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27Feb/21

Dell Announces Expanded Vostro Portfolio Designed for Small Business Professionals

first_imgDell Technologies World 2019 is upon us, followed closely by National Small Business Week, making it the perfect time to announce the launch of the latest additions to our Vostro portfolio, the Vostro 13 5000 and Vostro 15 7000, designed with the needs of small businesses in mind.Michael Dell founded Dell Technologies in his college dorm room with a revolutionary idea and a great deal of dedication and hard work. These are key ingredients that company founders must possess to start – and successfully grow – a small business. Here at Dell, we understand the challenges facing small businesses today and have built our products and advisory services to enable them to scale, thrive and remain a competitive force in the marketplace, starting with our Vostro line.This is why we are thrilled to launch our new Vostros. The Vostro 13 5000 is the thinnest and lightest Vostro ever, designed for on-the-go business professionals. This portable 13” notebook is just 14.9mm thin with a weight as light as 1.18kg (2.6lb) and is encased in an aluminum cover that is both durable and sleek. The FHD display is surrounded by a 3-sided narrow border, which was made possible with the new 2.7mm HD webcam. While the HD camera provides a clear viewing experience, Waves MaxxAudio Pro boosts volume and SmartByte software ensures video-conferencing applications receive network bandwidth priority to reduce buffering, making it the perfect laptop for on-the-go business professionals who need to attend meetings from anywhere.To add to the lineup, the Vostro 15 7000 is our newest 15” laptop catered to professionals who need a high-performance computer that looks stylish, while keeping cost down. Encased in aluminum and featuring a narrow border FHD display, it is both durable and sleek. With up to Core i7 Intel Coffee Lake-H 6-core processors, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 graphics, a 97 WHr battery and an optional triple drive expandability storage option, this performance laptop is ideal for content creators or businesses that run intensive applications and need plenty of storage & performance when working on large projects.Vostro laptops come with security features that are easy to use for any business user. With an optional single-sign on fingerprint reader and built-in hardware-based Trusted Platform Module (TPM 2.0) security chip, users can instantly authenticate their systems and feel confident their data is well protected against malware and cyber threats.Dell also knows that small businesses rely on their technology partners for continued support. Therefore, we are offering the option of Dell Pro Support, which provides our customers with 24×7 direct telephone access to advanced-level technicians who are locally based relative to each small business.Small businesses play an incredible part in the nation’s economic growth and that does not go unrecognized. According to the Association for Enterprise Opportunity (AEO), micro businesses make up 92 percent of all U.S. businesses. As we head into the Small Business Administration’s National Small Business Week, on May 5, a special time when we celebrate the impact of small businesses nationally, we’re excited to kick it off with new Vostros designed to enable and empower small businesses and entrepreneurs.The Vostro 13 5000 will be available on dell.com on May 16 starting at $849. The Vostro 15 7000 will be available on dell.com on May 16 starting at $1149.last_img read more

