first_img Login/Register With: A month of talks between SAG-AFTRA and the studios, represented by the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP), has failed to produce a deal. Citing “outrageous rollbacks,” the union’s national board on Sunday voted unanimously to send out strike authorization ballots to its members, the organization’s website indicates, unless a deal is reached by Friday, when the current contract expires. That last implies that talks are still continuing.The vote came after a report from the negotiating committee.In order to pass, a strike authorization vote would require a 75 percent yes vote from those voting. Even that would not necessarily mean a strike, but it would up the likelihood of one dramatically, since starting July 1, the union will be working without a contract. Advertisement Facebook Twittercenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgReaction has been pouring in on social media following a mass shooting late Sunday night where two people were killed and at least 12 others were injured in Toronto’s Greektown neighbourhood.The shooting happened near Danforth and Logan Ave. just after 10 p.m.Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders said early Monday that police arrived at the scene and quickly identified the suspect, who was armed with a handgun. An exchange of gunfire ensued, and Saunders said the 29-year-old shooter likely died of gunshot wounds. Advertisement Advertisement Many celebrities took to social media to react to the tragedy, with the hashtags #Danforth and #TorontoStrong.Canadian actor Patrick J. Adams wrote, “Another night of senseless loss and brutality in my home town.”Another night of senseless loss and brutality in my home town. Praying that some of these reported injuries from the shooting don’t turn into fatalities. Thank you to all the officers and doctors working hard tonight to deal with the aftermath. #danforth— Patrick J Adams (@halfadams) July 23, 2018Canadian actress Laura Vandervoort wrote, “Heart broken to hear about the #Danforth shooting this morning. My love and condolences to the victims and their families.”Another senseless shooting in my home town. Heart broken to hear about the #Danforth shooting this morning. My love and condolences to the victims and their families. Praying those injured are able to recover not only physically but emotionally. #toronto— Laura Vandervoort (@Vandiekins22) July 23, 2018Canadian actor Jay Baruchel wrote, “A few years ago I chose to move to the east end of Toronto, first to East York and then the beach. Every day I’ve been reminded why I made that choice. I truly love it here. What happened on the Danforth last night was ugly, opportunistic barbarism.”A few years ago I chose to move to the east end of Toronto, first to East York and then the beach. Every day I’ve been reminded why I made that choice. I truly love it here. What happened on the Danforth last night was ugly, opportunistic barbarism.Toronto can and will endure.— Jay Baruchel (@BaruchelNDG) July 23, 2018Canadian racing driver Robert Wickens wrote, “Something needs to change! My thoughts go out to all the victims.”Just got back to Indianapolis to read about what happened in Toronto tonight. Something needs to change! My thoughts go out to all the victims. Thank you to the emergency response staff for there hard work in trying to keep the fatality rate as low as possible tonight. #Danforth— Robert Wickens (@robertwickens) July 23, 2018Canadian former women’s ice hockey player Hayley Wickenheiser wrote, “Oh Toronto…  #Danforth.”Oh Toronto…??#Danforth— Hayley Wickenheiser (@wick_22) July 23, 2018Former Barenaked Ladies frontman wrote, “‘This is where we used to live.’ For 25 years. And it’s where my kids live. What an awful, violent year for Toronto. #Danforth.” Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

first_imgYoutube screengrabThe IIT-JEE has always been a source of nightmare for a majority of Indian students studying in classes 11 and 12. The intimidation they face as well as the pressure makes the teenagers want to run the other way.Clearing the JEE is the first step to get into the Indian Institute of Technology, which the most prestigious university in India.Surprisingly, Australian professors who took a look at the JEE question papers also called the questions “tricky and intimidating”.A video of Australian professors reacting to the questions went viral on social media, with the professors talking about how intimidating the questions were and that the test was literally a race against time. Six Australian professors, including two of Indian origin, were interviewed for the video, posted by a YouTuber, ‘Tibees’.In the video, a Chemistry professor, Dr James Hutchison, said that he will be surprised if a school going student will not find the questions intimidating since he found them slightly so. “I’d probably, you