first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea boss Lampard delivers new Kante updateby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard says N’Golo Kante could be back for their Champions League tie with Lille.Kante missed victory over Brighton yesterday with a hamstring strain.Lampard said, “I spoke to N’Golo about it and I didn’t want to take the risk. “He’s so important for us but it’s been difficult for him to get going because of the break-up of his pre-season, with his injury carried over from last season. It wasn’t right to risk it today but he could have a chance for Lille.” last_img read more

first_img“This was as a result of the driver failing to stop for Police on two occasions during which he drove in a dangerous manner and with no insurance! “The driver was arrested for a string of offences which occurred in the rural areas of Claudy and Park. “The driver was interviewed and has been charged to court for all offences and can explain his actions to the court.“Waterside NPT will continue to proactively patrol to keep the roads and your communities safe.” ShareTweet A MAN will soon face the local court in Derry on a series of motoring charges.Police say the uninsured driver twice failed to twice stop for police after driving dangerously.An officer writing on PSNI Foyle’s Facebook page says: “Following Constable Blacks bike seizure during the week, Sergeant R, not to be outdone, seized a car whilst on mobile patrol in the Waterside area. claudydangerous drivingMotorist who twice failed to stop for police in Derry arrested for dangerous drivingparkPSNI FOYLE Motorist who twice failed to stop for police in Derry arrested for dangerous driving was last modified: July 29th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags:last_img read more

first_imgRelated StoriesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTThe study reports that crowdsourced data, collected by software applications like Google’s Waze, are highly correlated with conventional reporting data that are often costly to collect and suffer from reporting lag-time. The ability to use crowdsourced user-generated traffic data has several immediate clinical implications for treatment and mortality rates among motor vehicle crash victims as well as for improving efficiency around emergency department operations in the United States.”The potential is game-changing. Trauma surgeons could be notified earlier, diagnostic testing could be prioritized for crash victims, and blood and other life-saving equipment could be made available sooner,” said Chakravarthy. “These pre-hospital and hospital level resources, if activated sooner, could aid in increasing quality and rapidity of patient care and potentially reduce morbidity and mortality.”Every day, more than 100 deaths and 2.5 million emergency department visits result from motor vehicle crashes, making it one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Reducing ambulance and emergency department treatment response time for crash victims could dramatically save lives.Further research is needed on the integration of crowdsourced traffic data as a tool to monitor car crashes and reduce associated mortality, including the potential risks of implementing this approach.Source:University of California – IrvineJournal reference:Chakravarthy, B. et al. (2019) Crowdsourced Traffic Data as an Emerging Tool to Monitor Car Crashes. JAMA Surgery. doi.org/10.1001/jamasurg.2019.1167. According to our research, it takes emergency medical service (EMS) units an average of seven to 14 minutes to arrive on scene after a 911 call. Crowdsourced traffic data might help to cut that time by as much as 60 percent.”Bharath Chakravarthy, vice chair of research and academic affairs for the UCI School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine and one of the researchers on the study Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 24 2019A new UCI-led pilot study finds, on average, Waze “crash alerts” occur two minutes and 41 seconds prior to their corresponding California Highway Patrol (CHP)-reported crash. These minutes could mean the difference between life and death.The paper titled, “Crowdsourced Traffic Data as an Emerging Tool to Monitor Car Crashes,” was published today in JAMA Surgery.last_img read more