27Feb/21

Five Ways to Accelerate Your Data Analytics Journey

first_imgYou’ve been collecting great data, yet how much of it falls on the virtual floor? Most organizations can capture data from the Internet of Things, corporate systems, social media and other sources, but haven’t quite mastered turning that data into business value. This is a point underscored in a new report from Prowess Consulting that is focused on accelerating the data analytics journey.“Your organization is awash in data, arriving from different sources, in different formats, and destined for different uses,” the report notes. “And most data is never analyzed or used.”On the upside, Prowess notes that organizations do want to take full advantage of all their data by putting sophisticated analytics and artificial intelligence to work to extract valuable business insights from all those bits and bytes. But how do you get there?A good first step is to start with this report, sponsored by Dell EMC and Intel®. In the report, Prowess offers straightforward guidance on five overarching steps your organization can take to gain more value from all that data piling up on your enterprise and cloud servers.Here’s a quick version of the story.1. Take a holistic view of your data lifecycle.Step back and look at your whole data lifecycle, from creation to archiving. Think in terms of optimizing across the continuum, beginning at the edge, where data is created, and reaching all the way to the end, to the archival stage.2. Focus on optimizing data early in its lifecycle.Take control of data starting at its point of origin, from remote cameras, the Internet of Things and more. As much as possible, compress it, shape it and process it before bringing it into your system. This front-end work can reduce the amount of data you need to transmit, store, protect and archive.3. Rethink staging.Think differently about server memory and storage, because Intel® Optane™ technology may be able to bridge those two worlds. For example, you can now put large amounts of non-volatile data on the memory bus right by the processor. Rather than thinking about storing data, think about pre-positioning it to get it in the right place and the right format and on the right media.4. Create a scalable, flexible infrastructure for analytics and AI.Don’t wed yourself to a particular framework or algorithm. And don’t get stuck with hardware that can do only one thing. Break down the infrastructure and analytics silos. Build cloud-like, multipurpose, HPC infrastructure that can run AI workloads alongside other workloads.5. Prepare for AI and ML everywhere.Think of AI as a valuable tool for optimizing data across your business. Use intelligent edge devices to preprocess data using pattern matching. Use AI to identify suspicious traffic in your network. Don’t think of AI as a destination for your data at the end of its lifecycle. Think about AI being everywhere.Moving forwardDell EMC and Intel offers solutions for each step in the process of accelerating your data analytics journey. These offerings extend from intelligent edge devices to PowerEdge servers to new Dell EMC Ready Solutions for HPC and AI that provide all the hardware, software and services you need to get a deep learning solution up and running quickly. The Prowess report highlights many of these offerings, and explains how you can put them to use to accelerate your data analytics journey.To learn moreFor the full story, read the Prowess white paper “Accelerating Your Data Analytics Journey.”Be part of the Intel® AI Builders ecosystem of industry leading independent software vendors, system integrators, original equipment manufacturers, and enterprise end users who have a shared mission to accelerate the adoption of artificial intelligence across Intel platforms.Join the conversation @dellemcserverslast_img read more

27Feb/21

An Overview of the EMEA Sales Graduate Program

first_imgIncremental changes can determine sizable progress. This key phrase summarizes Dell’s milestones in a nutshell — from a dorm room to a multinational company. At first, the mantra “Technology that enables human progress” might seem like it centers on automation and machinery as progress-drivers. But it revolves around people, those who develop technology solutions, and those who use them. The incremental changes in any domain start with people, as they are the enablers of transformation and the driving force behind improvement.Dell Technologies believes development programs are critical to its growth strategy, which is why the company invests in graduate programs around the world that are destined to maximize the potential of young people with a passion for technology. The success of the programs has exceeded all expectations, with the EMEA region surpassing the global target of 25 percent for hiring.The Foundation of the EMEA Sales Graduate Program: All About TrainingThe EMEA Sales Graduate Program kicked off in 2016 and since then has hired and trained 238 grads from 21 different countries.In the midst of workforce transformation, Dell Technologies’ graduate training is specifically tailored to reflect these changes. As a result, grads become fully knowledgeable about the Dell Technologies portfolio, as well as the company’s culture code within the first few months. It’s not just about amassing as much information about laptops and servers as possible, it is also about honing a proactive attitude, building rapport, establishing the right customer etiquette, improving presentation skills and acquiring all the other global skills that are necessary to any work environment. Ty Chan, one of the Cherrywood, Ireland-based sales graduates, even likened his initial experience at Dell Technologies to college life: “A lot of learning and asking questions but I am delighted that I have so much support from my team which allows me to grow!”In an effort to foster a collaborative environment, the EMEA Sales Graduate program holds two face-to-face events per year where graduates from all across the region meet up and learn from each other. Graduates are divided into groups and assigned projects per team based on their interests and strengths. Many of these projects go past the conceptual stage and are materialized within the company, one such example being the EMEA Online Platform Communication Special Project. The team in charge of this special project aimed to streamline the internal communication process and proposed a new internal communication platform to be adopted by Dell Technologies employees everywhere.Future Expectations at DellThe company’s 2020 achievement of hiring 25 percent of all external hires as graduates ensures that the company moves forward with the best, well-grounded talent on board. By identifying the most promising candidates and equipping them with the right tools to succeed, the program aims to kickstart novel careers in the IT industry and to support each individual development story.The company also vouches to balance out the gender ratio at Dell, not only within the Graduate Program but outside of it as well. Maintaining a gender ratio of 50 percent is an aspect that is controlled and considered at point of hire. Empowerment is more than just a buzzword to attract and recruit. Empowerment can be found in the goals of the company, in the steps taken to give leadership a female voice, and in the opportunities that Dell creates for its employees. Soufiane El Hachimi, a sales graduate from Casablanca, Morocco shares how the cumulative importance that Dell Technologies places on its employees shaped his perspective on the overall grad experience: “The fact that Dell Technologies invests in us with onboarding sessions, trainings, and F2F events was impressive and motivated me to do my best, to be more productive and useful as fast as I could.”The Outcome: Diversity, Drive, and DedicationIn a technology-driven world, people are still at the centre of everything. Therefore, the heart of this program is the human interaction through which ideas are shared and connections are made. Dell Technologies has built a collaborative work environment where diversity is celebrated, drive is rewarded and dedication is recognized. “I have never experienced such a warm and welcoming culture that made me soon realize that this work is my ‘happy place,’” exclaimed Pavla Fejfarkova, a Prague, Czech Republic-based graduate who summarized her experience within the company so far. Facilitating interaction between tech-aficionados and allowing them to exchange ideas is what made these meet-ups a success. We have discovered through them that interconnectivity is key, especially between generations. With the help of more experienced employees, Dell graduates not only become adept at their jobs in a short span of time, but they also receive incentive to succeed. As Madalina Ormenisan, sales graduate from the Glasgow, Scotland office states, “it is a real fortune to have had the chance to meet various great leaders who are contributing to making Dell Technologies such a successful company.” The transfer of knowledge goes both ways, as through the Graduate Program, we have also developed a Reverse Mentoring program in which young grads help other Dell employees learn the tricks of the social media trade.Through the EMEA Sales Graduate program, Dell Technologies continues opening up new avenues and paving the way for digitalization.To learn more about the program, visit our homepage here.last_img read more

