARD,” Joachim Son-Forget posted, employing an antiquated insult previously used against Trump by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.Trump had weighed in on the protests in previous tweets, deploring the “large and violent French protests”.Despite their differences — Macron is a 40-year-old centrist and Trump a 72-year-old rightwinger — the French and US leaders initially enjoyed warm ties.But relations have soured in recent months, not least over Trump’s rejection of the climate agreement and hard-fought Iran nuclear deal.Last month a fresh row blew up after Macron gave an interview calling for a “European army” and arguing that Europe needed to be more independent from the US in its defence policy.Macron is further thought to have riled the US president during commemorations marking the end of World War I when the French leader took aim at Trump-style nationalism in his speech.Le Drian, like other members of the government, stressed that Macron wanted a dialogue with the protesters and would offer solutions when he addresses the nation early next week.”I think his remarks will be strong enough for the movement to halt, or at least for the hooligans to be put off,” the foreign minister said.He expressed concern over remarks among some protesters calling for an “insurrection” in France.”As foreign minister I travel around the world and I know — you can witness it in certain countries — how fragile democracy is,” Le Drian said.”I hear people saying, ‘This is an insurrection’. That is not the republic I know.”last_img read more

first_img In this new effort, the researchers sought to extend prior research done by Thomas Ebbesen and colleagues in 1998 where it was discovered that holes, made in a metal sheet that were smaller than the wavelength of light shone on it, allowed more light to pass through than expected—a property that has come to be known as extraordinary optical transmission. Subsequent research found the principle did not apply to sound waves due to rigid parts of the barrier reflecting back most of the applied sound. The researchers on this new team suspected that altering certain aspects of the barrier might allow for the property to hold for sound after all.They began by drilling several holes (10 millimeters in diameter) in a 5-millimeter -thick piece of metal. Next, they placed a speaker on one side of the “wall” and a microphone on the other. With just the holes, they found the wall blocked sound almost as effectively as if there were no holes drilled in it. Next, they covered one side of the wall with a thin tensioned membrane (plastic wrap). After playing the sound again, the researchers discovered that the addition of the membrane allowed much more sound to pass through the wall—on average 80 percent more—almost as if the wall weren’t there at all.The membrane, the team explains, allows for “zero resistance” as the sound encounters the holes. At the resonance frequency of the membrane (1200 hertz), air moved in the holes as if it had no mass at all. That in turn allowed sound waves to move through very quickly. The sound in the holes was actually concentrated as it passed through, suggesting that the technique might be used as a way to magnify small signals. One application of this discovery could be walls that serve as security barriers. More information: Giant Acoustic Concentration by Extraordinary Transmission in Zero-Mass Metamaterials, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 244302 (2013) prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v110/i24/e244302AbstractWe demonstrate 97%, 89%, and 76% transmission of sound amplitude in air through walls perforated with subwavelength holes of areal coverage fractions 0.10, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively, producing 94-, 950-, and 5700-fold intensity enhancements therein. This remarkable level of extraordinary acoustic transmission is achieved with thin tensioned circular membranes, making the mass of the air in the holes effectively vanish. Imaging the pressure field confirms incident-angle independent transmission, thus realizing a bona fide invisible wall. Applications include high-resolution acoustic sensing. New experiment helps explain extraordinary optical transmission Journal information: Physical Review Letters Citation: Researchers discover way to allow 80 percent of sound to pass through walls (2013, June 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-percent-walls.html © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in Korea has discovered a way to allow sound to pass through walls almost as if they were not there at all. As the group describes in their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the technique involves drilling very small holes in a wall and then tightly covering them with a thin sheet of plastic. Credit: Oula Lehtinen/Wikipedia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more