Tag Archives: 夜上海论坛MS

06Oct/20

Burleigh Heads reno shows you can mix the old with the new

first_img15 Bunyip St, Burleigh Heads.THIS stylish Burleigh Heads house perfectly blends the old with the new.Built in the mid-1960s, it was one of the only houses built on Bunyip St — most houses were brought in by truck.Owner Jonathan Milman could see the potential of the house as soon as he stepped inside the property four years ago.“I fell in love with it the moment I walked in the door,” he said. “It was bright yellow outside, with the most awful 1980s window dressings and odd floor plan when I purchased it in 2013.”15 Bunyip St, Burleigh Heads.The 34-year-old decided to renovate while retaining as much of the original property as he could.“This includes gorgeously rich hardwood timber floors, pressed Masonite (timber) feature walls, carved balustrade by the stairs and hardwood hopper windows.“The exterior retains the hardwood timber weatherboards, while I’ve added contemporary render below to separate the modern from the original heritage in a blending of the generations that I think worked quite well.15 Bunyip St, Burleigh Heads.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North7 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago“A huge amount of work has been done to rejuvenate the home,” Mr Milman said.“There is nothing more to do, and it is ready for one lucky family to move in.”The four-bedroom house has a relaxed beach vibe throughout. It features an array of living areas, pool and Bali hut.Mr Milman is planning to downsize and travel.The property is going to auction on July 2.ON THE MARKET15 BUNYIP ST, BURLEIGH HEADSAgent: Alison Danziger, @realtyFeatures: Fifth bedroom or media room, with integrated HD projector, freestanding bath, reading nook, freestanding bathArea: 647sq mAuction: 2pm, July 2, on siteInspections: By appointmentlast_img read more

29Aug/20

‘Nothing has changed’ – Kevin-Prince Boateng says after Balotelli is racially-abused

first_imgGhanaian international, Kevin-Prince Boateng has said that despite constant reports of racism at football grounds in Italy, he does not intend to give up the fight.Boateng tweeted a video of the infamous incident in 2013 when he grabbed the ball, kicked it into the stands and walked off the pitch after suffering racist abuse while playing for AC Milan in a friendly match against lower league side, Pro Patria.“6 years later NOTHING has changed but we don’t give up! Let’s keep fighting ALL TOGETHER against racism!,” he tweeted.The incident came under a global spotlight with criticism levelled at Italian football authorities for failing to curb rampant racism in the Serie A and the country’s lower divisions.In a bid to address the matter, FIFA, which has itself come up for a lot of flak for not putting stricter measures in place to deal with racism set up a taskforce.However six years down the line, racism remains a major issue across Europe and particularly in Italian football.6 years later NOTHING has changed but we don’t give up! Let’s keep fighting ALL TOGHETER against racism! #NOTORACISM #prince10 #handmade pic.twitter.com/fXil7X2U3f— Kevin-Prince Boateng (@KPBofficial) November 4, 2019‘Shame on you’Boateng’s post comes after Italy international, Mario Balotelli, suffered racist abuse over the weekend as his side Brescia lost 2-1 to Verona in the Serie A.The forward kicked a ball into the crowd and almost walked off the pitch but he was eventually convinced to complete the game by his teammates.He responded by scoring Brescia’s only goal of the game, a stunner, late on.After the game, Balotelli thanked his teammates and fans who supported him and aimed a slight jab at Italian football authorities for their failure to clamp down on racism.“Thanks to all the colleagues on and off the field for the solidarity expressed toward me and all of the messages received from you fans. A heartfelt thanks. You’ve shown yourself to be real men, not like those who deny the evidence.”Balotelli posted a video of some Verona fans making monkey chants, stating that they should be ashamed of themselves.“The ‘people’ of this curva who made the monkey chants. Shame on you, shame on you, shame on you. In front of your children, wives, relatives, parents, friends and acquaintances…. shame.” Mario Balotelli responded to the racist chants by kicking the ball into the stands.His teammates and match officials convinced the striker to remain on the pitch. pic.twitter.com/vvzuY7oBHZlast_img read more