08Feb/21

Fed stresses its commitment to low rates as economy stumbles

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve pledged on Wednesday to keep its low interest rate policies in place even well after the economy has sustained a recovery from the viral pandemic. The Fed said in a Thastatement after its latest policy meeting that the improvement in the economy and job market has slowed in recent months, particularly in industries affected by the raging pandemic. Fed officials kept their benchmark short-term rate pegged near zero and said they would keep buying Treasury and mortgage bonds to restrain longer-term borrowing rates and support the economylast_img read more

08Feb/21

Biden team pitches US on big virus aid as Senate starts work

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Senators launched an all-night vote session laying groundwork on President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief package, as the White House is increasingly focused on selling the plan directly to voters. Biden’s administration has done 60-plus interviews with national TV and radio shows. There have been spots on local TV news and briefings last week with more than 50 groups. One of the main goals is to stop people from getting bogged down in the tangle of partisan deal-making and convince them that every penny of the $1.9 trillion package is needed. Senators are voting on a budget resolution to set the contours of the final bill. One provision seeks to limit which Americans will qualify for $1,400 direct payments.last_img read more

26Jan/21

O’Connell talks television

first_imgContent will continue to be the most important aspect in the future of the rapidly changing television industry, Katie O’Connell told students in a lecture Monday night. O’Connell, senior vice president of drama development for NBC, graduated from Notre Dame in 1991 and has experience as an executive producer for NBC and CBS. She has also worked on major television shows such as 30 Rock, 24 and Law and Order. “Content will always be king,” she said. “Television is changing so rapidly, so the biggest piece of advice I can give you is to be on top of it.” Many of the students who attended O’Connell’s lecture were Film, Television and Theatre majors. She said they were lucky because that major did not exist when she was a student at Notre Dame. She graduated with a degree in American Studies. O’Connell began her lecture by describing the many different types of jobs that are available in the television industry today, including careers with networks, as managers and agents or as members of television shows’ creative teams. She discussed the most well-known jobs in the industry, but also encouraged students to explore lesser-known jobs. Students should save their money if they plan to move to Los Angeles, O’Connell said, as it is difficult to find a steady income in the field of television. O’Connell concluded the lecture with her thoughts on the future of television. She said the television business was moving toward becoming entirely digital, and mentioned the newly available online rentals of Apple and Amazon. “Work with the architects of change,” she said. O’Connell said although the transition into a more digital version of television may not occur in the next five years, but it will happen in the lifetime of today’s college students.last_img read more