know, leave the exam room crying if I was in year 12 and I had to do this. Yeah, good luck, good luck,” he said.He added that the topics discussed in the examination are usually taught at the university level.Professor Barry Hughes, a mathematician, pointed out how answering the questions was a race against time. He also spoke about access to training for these types of examinations.”We all know that in any educational system if you go to a good school, well resourced, with the best teachers and so on like that, you expect a better outcome… But with these race-against-the-clock-style examinations, there’s a trade-off between the student’s ability in the subject, natural intelligence, and their having been trained to deal with examinations of this type,” he said. Other professors interviewed in the video said that most of the questions here depend on memorizing facts instead of applying concepts. They added that passing the test doesn’t necessarily mean they will turn out to be good engineers.last_img read more

first_imgMyanmar press freedom advocates and youth activists hold a demonstration demanding the freedom of two jailed Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo in Yangon. Photo: ReutersSeveral dozen people rallied in central Yangon on Sunday against the jailing of two Reuters journalists, lamenting the shrinking space for free expression in Myanmar despite the advent of civilian rule.Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 28, were sentenced two weeks ago to seven years behind bars under the Official Secrets Act.The judgement sent shockwaves through the country’s nascent community of journalists because it echoed life under the former junta, when the press was heavily censored and reporters routinely jailed.The ruling also sparked a global outcry against Myanmar’s army and against de facto civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi for failing to speak up for the pair.“We are very angry. We are disappointed in the new government. Shame on them,” activist Maung Saung Kha, 25, told AFP.“We condemn the sentence… they should be released.”Protesters released black balloons emblazoned with photos of the two jailed reporters.“The image of the country has been hurt by the court decision,” protester Thin Zar Shun Lei Yi added.While journalists have rallied to the reporters’ cause-some using the hashtag #arrestmetoo-the general public has been apathetic in its response to the verdict.The reporters were arrested in December while investigating the extra-judicial killing by security forces of 10 Rohingya men during last year’s military crackdown against the stateless Muslim minority.The incident was later acknowledged by the army.The UN says a campaign of widespread murder, rape and arson forced more than 700,000 Rohingya to flee over the border into Bangladesh.UN investigators say the violence merits the prosecution of top generals for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.Its rights arm is due to release the full findings of its investigation into the crackdown in coming days.The reporters will appeal against the verdict but the process will likely take many months, if not years.A presidential pardon is also a possibility.last_img read more

first_imgPeople eat street food in Dhaka on 18 April, 2019. Photo: Jung Da-minBangladesh is a very dynamic country with one of the world’s highest population densities of 1,015 per square kilometre for its 165 million people.The country’s largest city and capital Dhaka is a diverse city of vibrant culture, with thousands of Bangladeshi businesses and international corporations contributing to migration and population growth.The streets in Dhaka are always filled with cars and people passing by, giving the impression the city itself is always in motion.The heat of the capital does not turn off even at night, with many people still eating out, sitting and talking to each other on the streets.Visiting the dynamic city during the Bangladesh government’s week-long “Visit Bangladesh” tour programme for a group of journalists, academics and envoys in mid-April, this reporter found a chance for an interesting night out with a local friend, according to The Korea Times.The streets of Dhaka at night, lit with neon signs and lights from high buildings, were much darker compared to the bright streets of Seoul, but they were still lively with people moving around.People sit and talk outside in a street in Dhaka on 18 April, 2019. Photo: Jung Da-minAdvancing through the streets, this reporter found many people out, sitting around and talking to each other even after 10pm, South Korea’s one of the oldest English-language daily adds.A local friend and guide said it was normal for citizens to come home from work or school late at night and they like to chill out on the streets long after dark.Buildings of university campuses were also filled with people