first_imgProjects being identified in Liberia and other countriesThe Department of Field Support at the United Nations has announced that ten new contributors (Albania, Bangladesh, Canada, Italy, Luxembourg, Nigeria, Pakistan, Portugal, Sri Lanka and Switzerland) have committed to provide contributions to the Trust Fund in Support of Victims of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse.These countries join Bhutan, Cyprus, India, Japan and Norway, which have already contributed to the Trust Fund.These contributions reinforce the Secretary-General’s clear commitment to putting the rights and dignity of victims first.With the most recent contributions, the total amount available to the Trust Fund from voluntary contributions by member states will rise to approximately US$1.5 million. This includes US$102,000 that have been made available from withheld payments to troop and police contributors as a result of substantiated allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse.Projects to provide specialized services for victims and to strengthen community-based complaint reception networks will be implemented in the Democratic Republic of Congo using the funds. Other projects are being identified in Central African Republic, Liberia and Haiti.Under Secretary General for Field Support Mr Atul Khare expressed his deep gratitude to those who have contributed, stating “the interest in the Trust Fund in Support of Victims of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse is a powerful indication of the vital support and partnership of the member states in this critical area. We encourage all member states to consider making a donation.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgAn intelligence-led operation by the Law Enforcement and Investigation Division (LEID) of the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) resulted in a large quantity of uncustomed alcohol being confiscated at a location on the East Coast Demerara on Tuesday.The seized goods, which included about 50 cases of assorted uncustomed foreign alcoholic beverages, has a revenue value of approximately $6 million. One person was arrested and subsequently put on station bail.The GRA on Friday said it has been relentless in its pursuit of smugglers, acting inA quantity of the alcohol seized by GRA’s Law Enforcement and Investigation Divisionaccordance with the law. Once caught, perpetrators and accomplices can be fined up to three times the value of smuggled items in addition to the items being seized.It added that it will continue to put systems in place to ensure its enforcement activities are enhanced.last_img read more

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Only a 49ers season this maddening could make Sunday’s victory so tough to secure, even after parlaying George Kittle’s 210 receiving yards into a 20-0 halftime lead.Their eventual 20-14 win over the Denver Broncos did not hinder the 49ers’ position atop next year’s draft board, and it certainly provided a morale boost for a flailing franchise that had lost its past three and 10 of 12 before Sunday’s stunner.This game will be remembered for Kittle’s first-half outburst, even …last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest I look forward to them every year — the stories from visits to Ohio Century Farms.In my estimation, taking a couple of hours to step back in time to the earliest days of Ohio agriculture is time vastly better spent compared to watching any reality television, soap opera or televised sporting event that can be conjured up. And, the stories are real — not a statement that applies to reality television.Seriously, there could be some really good “based upon actual events” movies made from Century Farm stories that were instrumental in shaping the state’s top economic driver today. The stories of these seldom-noticed gems of Ohio history are sitting right under our noses and are vastly more entertaining, informative and incredible than the most dynamic sporting matchup or even a hotly debated interview with a man who decided he wanted to be a lady.The Ohio Century Farm program started in 1993 as a joint effort between the Ohio History Connection, Ohio’s Country Journal and the Ohio Department of Agriculture. As you read the stories, take a few moments to put into perspective what these people actually did to make a new life on an Ohio farm. It is truly amazing to think about leaving everything you have known behind to hop on a ship and carve out a life for yourself and your descendants amid the some harshest conditions imaginable. They left what they knew for a chance of success in the unknown. Put yourself in their well-traveled shoes. Would you do it? Could you do it?My guess is that most people in our modern society would have a pretty tough time matching the determination, grit and work ethic of the founders of these farms who — let’s face it — had to be half crazy to do what they did. What drove them to seek out such hardship and sacrifice? What gave them the strength to carry on?Without fail, every Century Farm has a story that offers a perspective that seems to be increasingly rare in today’s society. The Blausey family farm started out in the middle of a terrible swamp that few others were determined enough to inhabit. The Good-Woodruff Farm has its roots in an incredible love story that spanned an ocean and defied the conventions of the day.These stories are fascinating to hear in person and I hope their value and the perspective they offer comes through the pages of this publication. Hopefully you get the chance to let these stories take you to a time and place that offers stark contrasts to our modern lives.Think about how our forefathers lived. Even once they settled on the farms after daunting journeys to get there, there was drama in simply surviving from one day to the next through most of their lives. Food didn’t come from a take out window or a store — it came from the garden and the barn and the cellar. They didn’t need to seek entertainment via the remote control or a trip to the movie theater. They lived real life movies against the elements every day. They faced head on the struggles of life and death, love and loss, heat and cold, and rain and shine that we have been working hard to insulate ourselves from ever since. They toiled endlessly because their very survival depended upon it.After hearing the arduous tales of Century Farms, it never fails to make me appreciate all that we have today a little bit more. We are incredibly fortunate that our ancestors worked so hard to create better lives for their children. Now we get to enjoy the fruits of their labor and hopefully we can heed the lessons they teach us that are more valuable than anything that can be learned on reality TV.