first_imgPrecious manuscripts in Sanksrit and its derivatives, Pali and the Prakrits, are soon to be preserved for posterity with the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute (BORI) launching an e-library and commencing on a major digitization process of its treasure trove in Indology.Unperturbed by the tumult of Pune’s dramatically changing landscape, the institute, named after legendary Indologist Ramkrishna Gopal Bhandarkar, was set-up in 1917 and remains a fixture of the city’s historic-cultural fabric and a veritable researchers’ paradise. Its venerated walls house one of South Asia’s largest and most invaluable agglomeration of rare manuscripts.“The move to digitise rare books had begun in earnest since September last year. The institute has formed a three-member committee to examine the institute’s repository of 1.35 lakh books and 28,000 manuscripts,” said Dr. Shreenand Bapat, registrar and curator-in-charge, BORI.While a Zeutschel high-resolution German scanner has been specially procured by the institute at the cost of Rs. 15 lakh, the restoration promises to be a painstaking and laborious process and promises to stretch on for the better part of five years.The scanning process, according to Dr. Bapat, poses particular challenges owing to the age of the manuscripts, some of which are more than a millennium old. “A team of four researchers are working on this project comprising of Prof. Shrikant Bahulkar, Dr. Maitreyee Deshpande and their two assistants. Each day, around 4,000 pages of the manuscripts which have to be digitised and pass it on to an IT company in Mumbai specializing in digitization,” he informed, adding that almost 12 lakh images of pages have to be digitized.At present, around 12,000 manuscripts and books – the rarest of the rare – have been scanned.The Government of Bombay State had first begun a pan-Indian manuscript collection project in the mid-1860s under which eminent scholars like R.G. Bhandarkar and German Indologists Johann Georg Buhler and Lorenz Franz Kielhorn among others collected several thousand manuscripts.This treasure trove, which is to be digitized, was first deposited at Mumbai’s Elphinstone College, from whence it was moved to Pune’s Deccan College for better preservation facilities.There were permanently housed in 1918 in BORI with Lord Willingdon [Major Freeman-Thomas], the then Governor of the Bombay Presidency and the first president of institute, authorizing for the valuable government collection to be transferred there.Among the notable publications that have emerged from this grand collection is a critical 19-volume edition of The Mahabharata, collated with copious critical material, out of nearly 1260 old manuscripts.Apart from the ageing process, the manuscripts have also fallen prey to petty political bickering, most notoriously in 2004, when the institute was shaken by the vandalism committed by the pro-Maratha Sambhaji Brigade, protesting against American scholar’s James Laine’s book on King Shivaji. Several manuscripts were destroyed while Dr. Bahulkar was manhandled by Brigade activists for allegedly explaining the meaning of Sanskrit references to Prof. Laine.The move to build a metadata has always been mired in financial stress, and while baby steps were taken since 2011, the digitization process gained momentum only recently after the Centre approved of a revised budget outlay for the same.In 2003, the National Mission for Manuscripts (NAMAMI) had selected BORI as one of the 32 manuscripts’ resource and conservation centres across the country.last_img read more

10North Carolina State94.6%48.5%+46.2 WKOPPONENTMAKES PLAYOFFDOESN’T MAKE PLAYOFFDIFF. Which other games need to go right for Clemson and Washington?The non-Tigers, non-Huskies matchups that have the most leverage on each team’s playoff chances WKOPPONENTMAKES PLAYOFFDOESN’T MAKE PLAYOFFDIFF. 13Washington State98.073.4+24.7 Each week in this space, we examine all the things a certain contending team needs to have happen in order for it to make the College Football Playoff. This week’s edition is a double feature starring the Clemson Tigers and Washington Huskies, each of which fell out of the AP Top 5 after suffering upset losses last week.Current situations: After Clemson and Washington lost to Syracuse and Arizona State, respectively, the two teams’ College Football Playoff odds were dented pretty badly. According to FiveThirtyEight’s prediction model, the Tigers now have just a 29 percent chance of making the playoff (down from 55 percent going into the weekend), and the Huskies are at 24 percent (down from 43 percent). Six teams are currently ahead of the Tigers and Huskies in our CFP probabilities, and Clemson isn’t even the favorite to win its conference anymore. (Miami has slightly higher odds of winning the ACC.) The relatively straightforward paths for both teams to return to the CFP have now run into major complications.What the Tigers and Huskies can do: As always, winning