for late-night political party gatherings and discussions, and students gathered all around the campus.People sit and talk inside a building in the campus of University of Dhaka for political party gatherings and discussions.Dhaka street foodsMany people were also getting street food from vendors and small restaurants along the streets.Seen is a view of a street in motion in Dhaka at night after 10pm on 18 April. Photo: Jung Da-minAmong the various street foods, this reporter tried out a few different kinds: jhalmuri, chotpoti, fuchka, achars and coconut water.The taste of jhalmuri was not so unfamiliar but rather similar to that of ramen ― an instant noodle snack with spicy sauce easily found in Seoul.The popular Bangalee street food loved by people of all age groups was made with puffed rice, onions and green chilli, the Korean Times says.Chotpoti is one of the most popular street foods in Bangladesh made with peas, potatoes, chopped boiled eggs, cucumber, red onions and other vegetables with panipuri shells stuffed with them and tamarind paste and chaat masala on top.Fuchka is a slightly more condensed version of chotpoti and they usually are served together on one plate.The combination of crispy panipuri shells and mushy ingredients inside adds to the fun of eating, giving a unique mouthfeel.Achars are Bangladesh-style pickles made with different kinds of vegetables and fruit ― normally sour fruit ― mixed together and seasoned in oil.The one this reporter tried with local boiled rice was sweet and sour, similar to South Korean pickled plums.It is not too difficult to find coconut water in convenience stores in South Korea, but on the streets of Dhaka, you will get to drink from the coconut itself.As the coconuts are loaded at vendors in streets they are not as cool as those from a refrigerator, but are sweet enough to fill you with energy.last_img read more

first_imgRoshé Anthony, owner and director of the BEAT School of Makeup Artistry as well as founder of the Roshé Cosmetics line. (AFRO/Photo Roberto Alejandro)Anyone looking to enter the field of makeup artistry, or simply on the market for some great cosmetics, may want to look up Roshé Anthony.Anthony is the owner and director of the BEAT, or Beauty Expert Artistry Team, School of Makeup Artistry, located in Baltimore’s Charles Village neighborhood for the last nine years. Harnessing an extensive career in makeup artistry and sales, Anthony is helping to fill a vacancy left behind when the state of Maryland stopped regulating makeup artists, and stopped issuing state certification licenses about seven years ago.“That sort of upset a lot of people in the industry because it basically took away our credential,” said Anthony.That credential was important because it indicated to clients or employers that a makeup artist was properly trained.“At that time, we were administering licenses, but when they decided to stop regulating the makeup artistry, our certificate pretty much took the place of the license, and gained as much notoriety, or importance, or credibility as that [former] license,” said Anthony.BEAT offers a 40 hour program that ends in a makeup artistry certification. Because space at the school is limited, BEAT enrolls classes of six students at a time.“It’s a very intimate setting and within that setting they’re learning sanitation, they’re learning color theory, how to do basic facials so that they’re not just makeup artists, they also know how to consult the client as far as what they need to do to keep their skin healthy, and also to make proper recommendations for their skin,” Anthony said.Students learn about the different tools and techniques for applying makeup as well. The school also partners with fashion shows in the region so students can get some real world experience to put on their resumes as they head into the workforce.Because of BEAT’s success in preparing its students for employment, the state recently approved the school as an official occupational training provider under the federal Workforce Investment Act, making students who enroll eligible for assistance with the cost of the program, says Anthony. Interested applicants can get more information at their Local Workforce Investment Board One Stop Center, according to the Maryland Higher Education Commission website.In addition to the school, Anthony has also developed her own line of cosmetics and skincare products, Roshé Cosmetics. Anthony has been doing this for 12 years, and her line includes your standard items like shadows, lip glosses, and pencils.“With our skincare line, it’s a botanical skincare line. It’s really the heart of my brand because skincare is so important. . . . And once you care for [the skin] and help that client to be healthy in that way, then the makeup is more of an accessory as opposed to something that they need to cover up a problem that they may have,” said Anthony, whose products include cleansers, toners, moisturizers, special treatments for dead skin removal, masks, and scrubs.The Roshé Cosmetics line also contains products for men and teenagers interested in improving their skincare.Anyone interested in learning more about Roshé Cosmetics can do so at www.roshecosmetics.com, or by emailing Anthony at roshe@roshecosmetics.com.Anyone interested in learning more about the BEAT School of Makeup Artistry can call (443) 837-5609, or visit www.beatmakeupschool.com.ralejandro@afro.comlast_img read more