26Jan/21

Seniors weigh options for class Legacy Fund options

first_imgAfter sifting through hundreds of suggestions from Notre Dame seniors, the final options for the Class of 2011 Legacy Fund focus on helping students who are in need of financial assistance. Each year, the Student Development Committee (SDC) chooses a few ideas for the fund and the senior class votes on them and chooses where they would like their donations to go. There are five choices this year, and the voting began about a week ago and will most likely extend until Wednesday, said SDC Co-Chairs Maggie Nettesheim and Maria Sellers. “Something we definitely thought about a lot is that we wanted it to be something that would continue to make a difference on campus,” Nettesheim said. “We wanted it to be something that would improve life on campus and would continue to do so.” This year’s choices focus on providing funds for students who are in need of financial aid for a variety of occasions. The first option is a study abroad assistance fund. This program would be designed for students on financial aid who wish to go to abroad, Nettesheim said. “If they choose to go abroad, it would give them a little more spending money,” Nettesheim said. The second choice is a partial tuition scholarship for incoming freshmen each year. Seniors’ third option is a stipend for students who would like to do summer service, but aren’t sure where their funds would come from. “The summer service one would be a fund for those who want to do service, international or national, but they don’t have funds for where they’re living,” Sellers said. Nettesheim said it would be particularly useful for students who do not feel they could give up a summer income, and it could apply to any service endeavor, even if it’s not through Notre Dame. The fourth choice is an emergency assistance fund. This money could be used at the discretion of rectors in the event of an emergency, such as a death in the family of a student who is unable to cover the price of a plane ticket home. The last option is a donation to RecSports, which would allow for the purchase of new uniforms or equipment. SDC used multiple sources to gauge where the seniors wanted the fund to go to, including booths at senior events and an online poll. Nettesheim said this year’s senior class was very enthusiastic in contributing ideas. “We got probably 200 suggestions from the senior class when we did the online poll,” Nettesheim said. “We in the committee then narrowed it down from those suggestions.” The final outcome of the vote will most likely be announced in December. Tim Ponisciak, the assistant director of the Annual Fund, said the Senior Legacy Fund can generate anywhere from $60,000 to $100,000. Contributing to the Senior Legacy is the first step into the Annual Fund, which is a general fund that accepts donations to support “virtually everything under the Dome,” such as financial aid for students or advancing Notre Dame’s Catholic mission, according to its website. “In the spring we’ll send out a letter and brochure telling them about the sponsored fund, but also telling them a little about the Annual Fund,” Ponisciak said. Ponisciak said seniors are encouraged to contribute to the sponsored legacy fund, but they are also welcome to make a donation to any other fund at Notre Dame. “For a senior to participate in the legacy they don’t have to give to the sponsored fund,” Ponisciak said. “They can participate in another aspect of campus that they feel strongly about.” Although it is targeted toward the current seniors, other members of the Notre Dame community can contribute to the legacy as well. “Through the phone center, we call their parents to see if the parents want to give on their behalf,” Nettesheim said. “Also, that fund stays in existence. Any alumni really could donate.” For Nettesheim, the Senior Legacy Fund is important because it gives seniors the opportunity to give back to the University that gave so much to them. “I think most of us leave Notre Dame feeling like it’s been the best four years of our lives,” Nettesheim said. “And if you can get seniors exciting about giving back to the university and start that commitment early then I think that’s great.”last_img read more

