first_imgTURIN, Italy (AP):Paulo Dybala outshone his more famous compatriot Lionel Messi by scoring two goals to help Juventus beat Barcelona 3-0 in the first leg of their Champions League quarter-final yesterday.The result will give Juventus plenty of confidence heading into the second leg on April 19, but they will be wary of another fantastic comeback from Barcelona, who beat Paris Saint-Germain 6-1 in their last match to become the first team to overturn a 4-0 first-leg loss in the history of the competition.The other first-leg match between Borussia Dortmund and Monaco was called off and rescheduled for today after three explosions went off near the German team’s bus as it set off for the match, injuring defender Marc Bartra.INSTANT RECOVERYIn Turin, Juventus were aggressive from the start and almost scored in the third minute when Gonzalo Higuain’s header from a free kick taken by Miralem Pjanic was dropped by Marc-Andre ter Stegen, but the Barcelona goalkeeper recovered in time.However, the hosts did take the lead four minutes later when Juan Cuadrado pulled a cross back from the right flank for Dybala to curl the ball into the bottom left corner.Messi was largely kept quiet all night, but he provided a superb ball over the top for Andres Iniesta, whose effort was turned around the right post by Juventus goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon.That save proved pivotal as Juventus doubled their lead moments later when Mario Mandzukic’s cross was deflected to Dybala, who drove a first-time shot into the left of the goal in the 22nd minute.Barcelona thought they had pulled a goal back on the half hour, but Messi’s strike was ruled out as Luis Suarez had strayed offside.Juventus had several chances to extend their lead and finally did so in the 55th minute when Giorgio Chiellini headed in a corner off the inside of the left post.Suarez almost got a crucial away goal for Barcelona in the 67th but his effort hit the outside of the left post.last_img read more

first_imgWASHINGTON – President George W. Bush’s 2007 budget proposes spending more than $2.7 trillion, showering big increases on defense and homeland security and a smattering of other favored programs such as scientific research, education and energy. At the same time, Bush’s blueprint being submitted to Congress today proposes shrinking or eliminating 141 programs while trimming $36 billion from Medicare over the next five years. The plan for the budget year that will begin Oct. 1 lays out a path to achieving two of the president’s chief domestic goals: making his first-term tax cuts permanent – they are set to expire after 2010 – and cutting the deficit in half by 2009, the year Bush will leave office. Details about the plan come from public statements, such as Bush’s State of the Union address last week, and interviews with officials familiar with the budget proposal who spoke on condition of anonymity because they did not want to pre-empt the president’s announcement today. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card The budget’s arrival on Capitol Hill will set off months of intense debate, made even more contentious by congressional elections in November, when Democrats hope to wrest congressional control from the Republicans. While Congress is expected to reshape Bush’s proposals significantly, Republicans voiced support for the blueprint’s objectives. “The American people know that our government’s too big and it spends too much, and they expect Congress to do something about it,” newly elected House Majority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio, said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Senate Budget Committee Chairman Judd Gregg, R-N.H., said that the administration’s proposal to trim Medicare is a “toe in the water” in the effort to get the costs of programs like Social Security and Medicare under control before 78 million baby boomers begin to retire. “The big issue is entitlement reform, and the fact that they are proceeding in that direction is a good thing to hear,” he said. Democrats sought to portray Bush’s budget as an election-year campaign document rather than an honest effort to deal with exploding deficits. The budget proposal’s release comes only weeks before the national debt will hit the current limit of $8.18 trillion, requiring Congress to vote for an increase to keep the government operating. “This budget is just detached from reality,” Sen. Kent Conrad of North Dakota, the top Democrat on the Senate Budget Committee, said in an interview Sunday. “The debt is exploding, and the president isn’t facing up to it.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more