first_imgA teen charged with robbing another teen as he walked to pick up his cap and gown from Frederick Douglas high school in June, has been charged with the shooting of a 42 year-old Owings Mills man in July.Kyree Trimon Greene was charged with shooting a 42-year-old man in Maryland. (Photo/Baltimore City Police Department)Kyree Trimon Greene of the 2600 block of Francis Street in Baltimore’s Penn North, is charged with attempted first-degree murder and other charges for shooting the 42 year-old man in Baltimore County on July 17th.Greene who just turned 19, was charged prior in the botched robbery of a 17 year-old student going to pick up his cap and gown. The student told police someone stuck a gun to his back and tried to rob him. In the process, a struggle ensued and Greene accidently shot himself with the victim gaining control of the gun. Greene fled on foot and Baltimore Police did not know at that time if Greene was a student.  Using video surveillance, police later identified Greene as the suspect in that robbery.A quick search of the Maryland Case Search shows various charges for Greene in the Frederick Douglas robbery including Fire arm use, First and Second degree assault, reckless endangerment, and discharging a firearm.Greene is also charged in the shooting of another teen. A 16 year-old that was walking home with friends in Howard Park in May when a masked man opened fire hitting the teen in the thigh. Police later identified Greene as the shooter.According to Maryland Case Search, Greene has been charged with Attempted First and Second degree murder, First and Second Degree assault, Firearm on a minor and reckless endangerment as well as discharging a firearm.In the Owings Mills shooting that happened in July, police were called to Reisterstown Road and Pleasant Ridge Drive for a person shot multiple times. Police found a 42-year-old man.  The victim got out of his car to confront Greene when Greene made a U-turn in front of him, cutting him off. Greene then fired several shots at the victim.Greene was arrested in Baltimore, five days later according to case search. Officers near Druid Hill Park noticed Greene was armed and a chase ensued before he was caught.Greene is being held without bail in Baltimore.last_img read more

first_img Explore further This observation has led researchers to ask how evolution may have selected for personality variation within a species. A team from the UK has recently suggested a novel yet simple answer: that variation begets variation. They explain how there is no single ideal personality (as there is an ideal hand or eye, which we all share), but nature instead promotes different personalities.In their recent study, John McNamara, Philip Stephens, and Alasdair Houston from the University of Bristol, and Sasha Dall of the University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, explain how natural selection can prevent individuals in a species from evolving toward a single optimum personality, using a game theory scenario. In their study, the researchers focus on the evolution of trust and trustworthiness. The game scenario they use is a variant of the Prisoner’s Dilemma. First, Player 1 chooses to trust or not trust Player 2. Not trusting gives Player 1 a small payoff, and Player 2 gets nothing. If Player 1 trusts Player 2, and Player 2 is trustworthy, then both players receive the same medium-size payoff. But if Player 1 trusts Player 2, and Player 2 isn’t trustworthy, Player 1 receives nothing, and Player 2 receives the maximum pay-off. In other words, Player 1 takes a risk if choosing to trust Player 2.At this point, it seems that Player 2 should always choose to be untrustworthy, so that he always receives the maximum payoff. However, as in real life, the game is iterative. And – this is the important factor – Player 1 can do some background research on Player 2, and find out how often Player 2 has been trustworthy in the past. If Player 2 has a record of being untrustworthy, then Player 1 probably won’t trust him. This “social awareness” comes at a cost for Player 1, so Player 1 must decide if the cost is worth the information. If a population of Player 2’s has variation in its records of trustworthiness, then Player 1 could learn useful information by learning a Player 2’s history. (Realistic methods of acquiring information