26Jan/21

Community members discuss student safety

first_imgLeaders from South Bend and local colleges discussed student safety and the relationship between the city and schools at a Community/Campus Advisory Coalition meeting Wednesday. Mark Kramer, owner of Kramer Properties, which provides housing to many local college students including those at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, said four larcenies occurred last weekend amid Blue-Gold Game festivities. “[Larcenies have] really been happening in the last two or three weeks, I guess,” Kramer said. “The students need to warn their fellow students to keep their laptops out of sight or out of the car … It can happen anywhere.” Student body president Brett Rocheleau said student government has sent emails to the student body about protecting themselves from theft. “In our Good Neighbor Guides that we give out to everyone at the beginning of the year, we’re going to add a whole section about staying safe,” he said. “Things like lock your door, don’t think you’re safe all the time and fall into that false sense of security.” Mike Carrington of the South Bend Alcoholic Beverage Board said students often host large off-campus parties this time of year because the weather becomes nice. He said excise and local police can become involved in these situations. “It’s possible to come out with a bus and take everybody to jail, and we’re not advocating for that,” he said. “We want to avoid that … When somebody shows up [at a student party] and says, ‘Hey, you need to turn it down and close it down,’ they need to understand that they need to do that.” Carrington said underage students who enter bars using fake identification cards are jeopardizing themselves and the business owners. “If [students] want to have good places to go to and have them be safe and good places, then we need to have the cooperation of those [owners] and … them not being inundated with students trying to get in with false IDs,” he said. St. Joseph County Sheriff Michael Grzegorek said cooperation between local colleges and the city has been “fantastic” recently. Jeffrey Walters, Uniform Division chief for the South Bend Police, said his department was pleased with the relationship that has developed over the past few years between South Bend residents and college administrators, students and faculty. “We’ve solved a lot of problems and I’m happy to report that we don’t have a whole lot of issues right now,” he said.last_img read more

26Jan/21

Panel encourages reform of civil society

first_imgPartisan politics went under the microscope Monday evening as the Center for Social Concerns (CSC) hosted the first event in a series of seminars, titled “From Battleground to Common Ground,” featuring an interdisciplinary analysis of the state of American political discourse. Rosie McDowell, director of International Community-Based Learning Outreach at the CSC and organizer of the discussion panel said the CSC wants to focus its efforts this year on encouraging civic engagement. “The CSC theme for the year urges active participation in civil society according to individual talents, visions and vocations,” McDowell said. English professor John Duffy said American civil society is in a state of crisis. “We are at a time in our public discourse where there is no agreement on fact, no criteria for expression of language, how to govern or decide what is appropriate or how to use similes, metaphors and other figures of speech,” Duffy said.  “Nor do we save a place for deliberative discourse, where participants can acknowledge uncertainty and that they might be wrong … Instead what we see are assertions and counter-assertions hurled back and forth – that is what I consider the crisis of public argument.” Duffy said the public discourse has created a charged atmosphere. “Toxic public rhetoric is a fact of everyday life,” Duffy said.  “It is a form of entertainment, it is a corporate product that is bought and sold.” Political science and peace studies professor David Philpott said this toxicity is emblematic of the increased polarization in American politics. “Polarization technically does not mean nastiness, it means that opinions are distributed far to the left and to the right,” Philopott said.  “Whatever [explanation] one likes, it is clear that our political discourse has gotten nastier and far more mean spirited.” Philpott said clearly drawing the line between religion and politics has become only more complicated in the modern civil discourse. “Much liberal enlightenment is premised on the idea that good politics is secular politics … and making an appeal to religion is problematic,” Philpott said.  “But, secularism can be highly divisive as well; nastiness is hardly confined to the religious, it’s found among religious and secular alike.” In this atmosphere, the challenge to maintain an open mind has only intensified, Philpott said. “Another proposal is to maintain a healthy sense of doubt and skepticism… too often the virtue of doubt is made only to the position the recommender does not find persuasive, not to the recommender’s own position,” Philpott said. Margaret Pfeil, professor of theology, said Pope John XXIII’s encyclical Pacem in Terris suggests a framework capable of building a more balanced discourse.  This document reflects the attitudes Pope John XXIII exhibited during his lifetime, she said. “Pope John XXIII acted as an intermediary speaking with both [former leader of the Soviet Union Nikita] Khrushchev and the Kennedy administration during the height of the conflict,” Pfeil said.  “In this situation he gave primary importance to the dignity of each person involved rather than to the ideological issues at stake … this enabled him to win even Khrushchev’s trust because Khrushchev knew that he respected the dignity of all of the Soviet citizens, of all the citizens of the world.” This universal respect allows for cross-factional discourse, she said. “John XXIII’s appeal to peace through respect for human dignity offers room for common dialogue … it might be asked whose voices are heard [in the dialogue], and if there are elements of truth and participation in determining the common good,” Pfeil said.  “This is something to consider as we mark the anniversary of September 11th [Tuesday], what it would look like for love to reign instead of fear.” Philpott said acknowledgement of universal dignity will be a necessary component to any solution. “The broader restoration of the right relationship requires the struggle that respects the dignity of the opponent and seeks to find what is right to her own position, to perhaps amount to a fuller synthesis of justice,” Philpott said. A less caustic political climate will develop when the rhetoric used to engage politically changes, Duffy said.  “I think virtuous discourse has to start in other settings … our politics are so deeply compromised that this will not be possible until there is a popular movement for a better kind of language, and until we model that language we won’t get it from the people who inhabit our public spaces,” Duffy said. Educators and students are responsible for modeling this type of ethical discourse, Duffy said. “In a sense this is a very deep existential crisis that we have, that there is no agreement on fact … this is something we have to work at,” Duffy said. “I was once bemoaning to myself that I don’t know if this was possible or not, but my wife said you wouldn’t be in education if you really believed that.  I think education is where you begin, we need to look very hard at the way we understand our communicative practices.” Duffy said the Notre Dame community is the perfect place to enact this change. “Our task is to pursue knowledge, to ask deep questions,” Duffy said.  “We live a life not all that different from the students in Plato’s academy: incredibly privileged.  The change has to come from people like us who have these opportunities and the capacity to share and spread them.”   Contact Nicole Michels at nmichels@nd.edulast_img read more