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With milk check butterfat values currently in the $2.50 to $2.70 per pound range and nearly a dollar more than protein, butterfat is where it’s at in terms of dairy producer income today.A high oleic soybean variety that was tested recently at Penn State University for its dairy nutrition applications showed a surprisingly significant impact on raising the milkfat percentage. There was no impact on milk volume or other components and only a slight increase in dry matter intake, which resulted in no effect on feed efficiency in terms of energy-corrected milk.With butterfat doubling in value to average $2.30 per pound over the past three years, a 0.2% increase in butterfat for an 80-pound dairy herd could mean 35 cents per hundredweight to the milk check under normal marketing conditions when milk volume and other components are unchanged.Through a check-off grant from the Pennsylvania Soybean Board, Alexander Hristov, Ph.D., PAS, Penn State professor of dairy nutrition, led a project to evaluate dairy ration performance of three soybean meal sources: conventional, high linoleic extruded soybean meal; extruded Plenish (DuPont Pioneer) high oleic soybean meal; and whole, heated Plenish high oleic soybeans. High oleic soybeans have been grown commercially in the United States for five seasons, and are grown in Pennsylvania and 11 other states.The study was done with extruded soybean meal versus conventional solvent extraction because more of the soybean oil is retained with the extrusion process. Substituting the extruded Plenish variety soybean meal for conventional extruded soybean meal requires no adjustment in dairy rations, according to the study.“We were surprised with such an obvious (0.2%) milkfat percentage increase. The mechanism we think is taking place is the higher level of oleic fatty acids in the Plenish high oleic soybeans versus linoleic fatty acids in the conventional soybeans, and a reduction in the already small level of trans fatty acids in milk,” Hristov said.Not only did the high oleic variety raise milk butterfat content over conventional soybean meal, it changed the composition of the milkfat. The increase in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and some significant decreases in trans fatty acids in the milk are noteworthy for consumers.“The 17% reduction in trans fatty acids is significant,” Hristov said. “These are the harmful fatty acids consumers want to avoid and it went from 3.36% of the total percentage of milkfat to 2.80% in the Plenish diets. Even though those levels of trans fatty acids are relatively low in milk to begin with, the Plenish diets still decreased them further, which is beneficial.“If soybean growers grow more high oleic beans versus conventional because it benefits human food products more, there will be more soymeal going into animal feed with this profile. But the benefits are only realized if the residual fat is in the soymeal (via extrusion or whole roasting). Although this wasn’t studied, it can be assumed that the benefit is close to zero if solvent extraction processes are used versus extrusion.”Hristov describes the research and findings in his paper published in the September 2015 Journal of Dairy Science. The report is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2015-9786.last_img read more

first_imgLaveesh BhandariThis Budget needed to get a grip on inflation, accelerate growth, restore trust in the government and build confidence in the economy. It does a bit of all, but only tentatively. In a word, the Budget is disappointing: Much talk and a lot of small measures, but little to,Laveesh BhandariThis Budget needed to get a grip on inflation, accelerate growth, restore trust in the government and build confidence in the economy. It does a bit of all, but only tentatively. In a word, the Budget is disappointing: Much talk and a lot of small measures, but little to show by way of major initiatives. It seems the team of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Finance Minister Arun Jaitley has decided to wait it out till next year by when the NDA Government would have greater experience. India is looking for a grand vision, and actions to go with it. We need leaders at the helm who have conviction and are not afraid to take bold decisions. Such leaders would have convinced us that this is the time to chart a new path for India to shape a great future for our children. Instead, we have got a budget put together by people unwilling to take hard decisions. They may have tried to please all or displease none. But all they have achieved is more of the same, with some extra bits thrown in here and there.Charting a reform pathJaitley’s Budget speech and statements do, refreshingly, identify the direction of reform we can expect in the coming years. It grants that getting the manufacturing sector back on track requires a more credible financial regulator,basic labour reform that ensures flexibility for the employer as well as protection for the worker, skill development and access to basic finance for the small and medium entrepreneur (SME).At the same time, the Budget recognises that India needs to change the regime defined by APMC (Agricultural Produce Market Committee) acts and give the farmer unhindered access to markets anywhere in the country.The recognition that publicprivate partnerships are not delivering and need to be reoriented is welcome.Combine this with improved access to finance for SMEs, including addressing the issue of insolvency law, and we get a clear outline of the direction NDAintends to take the economy in.advertisementRating: GoodSetting inflated targetsThe Budget aims for very high growth in tax revenue in an economy that is not growing very rapidly. At the same time,budgeted expenditures are not as high as one would normally expect in a drought year. Based on this, it manufactures a fiscal deficit target of 4.1 per cent for 2014-15, which it will no doubt fail to achieve-the figure will instead be around 4.6 per cent by the end of the