out is paramount to getting into the playoff. If Clemson runs the table — which our model gives a 20 percent chance of happening — it will have a 97 percent probability of making the CFP, a near-lock. The Tigers’ trip to NC State on Nov. 4 is easily their biggest obstacle to that; they win that game in 95 percent of our simulations that have them going to the playoff, while they only win it 49 percent of the time in sims where they don’t make the CFP. (That 46 percentage point difference makes it the highest-leverage game left in Clemson’s season.) It should also be noted that these numbers assume that Clemson’s star QB Kelly Bryant is healthy; he was knocked out of the Syracuse loss but seems to be progressing quickly in his recovery.For Washington, the odds of winning all its remaining games are a bit higher (21 percent), although the Huskies also have a less guaranteed playoff path — only 87 percent CFP odds — even if they do win out. Washington’s most important game comes at Stanford on Nov. 10, a matchup the Huskies win 96 percent of the time in their playoff-bound simulations but only 40 percent of the time in universes where they don’t make the playoff. 11Notre Dame def. Miami49.546.5+3.0 9Georgia Tech93.675.0+18.6 Washington:PROBABILITY BY WASHINGTON OUTCOME Washington gamesWASHINGTON WIN % BY OUTCOME 10Virginia Tech def. Miami36.832.5+4.3 13South Carolina90.167.3+22.8 8Notre Dame def. USC66.563.9+2.6 12California def. Stanford17.9%14.3%+3.6 13South Carolina def. Clemson28.225.5+2.8 9UCLA95.282.0+13.2 Differences may not add up exactly because of rounding. 9Arizona State def. USC34.531.7+2.9 12Citadel100.099.9+0.1 10Washington St. def. Stanford40.537.8+2.7 10Arizona def. USC28.225.6+2.6 12Wake Forest def. N.C. State44.6%38.2%+6.4 13North Carolina def. N.C. State18.114.5+3.6 10Oregon94.578.4+16.0 11Stanford95.6%39.5%+56.1 WKRESULTMAKES PLAYOFFDOESN’T MAKE PLAYOFFDIFF. 13Notre Dame def. Stanford48.946.2+2.7 11Auburn def. Georgia47.844.4+3.5 12Michigan def. Wisconsin28.325.7+2.6 WKRESULTMAKES PLAYOFFDOESN’T MAKE PLAYOFFDIFF. 11Boston College def. N.C. State26.622.3+4.3 Which of Clemson and Washington’s remaining games hold the most weight?Remaining 2017 matchups, ranked by the amount of leverage on each team’s playoff chances. Based on two sets of simulations: one where the team makes the playoff and one where it doesn’t. 11Florida State93.562.3+31.2 Differences may not add up exactly because of rounding. 12Utah96.782.0+14.7 12Virginia def. Miami17.214.4+2.8 13Georgia Tech def. Georgia30.227.2+3.0 Clemson:PROBABILITY BY CLEMSON OUTCOME Clemson gamesCLEMSON WIN % BY OUTCOME Where they need help: As mentioned above, Clemson doesn’t need much in the way of outside help — as long as the Tigers win, they’re still almost guaranteed to make the playoff. They could benefit slightly from anything that boosts their odds of winning the ACC, however, including losses by NC State and Miami. And any wins by Auburn will automatically help Clemson because of its head-to-head victory against those other Tigers in September.Washington, on the other hand, could use more of an assist from afar. There are two categories for these kinds of games: Some — like Stanford losing to Cal in Week 12 — tend to be entangled with implications about the strength of a team’s own opponents.1For instance, consider a situation in which Team A and Team B are conference rivals. Team B might be less likely to win an unrelated game in a simulation where Team A makes the playoff, because Team B is also likely to be weaker in a universe where Team A beats them head-to-head. (Arizona State beating USC also fits this category, because it makes Washington’s loss to the Sun Devils look less bad.) But the more interesting ones come where the connection isn’t obvious: Georgia Tech beating Georgia, for instance, helps Washington because it hurts an undefeated Bulldogs team that currently sits ahead of the Huskies in our playoff odds. One good piece of news for both Clemson and Washington is that, of the six teams ahead of them in the CFP probabilities, all but likely Big 12 winner TCU hail from just two conferences: the Big Ten and SEC. Since the playoff selection committee puts an emphasis on conference championships, some of those teams will by definition see their odds plummet before the Final Four is chosen — we just don’t know which ones yet. So there aren’t many universes where both, say, Alabama and Georgia make the playoff, or both Ohio State and Penn State (to say nothing of Wisconsin).But Washington and Clemson may also find themselves as enemies down the season’s final stretch; with one loss apiece, they could very likely be competing for the same CFP slot. Indeed, Clemson only makes the playoff in 23 percent of the simulations where Washington is in, versus 31 percent of the sims where Washington misses out. (That same split is 18 percent versus 25 percent from Washington’s perspective.) With only four teams standing at the end of the season, every loss counts — a lesson the Tigers and Huskies might have learned the hard way last weekend.Check out our latest college football predictions. read more