26Jan/21

College hosts younger siblings

first_imgSaint Mary’s College welcomed a variety of young faces to campus to celebrate Little Sibs Weekend with several days of circus-themed activities. “I brought my brother to Little Sibs last year, and I really wanted to be a part of it this year,” sophomore Chloe Derank, co-chair of Special Events for the Residence Hall Association (RHA), said. “I was reading ‘Water for Elephants,’ and I was like, ‘We should have a circus!’ and that’s what we ended up picking.” The weekend was an opportunity for Saint Mary’s students to share their campus with younger siblings and relatives, including spending a night in the residence halls. Events began with registration at 5 p.m. on Friday, where participants received a t-shirt that displayed the circus theme. The group ate s’mores and played board games in Regina Friday evening, Derank said. Derank said Saturday’s circus in Regina North Lounge drew the largest crowd. She estimated about 120 siblings showed up, accompanied by around 75 Saint Mary’s hosts. “From 9 [a.m.] to 12 [p.m.] we had a circus with a bunch of different games, and [the siblings] could get prizes and snacks,” Derank said. “We had this game called ‘Spray Away’ … and I think that was probably the biggest hit.” Sophomore Kaitie Maierhofer coordinated “Spray Away,” a game that allowed the younger siblings to squirt water at her. She also hosted her own siblings for the weekend. “‘Spray Away’ went really well,” she said. “I don’t know if [the siblings] enjoyed squirting me or the balls more, but it worked out.” Other attractions included magic shows, a temporary-tattoo parlor, a photo booth and slushies, first-year Maureen Hutchinson, fellow RHA Special Events co-chair, said. In the afternoon, siblings had the opportunity to make their own Chex Mix and color Easter-themed coloring pictures for arts and crafts, Hutchinson said. After, the group visited Dance Marathon, a dance-themed fundraiser for Riley Hospital for Children in the Angela Athletic Facility. “We did a scavenger hunt through there with [the siblings], and got to see all the fun stuff,” Derank said. Saturday’s activities concluded with an evening showing of the DreamWorks picture “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted.” The weekend ended Sunday morning with an obstacle course for the siblings to play on. “It was really fun,” Maierhofer said. “In my personal experience, [it was] better than last year. My sister had more fun this year than she did last year.” Derank said her participation in last year’s event inspired her to become involved with planning this year’s weekend. “A lot of the ideas for things came from Pinterest,” Hutchinson said. “The crafts [especially].” Little Sibs Weekend accommodated visitors ranging from around one year old to 18 years old, Derank said. “I think we did a pretty good job [of entertaining with that age range],” she said. “I think the circus was able to do that a lot.” Maierhofer said she and her sister enjoyed the flexibility of the weekend. “It works out well, knowing that you can do all of the activities, or just have your sibling come out and just [enjoy the weekend] with them,” Maierhofer said. Despite the inevitable stress involved with planning, Derank and Hutchinson said they felt the success of the weekend was worth it. “The best part was a little kid, probably 3 or 4, [getting] his T-shirt at registration,” Derank said. “His sister held up the shirt … and he got so excited because there was a circus animal on it … and that was just the best moment.”last_img read more