first_imgThe Government of Liberia through the Liberia Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC) and the Ministry of Commerce & Industry has announced an increase in the price of diesel (fuel oil) on the Liberian Market.According to a petroleum price circular issued by the government, the retail pump price for a gallon of fuel oil has increased from US$2.68 to US$2.98 or its Liberian dollar equivalent of LD$275 (which represents a 30 United States cent increment), while the retail pump price for a gallon of gasoline remains atUS$2.96 or its Liberian dollar equivalent of 270. The prices in Liberian dollars were calculated using the Central Bank’s approved exchange rate of 1USD to LRD$92.00 The new petroleum price ceiling circular issued by LPRC and the Ministry of Commerce & Industry, took effect as of Friday, May 27, 2016. The decision to increase the price of diesel is a result of a shift in the perimeter that is usually used to determine the price of the product in the country.The release thanked all stakeholders in the Downstream Sector of the Petroleum Industry for their commitment in adhering to the price adjustment formula. Meanwhile, the circular warned that the Ministry of Commerce inspectorate unit will closely monitor the approved ceiling prices to avoid the arbitrary hike in the pump prices of gasoline and fuel on the local market. The circular further warned that the Ministry of Commerce will also be closely monitoring the effectiveness of the price circular to ensure that importers do not undercut fellow competitors on the market. In a related development, the LPRC is encouraging consumers to continue their level of understanding; as external factors dictate the cost of these products on the Liberian Market and the sub-region. Prices of petroleum products in Liberia, as reflected in the table (pictured), are still the lowest in the Sub-region. This is largely due to lower levy imposed on petroleum products in the country as compared to other countries.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img17 August 2009Fifa is to give away over 120 000 category four World Cup tickets to 20 000 stadium construction workers and thousands of youngsters involved in community programmes aligned with the Ticket Fund initiative – a first in the 80-year history of the tournament.Speaking at the launch of the World Cup Ticket Fund in Johannesburg last week, Local Organising Committee CEO Danny Jordaan said 40 000 of these tickets would be given to 20 000 construction workers, each worker receiving two tickets for a group stage match at the stadium they had helped to build.The remaining 80 000 tickets will be issued as a reward to thousands of South Africans, particularly youngsters, who are involved in programmes aimed at encouraging participation in football and community-oriented initiatives.These programmes range from making children and young adults aware of health issues, to equipping people with financial literacy skills to manage their lives better, to raising awareness of the need to protect the environment to score “green goals”.The 80 000 tickets will be distributed via the six Fifa partners involved with these programmes: Adidas, Hyundai/Kia, Sony, Coca-Cola, Emirates and Visa. Encouraging learning – Adidas, in partnership with the Department of Education and the 2010 Organising Committee, will award 15 000 tickets to encourage children participating in educational and soccer activities that form part of the official schools campaign, My 2010 School Adventure.  Protecting the environment – Building on a partnership with the South African Department of Education established at the Fifa Confederations Cup, Coca-Cola aims to create a generation of environmentally aware children when they roll out a recycling programme to grade 8 to 12 students in schools across South Africa. 20 000 tickets have been assigned to this project. Healthy lifestyles – Kia Motors will partner with South African development organisation Sporting Chance to run street soccer leagues and health education programmes in some of South Africa’s poorest communities. 5 000 tickets have been assigned to this project.Combating HIV/Aids – Sony has teamed up with Grassroots Soccer, a South African non-profit organisation that uses football to promote HIV/Aids awareness among children and young adults across South Africa. 15 000 tickets have been assigned to this project.Financial literacy – Through Visa’s financial literacy roadshows, low-income workers in the industrial and tourism sectors will get the opportunity to learn basic financial skills. 5 000 tickets have been assigned to this project.Emirates and Hyundai have also confirmed their commitment to the Ticket Fund, with plans to award 15 000 and 5 000 tickets respectively.The Ticket Fund initiative will therefore not end when the final whistle is blown on 11 July 2010, but “will mark only the beginning of long-term partnerships that will continue to create opportunities for South Africans for years to come,” Fifa said in a statement.The Fund “aims to use the excitement and passion for the game in the country as a tool to motivate and engage people, particularly young South Africans, on topics such as education, health and the environment.”Jordaan said that despite the “massive global demand for tickets to the tournament, we are doing all we can to ensure South African residents are well represented in the stadiums with their unique vibrancy and spirit.”The Ticket Fund was also a way of showing appreciation “for the critical role played by the thousands of construction workers whose skill and dedication has made this project a vivid reality.