year. It seems that Jaitley’s predecessor P.Chidambaram,with all his numerical skullduggery, is still lurking somewhere in the background. Numbers aside, the Budget also lacks a clear action plan to correct the problem of burgeoning subsidies. India’s subsidy regime, which is aimed at benefiting households, needs to be changed-from incentivising consumption to encouraging investment, and from focusing on leakage-prone items to those that can be better targeted. But we see none of this in this Budget. Neither do we see any change in the subsidy regime that is oriented towards the productive sector-say for the farmer or the SME entrepreneur- but is not very effective.Rating: BadInadequate reform of PSUsAlarge chunk of the Government’s assets is locked up in an unproductive public sector. Therefore, a comprehensive set of public sector reforms combined with large-scale privatisation and disinvestment would have been great. Instead,we will get about Rs 58,000 crore from disinvestment this fiscal. This is a good move but could have been better had some thought gone into what all would be possible to disinvest easily. Both internal and external security have received higher allocations, which is a good step since these have been ignored for years.Greater focus on the North-east was long due and is, thus, laudable.Yet, there was much more that needed to be done in these areas and we can only hope that this is just the start.Rating: AverageWhat lies ahead?The Government has tried to do a little of many things in this Budget and decided against going for big-bang announcements. But then this is a relatively inexperienced team and, perhaps, Modi and Jaitley are giving themselves and their team more time to get better at their jobs. In which case,we have to wait for Budget 2015-16, when they could come out all guns blazing on reforms.Let’s hope it is so.Laveesh BhandariEconomist and head, Indicus AnalyticsTo read more, get your copy of India Today here.last_img read more

first_img Carlos Amezcua Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News Tags: Decision 2018 FacebookTwitter Carlos Amezcua, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsMonday, Carlos Amezcua met with Omar Passons in studio to discuss the upcoming election and the San Diego County Supervisor position.Omar Passons is an attorney and youth advocate seeking to replace termed-out Ron Roberts as the 4th District representative. Updated: 10:57 PMcenter_img Posted: May 14, 2018 Race for San Diego County Supervisor May 14, 2018last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee handed over CESC Shrishti Samman to noted writer Manishankar Mukherjee, popularly known as Shankar, at the inaugural session of the International Kolkata Book Fair organised by the Booksellers’ and Publishers’ Guild on Thursday afternoon.Born in December 1933 at Bongaon, Shankar was the neighbour of Bibhutibhusan Bandopadhyay, author of Pather Panchali. His father Haripada Mukherji moved to Howrah shortly before the second World War, which is where the formative years of the well-known author began. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedFollowing the untimely death of his father in 1947, began the writer’s difficult journey as a street-vendor and then a typewriter cleaner. He was a temporary teacher at Vivekananda Institution and later found a job in a jute broker’s office. In 1951, Shankar met Noel Frederick Barwell, the last British member of the Bar-of-England practising in India. He became his last clerk. In 1954, following the death of Barwell, the author started writing his first book, which was serialised as Kata Ajanare. There has been no looking back for him since and he continues to command an enviable readership in India and abroad. The range of Shankar’s writing is astonishing, from fiction, short story, memoirs and travelogues to his enormously popular books on Vivekananda. One of his biggest best-sellers Chowringhee has been translated in many languages across the world, including English, French, Russian, Italian, Spanish and Chinese. Shankar also enjoys a vast readership in India and Bangladesh across many languages.last_img read more

first_imgPunter found hiding in bushes Police search for missing woman Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailPolice are investigating after a 58-year-old woman died in an accident on the A500. Emergency services were called to the collision, which involved grey Kia and a blue tractor near Barthomley, shortly before 10pm last night. Nothing could be done to save the woman, who was driving the car, and she was pronounced dead at the scene. The road was closed for several hours before reopening at around 4.20am this morning (Friday January 4) Cheshire Police are investigating the collision and are asking anyone with information or dashcam footage to contact them. A spokesman said: “Sadly the driver of the car – a 58-year-old local woman – died at the scene. “Her next of kin have been informed and are being supported by specialist officers. The driver of the tractor was uninjured.” Read MorePolice step up patrols as youths cause anti-social behaviour in town “Enquiries in relation to the incident are ongoing and officers are keen to hear from anyone who witnessed the collision or has any information or dashcam footage which may aid the investigation.” Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service said they sent fire engines from Crewe and Alsager to the scene after being called at 9.56pm. A spokeswoman said: “On arrival crews discovered that the collision involved a car and a tractor. “Police closed the road in both directions as emergency services worked at the scene. Firefighters assisted in removing a woman from the car. They also made the vehicle safe. “Sadly the woman died at the scene.” Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive Anyone with information should call Cheshire Police on 101 quoting incident IML 285839. They can also contact the force here and submit dashcam footage here. To pass on information anonymously call Crimestoppers, an independent charity, on 0800 555 111. Want to tell us about something going on where you live? Let us know – Tweet us @SOTLive or message us on our Facebook page . And if you have pictures to share, tag us on Instagram at StokeonTrentLive .center_img Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Driver named following fatal collisionlast_img read more