The Ohio State field hockey team will now be waiting on the edge of its seat Tuesday night when it will be finding out if it claimed one of the at-large bids into the 2011 NCAA Championships. The Buckeyes (12-8, 4-2) fell to the host-school, Penn State, 1-0 in a defensive battle on Friday afternoon. By losing in the semifinals of the 2011 Big Ten tournament, the Buckeyes will now need their season resume to make their case as they now stand on the bubble of being a tournament team. The Scarlet and Gray advanced to the semifinals after they defeated Michigan State, 2-1, just the day before when they scored two second-half goals against the Spartans to pave their road to their eventual loss to the Nittany Lions in the next round. The Buckeyes’ play was hindered by the strong Nittany Lions defense, which ranks at the top of the conference. “It’s tough when you are going against a goalie like theirs (Ayla Halus), who was just selected as First Team All-Big Ten this season,” senior captain Ally Tunitis said. “They are a really good team, but we played to the best of our ability.” It was clear heading into the Big Ten tournament that the team truly needed to capture the title as the No. 2 seed and a frontrunner to make it a lock to be in the NCAA Championships. “The automatic bid is what we are going for,” head coach Anne Wilkinson said prior to the tournament. All the Buckeyes can do now is sit and wait as they will be unsure of the future of their season until the selection show, which is scheduled for 8 p.m. Tuesday, with a live stream on NCAA.com. “It was unfortunate it had to end on one stroke,” Tunitis said. “If we don’t get the bid to the tournament, we will still be proud of how we played.” Penn State will now face top-seeded Michigan at 2 p.m. Sunday in the championship game as the Buckeyes will await their destiny. read more

In 2014 the Big Ten will welcome Rutgers University into the conference, in a move that, unfortunately, will also bring Rutgers basketball coach Mike Rice and athletic director Tim Pernetti.An ESPN “Outside the Lines” segment that aired Tuesday showed Rice bullying players during basketball practices from 2010-2012. The coach was shown shoving players, throwing basketballs at them while they were not looking, insulting players with expletives and perhaps most offensive of all, using derogatory slurs regarding sexual orientation.According to “OTL,” tapes of the harsh practices were brought to the attention of Pernetti last summer, but nothing was done. Months later, in December 2012, an internal investigation was launched into the allegations. The investigation only resulted in a $50,000 fine and an unpaid three-game suspension for Rice. Pernetti is also on record saying he never considered firing Rice, who finished the season with a losing 15-16 record.To never even consider firing a coach who physically and emotionally abuses his athletes is outrageous.To call athletes fa–ots and keep Rice at his job is unbelievable, and furthermore, that the athletic director knew about it and let Rice stay makes the situation that much worse. Clearly neither of them has a proper understanding of how to treat individuals, let alone the young minds of those players they have been trusted to care for.To allow Rice to continue to coach seemingly condones the violent behavior toward students and the negative slurs often used toward the gay community that were hurled at his players.Perhaps most troubling, Rutgers is no stranger to dealing with acceptance, or lack thereof, of gay individuals. In September 2010, Rutgers student Tyler Clementi committed suicide, and it is believed he did so due to bullying from others about his homosexuality. The case drew national attention and even resulted in criminal charges being filed against Clementi’s roommate for invasion of privacy.Clearly the athletics department at Rutgers did not learn a lesson from this incident.The Big Ten, or at the very least Ohio State athletics, has higher standards than the way these two men have behaved and have been allowed to behave.Both OSU athletic director Gene Smith and President E. Gordon Gee have talked, before the Rutgers incident, about inclusion and acceptance of all athletes and students at OSU.“Inclusion is something I’ve always believed in,” Smith said in an exclusive interview with The Lantern on March 12. “I’ve always believed that a diverse environment allows you to have different thoughts and different views and ultimately you get the best out of that environment.”Gee agreed.“I believe that athletes, non-athletes (whatever), we want to be a university that is very friendly to all of our students and our faculty and staff,” Gee said while visiting The Lantern on March 25.Rutgers needs to let Pernetti and Rice go. A three-game suspension in December means nothing to a basketball program and is insulting to the memory of Clementi. Their behavior is not the kind that should be allowed into Big Ten athletics. read more