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_imgKelebogile Boikanyo and Aubrey Lodewyk play the parts of lovers Musetta the singer and Marcello the painter in Opera Africa’s production of La Bohème. (Image: Opera Africa) Sandra and Hein de Villiers’s passion for opera has led them to mortgage their house to fund a production – not once, but twice.Sandra is the CEO of Opera Africa, the company she started in 1994 “with the vision of fostering new audiences for opera that were previously excluded from enjoying this genre, and to promote talented young soloists and choristers”. Hein has been Opera Africa’s artistic director since 1995. Like his wife, he brought with him a distinguished track record from more than two decades in music education, as both teacher and administrator.Together with a band of similarly committed individuals – and, of course, some extremely talented performers, directors and visual artists – the pair have been the driving force behind staging a host of operas in South Africa over the last 15 years, including such favourites as Carmen, Faust, La Traviata and Aida.The name of the company is usefully ambiguous; inserting different prepositions between the words “Opera” and “Africa” gives you some idea of both its ambitions and successes. For starters, there is the slightly contentious question of opera in Africa – does a Eurocentric high-art form such as opera have a place in post-apartheid South Africa?Well, yes. First, there are musical and aesthetic strong affinities between opera and South Africa’s well-established choral tradition. Second, in an era of unprecedented globalisation and migration of cultures, there is little value in essentialising what it means to be “African” or “European”.A fine example of such hybridisation is, in fact, Opera Africa’s Princess Magogo – the first full opera sung entirely in isiZulu. First staged in 2000, this is an opera about Africa, depicting the life and times of one of the Usuthu-Buthelezi dynasty’s most famous daughters, herself a renowned composer and singer, with a score by Mzilikazi Khumalo and libretto by Themba Msimang.Princess Magogo and the company’s other productions have appeared across South Africa, in major urban centres as well as in more remote rural areas – opera for Africa, one might say. But they have also toured internationally, in cities as far afield as Chicago, Amsterdam and Oslo, demonstrating that there is such a thing as opera from Africa.Opera Africa’s latest enterprise is La Bohème, which will run at the State Theatre in Pretoria in March 2010 before moving to the Joburg Theatre Complex in Johannesburg in April. (The company has established a good working relationship with these two major Gauteng theatres since relocating from Durban six years ago.)La Bohème is, after Madama Butterfly, the most popular work by Italian composer Giacomo Puccini. Based on Henri Murger’s novel, Scenes from Bohemia, the opera is set in 19th-century Paris and centres on the love affair between Mimi, a seamstress, and Rodolfo, a poet.Over the course of its 110-year performance history, La Bohème has contributed substantially to the modern archetype of the poor artist, struggling in a freezing garret to create immortal works of art but also finding ways to indulge in bouts of hedonism. This archetype has had more recent manifestations in, for instance, the Broadway musical Rent or Baz Luhrman’s film Moulin Rouge.The themes of poverty and illness have obvious echoes in contemporary South African society. While previous Opera Africa productions have foregrounded such similarities by presenting “African” settings, however, the artistic team behind La Bohème have chosen not to do so here. Instead, the production will be “an exquisitely imagined period piece” taking for granted that the “universal and timeless themes” of Puccini’s opera will resonate with local audiences.Andrew Verster, who has worked with Opera Africa as set and costume designer on numerous occasions, will again weave his visual magic, and Themi Venturas, whose Opera Africa repertoire includes Princess Magogo and the 2007 Opera Extravaganza, will direct the stage action.Musically, the production promises to be of the highest standard. Conductor Timothy Myers, who has previously worked with orchestras in New York and London, will have the Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra under his baton. And the company has recruited a formidable group of divas and divos to give voice to the lead roles.Soprano Hanli Stapela, joining Opera Africa for the first time, brings an international reputation to her reprisal of Mimi’s tragic story. Tenor Stéfan Louw, who has likewise been widely acclaimed for his performances in previous productions of La Bohème, will portray the equally unfortunate Rodolfo.Two rising stars of the South African opera scene, Kelebogile Boikanyo and Aubrey Lodewyk – both products of the Tshwane University of Technology’s vocal arts programme – will sing the parts of Musetta and Marcello, the singer and painter whose tempestuous on-off relationship mirrors that of Mimi and Rodolfo. Otto Maidi completes a quintet of bohemian characters as Colline, the philosopher. Veteran bass Rouel Beukes will contribute his idiosyncratic combination of gravitas and levity to two roles: Benoit, Rodolfo’s landlord, and Alcindoro, the wealthy government minister who fancies Musetta.And it’s worth mentioning that the production is sponsored by the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund – so Sandra and Hein won’t need to mortgage their house again.last_img read more

first_imgSeparatist Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF) chief Yasin Malik was arrested on Saturday, when he was on his way to hold a demonstration on a number of issues, including the Kathua rape, outside the Jamia Masjid in Srinagar. He alleged that he was assaulted.“A senior police officer ordered his uniformed soldiers to attack Mr. Malik, who was injured and dragged to the Khanyar police station,” said a JKLF spokesperson.The spokesperson said the assault on Mr. Malik was an act of naked hooliganism. “It’s the police behaviour that is pushing Kashmiris to the wall.They are promoting violence, which is highly condemnable,” he said.Separatist leaders Syed Ali Geelani and Mirwaiz Umar Farooq condemned the police action.“The police’s behaviour against JKLF chairman is a clear indication that Kashmir is a police State. The police have been given a free hand to run its writ,” said Mr. Geelani and the Mirwaiz in a joint statement.The separatist leaders had called for the demonstration to protest “the killing of Kashmiri boys, use of force against the students, illegal detention of leaders by the National Investigation Agency (NIA) and the Kathua rape-and-murder.”Police deny assaultA police spokesman in Srinagar said Mr. Malik was stopped at 12.10 p.m. and asked to produce the car’s papers.“Mr. Malik, instead of producing the papers, obstructed the officer from carrying out his lawful duty. The police have initiated action under relevant provision of the law. The allegations of harassment to these individuals is strongly rebutted,” said the spokesman.last_img read more