include, for example, talking to third parties or observing facial expression.) But if a Player 2 population generally has the same records, then the cost of social awareness wouldn’t be worthwhile for Player 1. Who you gonna trust? How power affects our faith in others In simulations with multiple players, individual patterns of trust and trustworthiness were allowed to evolve freely. By watching simulations of the game, the researchers found that the Player 2 population evolved variability in trustworthiness in response to sampling by the Player 1 population. For the Player 2 population, variation was the best strategy for gaining the trust of Player 1, and then exploiting that trust to maximize their pay-off on occasion. This variation, in turn, meant that Player 1 could gain helpful information by paying the cost of being socially aware – which, once again, provoked more variation in the Player 2 population. The researchers noted several interesting results of the game. If the Player 1 population was too trusting, the Player 2 population exploited that, and became less trustworthy. Dall said the team was pleasantly surprised by two results: that the model predicted behavioral variation in both player types, and also predicted two distinct variation patterns for Player 2’s behavior. “Not only were we able to explain why variation should be maintained as social interactions become more extensive, we were able to explain how discrete behavioral types might evolve in otherwise continuous behavioral traits,” Dall said to PhysOrg.com.As he elaborated, the presence of a few socially aware Player 1’s will not only keep the Player 2’s in check, but also allow for more variation among Player 1’s. “You only need a certain number of samplers to enforce trustworthy Player 2 behavior, and so there will be a limit to the numbers of samplers that will be maintained by selection. Once samplers are common enough, everyone else should adopt unconditional, cost-free Player 1 behavior.” In other words, some Player 1’s will always trust, while other Player 1’s will never trust one another.As the researchers concluded, even though this study focuses on a specific model, the general finding that variation begets variation in social contexts has broad implications for understanding evolution and game theory. Past results in game theory have discovered individual differences in trust and trustworthiness, and now studies like this one help to explain this variation. This study and others also show that evolutionary game theorists cannot ignore the importance of individual variation in their models. Meanwhile, the researchers will continue to investigate exactly why we have different personalities.“More generally, the question of ‘why personality variation evolves’ requires a more complex answer, which we’re only just starting to unravel as evolutionary biologists,” Dall said. “The chances are that there isn’t just one reason, and which particular reason is relevant depends on the context. So far, our social awareness reason is one of the few that has been proposed to explain variation in a cooperative context. Social awareness also appears to work in an aggressive context: individuals adopt consistent levels of aggression to avoid getting in real fights, since if someone can predict you’re going to be aggressive, they will avoid provoking you; individual differences arise via frequency dependence again, as the more aggression there is around you, the less you should bother fighting – this is the famous Hawk-Dove game outcome.”More information: McNamara, John M.; Stephens, Philip A.; Dall, Sasha R. X.; Houston, Alasdair I. “Evolution of trust and trustworthiness: social awareness favours personality differences.” Proceedings of the Royal Society, doi:10.1098/rspb.2008.1182.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — Although members of the same species share more than 99 percent of their genetic makeup, individuals often have small differences, such as in their appearance, susceptibility to disease, and life expectancy. Another difference, one that has gone overlooked from the evolutionary perspective, is personality variation. Even identical twins can have personality types at opposite ends of the spectrum.center_img The researchers performed simulations of the above game to understand how behavior variation evolves in a population. Player 1 (P1) chooses to trust or not trust Player 2 (P2). If trusted, P2 chooses to take advantage of P1 to gain a higher pay-off, or be trustworthy. The pay-off relation is 0 < s < r < 1. P1’s cost of sampling P2 is c, where 0 < c < s. Image credit: J. M. McNamara et al. ©2008 The Royal Society. Citation: Study Shows How We Evolved Different Personalities (2008, November 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-11-evolved-personalities.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more