first_imgFormer Arsenal’s midfielder Jack Wilshere left Arsenal to Chelsea a few days ago and his former boss Unai Emery has revealed why   Wilshere ended his 17-year stay at Arsenal.After Wilshere moved to West Ham, he revealed his thoughts in an emotional message to fans on social media while admitting that Emery had made it clear he won’t have him in his plans for next season.However, Emery on his own revealed how the England international star departed, describing it as a ‘tactical and technical decision’.“The conversation with Wilshere was a very good conversation,” said Emery via Football London.“I explained to him my opinion and how I want to create the team and that I’m not sure he would play in the 11 players.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“And also he explained to me that the decision was not easy for him but he wanted to choose the best option for him.“I know this player is important for the supporters and he grew up here in Arsenal, but I don’t give him one spot in the eleven who start.“So for that, he chooses to leave and I respect this.”When asked if Wilshere’s past injury record had played a part in his thinking, Emery added simply: “It was a tactical, technical decision.”last_img read more

first_imgLaura Isensee/Houston Public MediaParent and activist Travis McGee addressed a crowd of people at the HISD meeting while the board was in closed session and before a scuffle erupted with police officers.Months ago in May, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner announced that he wanted the city to get directly involved in local schools.Now that desire has evolved into a new nonprofit, created by Turner’s education office.It’s the latest effort to address problems with Houston’s chronically under-performing schools and the threat of a state take-over, but already it’s drawing protests and push-back from parents and education advocates.“I recognize there needs to be a collaborative effort and shouldn’t be something I should do by myself, but collaboratively, there should be no low-performing schools in my city,” Turner said earlier this year.The city-related nonprofit is called the Coalition for Educational Excellence and Equity in Houston. News 88.7 obtained state records that show Turner’s education chief Juliet Stipeche and three civic leaders are heading up the coalition. Listen About half a dozen people protested the idea at City Hall. Bobbie Cohen called it an effort to privatize public education.“I don’t know why the city has decided to involve itself in a nonprofit coalition with three board members none of whom seem to have any real expertise in education, unless, of course, you count lobbying for ALEC which is an organization that has never met a government entity it did not want to privatize,” Cohen said. Still, Turner defended the effort: “It is an offer, it is up to HISD. No one here is trying to force HISD to do anything. No one.”HISD Board President Rhonda Skillern-Jones told News 88.7 that the board will vote on issuing an RFP (meaning a Request for Proposal) on Thursday. “After then we will know how to move forward,” said Skillern-Jones.Earlier this year, when the HISD board considered approving an outside partnership for struggling schools, the controversial measure sparked protests and arrests at the public meeting.EDITOR’S NOTE: This story has been updated to include the comment by HISD Board President Rhonda Skillern-Jones. Share X Under the state law known as SB 1882, the Houston Independent School District could give the nonprofit temporary control of some Houston schools. That in turn would give the district a two-year pause on steep sanctions, including a potential state takeover.The board has to decide by early February if it wants to pursue this effort or any other partnership for struggling schools. This week, the HISD board added a new agenda item for its meeting Thursday to decide if they want to request any outside partnerships.On Tuesday, Turner issued new details on the objectives of the coalition and defended it at City Hall.He outlined in a statement that the nonprofit aims to administer 15 HISD schools. They would include struggling schools that could trigger state sanctions and their related schools in their neighborhoods, or feeder patterns. Turner also said that he plans to appoint six more board members to the nonprofit. So far, three business executives are the only voting members: Corbin J. Robertson Jr.; Trinidad “Trini” Vasquez-Mendenhall; and Stephanie Nellons-Paige. Xcenter_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /00:57 00:00 /00:54 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: last_img read more