09Sep/19

Walker Outlines Plans For Budget Cuts

first_img(Skip Gray/KTOO Public Media)With Alaska facing a multi-billion-dollar budget shortfall, Gov. Bill Walker is proposing 5 percent cuts to agency funding. He described his fiscal plan in his State of the Budget address on Thursday night — a speech that has not been given since 2006. APRN’s Alexandra Gutierrez reports.Download AudioThere was no mention of Alaskan Brewery beer or Mat-Su carrots — no applause lines or jokes. Compared to Wednesday’s State of the State speech delivered, Gov. Bill Walker’s State of the Budget address was a sober event.“Alaska’s state government funding has two drivers: oil price and oil production,” said Walker. “Unfortunately, neither is going in our favor right now.”For half an hour, Walker described the budget he planned to submit. He has until February 18 to turn in his own budget, and he’s been using former Gov. Sean Parnell’s plan as a placeholder in the meantime.Walker said cuts would be spread across the board. He intends to shrink agency expenditures that are not dictated by formulas by 5 percent from the draft he was given by Parnell. Walker said that amount would be doubled for his own office. By the end of his term, agency budgets could be reduced by as much as 25 percent.Walker also said that even the sacred cows of the Alaska budget would not be off limits.“In my endorsed budget, the K-12 formula funding remains intact, but I’ve eliminated the one-time funding added last year,” said Walker. “This equates to a 2.5 percent funding reduction.”Walker noted that the school funding formula would be reviewed over the next year, and that education would be forward funded at 90 percent instead of in its entirety.Community revenue sharing — the money the state provides to municipalities to bolster their own budgets — was described as vulnerable and at risk of being phased out, though Walker plans to keep the program mostly intact this year.“Municipalities will receive $57 million dollars in revenue sharing. That is $3 million less than last year,” said Walker.While cuts were the general rule, Walker mentioned a few additions to his budget. He bumped his capital request up to $150 million in state spending to include some projects that are currently under construction, but not yet complete. And he again asked for the Legislature’s support in seeking $450 million in Medicaid funding from the federal government.“Investing in the health of Alaskans is sound, prudent fiscal policy,” said Walker. “We all want Alaskans to be as productive as possible, but people cannot work, hunt or fish unless they are healthy.”Walker said that with a leaner budget, the state should be able to deal with a shortfall so long as oil prices bounce back next year. But if they do not, Walker suggested that the state may have to look at finding new forms of revenue next year, which could mean taxes or repeals of credits and subsidies.“If prices stay low next legislative session, we will need to discuss more traditional revenue options,” said Walker.At the end of his speech, Walker’s staff distributed a slim budget handout to legislators. With his official operating and capital budgets still outstanding, the packet gave agency spending totals with itemizing how the money was being used.It showed that the Departments of Labor, Commerce, and Law face the deepest cuts, while the Departments of Natural Resources and Public Safety as well as the university system survive mostly intact.The budget summary also showed that even after all the reductions Walker described, Alaska was still facing a deficit in excess of $3 billion. And while every agency but one was seeing its funding cut, Walker’s budget was still technically larger than the one than Parnell handed to him because Walker does not plan to use bonds to cover a $257 million appropriation to the state’s pension fund.After skimming the freshly released budget documents, legislators responded mostly favorably to Walker’s State of the Budget address.Sen. Anna MacKinnon, an Eagle River Republican who co-chairs the finance committee, said she was encouraged by Walker’s direction.“I think the governor took a courageous first step in putting things on the table that are going to be hard to talk about,” said MacKinnon.Senate President Kevin Meyer, of Anchorage, said he was “lockstep” with the governor in trying to address the state’s shortfall, but was disappointed to hear that education cuts were possible.“We’ll certainly look at that, and talk to our local school districts, and just see what kind of impact that will have to our schools,” said Meyer.In addressing Walker’s budget speech, House Finance Co-Chair Steve Thompson noted that the state may have to consider taxes as well as cuts to address the deficit.“We’re going to have to realize that even with this reduction and probably another reduction next year that we’re still going to run out of money here in a very short time,” said Thompson. “I think we need to start the discussion about reducing the budget. We’re doing our side of the job, but that’s not going to complete the job. We’re going to have to look at other revenues.”Meanwhile, Democrats responded positively toward the speech, but acknowledged the way education and labor spending were treated gives them pause.“We applaud that he wants to stay focused on the long game,” said Senate Minority Leader Berta Gardner, of Anchorage. “That’s what we have to do, and one of the problems with the legislative process is we get bogged down and we have to plan for tomorrow, and not overreact today.”While lawmakers do not yet have Walker’s budget before them, the Legislature finance committees are already meeting to do work on the document.last_img read more