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Tesla’s Autopilot engaged during Utah crash The electric vehicles are under intense scrutiny from federal investigators, who have been looking into post-crash battery fires and the performance of Tesla’s Autopilot semi-autonomous driving system. On Wednesday, they traveled to Utah to open another inquiry into a Tesla crash—their fourth this year—in which a Model S slammed into a firetruck that was stopped at a red light.A look at the tweets and Tesla’s past claims about the safety of its vehicles and Autopilot:MUSK (from his tweets Monday): “According to (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), there was an automotive fatality every 86M miles in 2017 ((tilde)40,000 deaths). Tesla was every 320M miles. It’s not possible to be zero, but probability of fatality is much lower in a Tesla.”THE FACTS: This is based on a Tesla analysis of U.S. fatal crashes per miles traveled in 2017. The company’s math is correct on the fatality rate involving all of the nation’s 272 million vehicles, about 150,000 of which are Teslas, according to sales estimates from Ward’s Automotive. But Tesla won’t say how many fatalities occurred in its vehicles or how many miles they were driven.We don’t know of any Tesla fatalities in 2017, but the numbers can vary widely from year to year. There have been at least three already this year and a check of 2016 NHTSA fatal crash data—the most recent year available—shows five deaths in Tesla vehicles. Statistically, experts say Musk’s tweet analysis isn’t valid. While Teslas could have a lower death rate, it may speak more about the demographics of Tesla drivers than it does about safety of the vehicles, says Ken Kolosh, manager of statistics for the National Safety Council.Expensive Teslas tend to be driven by middle-age affluent people who are less likely to get in a crash than younger people, Kolosh said. Also, Tesla drivers tend to live in urban areas and travel on roads with lower speeds, where fatality rates are lower, he said.Musk also is comparing a fleet of older, less-expensive vehicles to his newer and more costly models, Kolosh said. Most Teslas on the road are six years old or less. The average vehicle in the U.S. is 11.6 years old, according to IHS Markit. Older, less-expensive vehicles often aren’t maintained like newer ones and would have more mechanical problems. TESLA: The company has touted on its website and in press releases that the Model S sedan scored the highest numerical rating of any vehicle in NHTSA’s crash tests, and that the Model X was the first SUV to get a five-star rating in every category.THE FACTS: It’s true that the Model S and Model X got five-star crash-test ratings from NHTSA, and the Model S did have the highest numerical score of any vehicle. But in more demanding tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the Model S failed to get the industry group’s coveted “Top Safety Pick” or “Top Safety Pick Plus” ratings.The reasons: the Model S got an “Acceptable” rating in a front-end small offset crash test that mimics when the front driver-side corner of a vehicle collides with a tree or another vehicle. Its headlights also were rated “Poor.” Vehicles have to get the highest rating of “Good” in five crash tests to be top safety picks. Fourteen large cars from other manufacturers received Top Safety Pick or Top Safety Pick Plus ratings. IIHS has not yet done crash tests on Tesla’s Model X or Model 3.The Model S also had a low rate of medical insurance claims for injuries, tying for seventh in IIHS’s most recent rankings. The institute gave it a score of 46, which is 54 percent better than the average score of 100. The Toyota Camry, the top-selling car in America, scored 112. But the Model S had higher collision claim frequencies and was more expensive to fix than gas-powered large luxury cars. In this April 15, 2018, photo, unsold 2018 models sits amid a series of charging stations on a Tesla dealer’s lot in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. For years, Tesla has boasted that its cars and SUVs are safer than other vehicles on the roads, and CEO Elon Musk doubled down on the claims in a series of tweets this week. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File) Citation: FACT CHECK: Tesla safety claims aren’t quite right (2018, May 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-fact-tesla-safety.html For years, Tesla has boasted that its cars and SUVs are safer than other vehicles on the roads, and CEO Elon Musk doubled down on the claims in a series of tweets this week. In this Sept. 29, 2015, file photo, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors Inc., introduces the Model X car at the company’s headquarters in Fremont, Calif. For years, Tesla has boasted that its cars and SUVs are safer than other vehicles on the roads, and Musk doubled down on the claims in a series of tweets this week. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) In this April 15, 2018, photo, the sun shines off the rear deck of a roadster on a Tesla dealer’s lot in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. For years, Tesla has boasted that its cars and SUVs are safer than other vehicles on the roads, and CEO Elon Musk doubled down on the claims in a series of tweets this week. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File) Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In March, the driver of a Tesla Model X was killed in California when his SUV hit a barrier while traveling at “freeway speed.” NHTSA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating that case, in which the Autopilot system was engaged. Autopilot was also engaged in the Utah crash, according to a summary of data from the car.Last week, the NTSB opened a probe into an accident in which a Model S caught fire after crashing into a wall at a high speed in Florida. Two 18-year-olds were trapped in the vehicle and died in the flames. The agency has said it does not expect Autopilot to be a focus of that investigation.___TESLA (from a March 30 press release): “Over a year ago, our first iteration of Autopilot was found by the U.S. government to reduce crash rates by as much as 40 percent.”THE FACTS: The government says it did not assess how effective Autopilot is at reducing crashes. It did mention a 40 percent reduction in crash rates after “Autosteer” was installed in Tesla vehicles, based on data provided by Tesla. Autosteer is the part of Autopilot that keeps the car centered in a lane and can change lanes automatically. NHTSA said it did a “cursory” comparison of crash rates between vehicles with and without Autosteer, but it didn’t consider whether drivers were actually using Autosteer, which has to be manually activated.___ ___MUSK (from his tweets Monday in reference to the Utah crash): “What’s actually amazing about this accident is that a Model S hit a fire truck at 60 mph and the driver only broke an ankle. An impact at that speed usually results in severe injury or death.”THE FACTS: It’s true that the driver in the Utah crash sustained minor injuries considering how fast her car was traveling. The same is true for a January freeway crash near Los Angeles in which the driver was not hurt. But not all Tesla crashes end the same way. In this Dec. 2, 2015, file photo, Tesla Motors Inc. CEO Elon Musk delivers a speech at the Paris Pantheon Sorbonne University as part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. For years, Tesla has boasted that its cars and SUVs are safer than other vehicles on the roads, and CEO Elon Musk doubled down on the claims in a series of tweets this week. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)last_img read more

first_imgSurgical strikes and Balakot demonstrate political will to fight terror: Army Chief Bipin RawatGen Rawat said a political will along with proactive diplomacy is key for success in military mattersadvertisement Abhishek Bhalla New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 12:46 IST Surgical strikes after the Uri attack in 2017 and the aerial strike this year on a terror camp in Balakot by the Indian Air Force has demonstrated that India has the political will to respond against terror, Indian Army Chief Gen Bipin Rawat said on Saturday.Speaking at an event in New Delhi to commemorate 20 years of the Kargil War Gen Rawat said, a political will along with proactive diplomacy is key for success in military matters”We are working in a coordinated manner for a cogent and synchronized national response against sub-conventional and asymmetric threats by any adversary. Surgical strikes post-Uri and Balakot have amply demonstrated our political and military resolve against terror. Any act of terror will not go unpunished,” he said referring to current challenges for the armed forces and lessons learned from the past.The reference to the synergy between the military and diplomacy could be in the context of the Doklam standoff with China and Balakot air strikes. In both instances, the military and diplomatic channels made efforts to work in a coordinated manner to leave little scope for speculation.Speaking of the transformation of the Army since the Kargil War in 1999, Gen Rawat said tri-service wings dedicated to space, cyber and special operations are the way forward for jointness or synergy in the armed forces to combat future challenges.We have come a long way since Kargil. We need to be prepared for future wars and cannot let our guard down, he said.He stressed on the need for capability enhancement and fast track procurement.”While the armed forces have to be prepared for multi-spectrum challenges but at the same time need to be ready for conventional wars,” Rawat added.The Army Chief said the changing dynamics of cyber and space domains is the biggest challenge for the future. We must be prepared for future conflicts that will be more violent and unpredictable as technology will be the key driver in future wars. He talked about threats of cyber attack to critical infrastructure and the constant battle to shape perception in the information domain.Also read: Battle of the Bulge: Bipin Rawat’s radical plan to restructure armyALSO WATCH| Army better prepared to tackle 26\11-like attacks, says General Bipin RawatFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byIram Ara Ibrahim Nextlast_img read more