first_img New species of lizard found in stomach of Cretaceous microraptor Researchers have discovered that small mammals, such as those similar to this dormouse, tend to survive longer as a species, while larger mammals tend to die out and/or evolve faster. Image: H. Osadnik. Explore further But overall, small mammals’ ability to hibernate or enter a state of torpor seems to give them the largest benefit for prolonging their species duration. As the researchers found, 41 of 67 (61 percent) extinct small mammal genera had some kind of hibernation ability, while only 15 of 50 (30 percent) extinct large mammal genera did. And the small mammals that didn’t hibernate had relatively faster evolution rates, as they were forced to cope with the elements. The longest living genera in the study were a mole, two gliding squirrels, and two dormice, which lasted about 16 million years, and all had the ability to burrow or hibernate. The tapir was the only large mammal that evolved at a slow rate more akin to the smaller mammals. Most large mammals that didn’t hibernate evolved into a new species or went extinct in just a few million years. The shortest duration in the researchers’ data was one million years. However, Stenseth noted that the truly short-lived creatures are invisible in the fossil record. He also explained that short-lived and long-lived mammals both have their own advantages and disadvantages.“The most diverse and abundant groups, such as the mouse-like (muroid) rodents, have high origination and extinction rates,” he said. “But slow evolvers like dormice are successful in their own way, and clearly very good at what they are doing.”In light of the current climate crisis, this study may help scientists predict which kinds of species are more vulnerable to climatic fluctuations, the authors explain. “There has been a steady loss of large mammals in recent times, and this trend is likely to continue,” said Mikael Fortelius, geology professor at the University of Helsinki and a co-author of the paper. “We are currently extending our PNAS study to include living mammals and hope to be able to present our results soon.”More information: Liow, Lee Hsiang;, Fortelius, Mikael; Bingham, Ella; Lintulaakso, Kari; Mannila, Heikki; Flynn, Larry; and Stenseth, Nils Chr. “Higher origination and extinction rates in larger mammals.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. April 22, 2008, vol. 105, no. 16, 6097-6102.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Recently, a team of researchers from Finland, Norway and the US has found that larger mammals seem to evolve more quickly than smaller ones – but the reason isn’t body size, per se. Rather, the scientists found that some smaller mammals have the ability to hibernate, burrow or hide in other shelters. In doing so, they effectively sleep through harsh environmental changes. Larger mammals, on the other hand, must endure the hard times when there’s little food or extreme weather. Their large size constrains them from digging burrows or lowering their metabolic rates for extended time periods. In a sense, larger mammals face the elements head-on like a fearless adventurer who might not make it through alive, and is forever changed by the experience.The finding – which is based on analysis of a large Neogene Old World fossil dataset – is somewhat surprising. On an individual level, large mammals tend to live significantly longer than smaller ones. For example, elephants can live up to 70 years, while shrews are lucky to reach two. Because of their faster generation times, small mammals should evolve faster, and small mammal species and genera should appear and go extinct faster – but this is not the case. “We believe the greatest significance of our work is showing that, contrary to expectation, small mammals do not evolve faster than large mammals, and that some of them actually evolve much slower,” Nils Stenseth, zoology professor at the University of Oslo, told PhysOrg.com. “The greatest potential significance is in the SLOH [sleep-or-hide] hypothesis – specifically in its implication that removing part of the environmental pressure slows down evolution quite dramatically.”Previous studies – some focusing on tropical mammals – have had mixed results on size-based evolution rates for fossil mammals, with some finding the opposite pattern and some finding no difference. One possible explanation is that large mammals in tropical climates don’t face such harsh environmental conditions, and so they may last longer and evolve more slowly. Further, smaller mammals in tropical areas may suffer from the increased competition, leading to more rapid turnover rates for them.center_img Citation: Large mammal species live harder, die out faster (2008, May 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-05-large-mammal-species-harder-die.html Throughout Earth’s history, species have come and gone, being replaced by new ones that are better able to cope with life’s challenges. But some species last longer than others, while others may die out sooner or evolve more quickly. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more