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26Jan/21

Seniors weigh options for class Legacy Fund options

first_imgAfter sifting through hundreds of suggestions from Notre Dame seniors, the final options for the Class of 2011 Legacy Fund focus on helping students who are in need of financial assistance. Each year, the Student Development Committee (SDC) chooses a few ideas for the fund and the senior class votes on them and chooses where they would like their donations to go. There are five choices this year, and the voting began about a week ago and will most likely extend until Wednesday, said SDC Co-Chairs Maggie Nettesheim and Maria Sellers. “Something we definitely thought about a lot is that we wanted it to be something that would continue to make a difference on campus,” Nettesheim said. “We wanted it to be something that would improve life on campus and would continue to do so.” This year’s choices focus on providing funds for students who are in need of financial aid for a variety of occasions. The first option is a study abroad assistance fund. This program would be designed for students on financial aid who wish to go to abroad, Nettesheim said. “If they choose to go abroad, it would give them a little more spending money,” Nettesheim said. The second choice is a partial tuition scholarship for incoming freshmen each year. Seniors’ third option is a stipend for students who would like to do summer service, but aren’t sure where their funds would come from. “The summer service one would be a fund for those who want to do service, international or national, but they don’t have funds for where they’re living,” Sellers said. Nettesheim said it would be particularly useful for students who do not feel they could give up a summer income, and it could apply to any service endeavor, even if it’s not through Notre Dame. The fourth choice is an emergency assistance fund. This money could be used at the discretion of rectors in the event of an emergency, such as a death in the family of a student who is unable to cover the price of a plane ticket home. The last option is a donation to RecSports, which would allow for the purchase of new uniforms or equipment. SDC used multiple sources to gauge where the seniors wanted the fund to go to, including booths at senior events and an online poll. Nettesheim said this year’s senior class was very enthusiastic in contributing ideas. “We got probably 200 suggestions from the senior class when we did the online poll,” Nettesheim said. “We in the committee then narrowed it down from those suggestions.” The final outcome of the vote will most likely be announced in December. Tim Ponisciak, the assistant director of the Annual Fund, said the Senior Legacy Fund can generate anywhere from $60,000 to $100,000. Contributing to the Senior Legacy is the first step into the Annual Fund, which is a general fund that accepts donations to support “virtually everything under the Dome,” such as financial aid for students or advancing Notre Dame’s Catholic mission, according to its website. “In the spring we’ll send out a letter and brochure telling them about the sponsored fund, but also telling them a little about the Annual Fund,” Ponisciak said. Ponisciak said seniors are encouraged to contribute to the sponsored legacy fund, but they are also welcome to make a donation to any other fund at Notre Dame. “For a senior to participate in the legacy they don’t have to give to the sponsored fund,” Ponisciak said. “They can participate in another aspect of campus that they feel strongly about.” Although it is targeted toward the current seniors, other members of the Notre Dame community can contribute to the legacy as well. “Through the phone center, we call their parents to see if the parents want to give on their behalf,” Nettesheim said. “Also, that fund stays in existence. Any alumni really could donate.” For Nettesheim, the Senior Legacy Fund is important because it gives seniors the opportunity to give back to the University that gave so much to them. “I think most of us leave Notre Dame feeling like it’s been the best four years of our lives,” Nettesheim said. “And if you can get seniors exciting about giving back to the university and start that commitment early then I think that’s great.”last_img read more

28Sep/20

Inpex eyes FEED work for Abadi LNG project following revised plan approval

first_imgFollowing approval from Indonesian authorities of Inpex’s revised plan for Abadi LNG project, Inpex and its partner Shell are set to start preparations for Front End Engineering Design (FEED) work for the project. Inpex receives approval of revised plan of development. Source: InpexInpex and Shell will develop Abadi via an offshore production facility and a 9.5 million tonnes per annum (mmpta) onshore LNG plant, at an estimated cost of $20 billion.As previously reported, Inpex received approval from Indonesian authorities for the revised Plan of Development (POD) for the Abadi LNG project, which is located in the Arafura Sea, offshore Indonesia.However, according to Wood Mackenzie, the development still faces several challenges, including a crowded EPC market, finding buyers for the LNG, and technical challenges.In a statement on Tuesday, Inpex confirmed that the plan had been approved. In addition to the revised POD, the authorities also approved the application for a seven-year additional time allocation and a 20-year extension to the Production Sharing Contract (PSC) for the Masela Block, extending the term of the PSC until 2055.Takayuki Ueda, President & CEO of Inpex, commented: “While the project’s development concept has been changed from a floating LNG scheme to an onshore LNG scheme, I am confident that the economics of the Project based on the revised POD are now sufficiently strong for Inpex and Shell given the PSC term until 2055 and sufficient financial conditions have been secured following a series of constructive discussions with the authorities.“Inpex aims to make this project competitive and will continue to work toward the production startup scheduled in the latter half of the 2020s.”Moving forward, Inpex said that, together with its partner Shell, the company would begin the necessary preparations to start FEED work. Preparations will mainly consist of the mobilization of operational personnel and bidding-related work for the selection of contractors undertaking FEED work.A final investment decision (FID) is subject to a series of subsequent evaluations, including FEED work. Inpex is expected to make the FID within three years and first gas is expected in 2028.Commenting on the POD Approval, Clare Harris, Shell’s Executive Vice President Venture Development said, “Obtaining approval for the Plan of Development is an important achievement and Shell appreciates the constructive partnership of the authorities that has enabled progress on this major milestone.”Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

26Aug/20

Mike Trout has a pair of big hits in Angels’ comeback victory over Royals

first_img Mike Trout, with bat and glove, helps Angels end losing streak Pujols had walked and hit a bases-loaded fly ball to the warning track in his first three trips, before delivering RBI singles in the sixth – to put the Angels ahead for the first time – and the eighth.Pujols’ final hit increased the Angels lead to three runs, which was enough for Blake Parker to close it out, giving the Angels their second victory in a row.It was a rare game in which the Angels’ hitters bailed out the pitchers, as starter Nick Tropeano gave up five runs and put the Angels in a 5-2 hole.“They picked me up huge,” said Tropeano, who allowed five runs in 4-2/3 innings. “Obviously I didn’t have my best stuff today. Having the leadoff guy on in every inning is not a recipe for success. … We’re going to pick each other up. The offense was huge, and the bullpen picked me up, and we got the win.”Related Articles “It was a crazy one,” Trout said. “That guy was pretty funky. Once I got to two strikes, I was just trying to put the ball in play and I found a hole up the middle.”Trout rarely gets the opportunity to have big hits in the late innings because opponents usually pitch around him. This time, he came up in both spots with two runners on base, and with Justin Upton and Albert Pujols swinging the bat well behind him.The Royals had to pitch to him.“The night presented guys on base, and I was just trying not to do too much,” Trout said. “Get a pitch I can hit, and don’t miss it. Just barrel it up, and I did tonight.”Sign up for Home Turf and get 3 exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.He had the support of the hitters behind him. Upton had singled, walked and hit a homer before Trout’s tying hit in the sixth. When he followed Trout to the plate after his go-ahead hit in the eighth, he delivered an insurance RBI single. Clippers, Mavericks brace for the unknown in Game 4 Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros PreviousLos Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani waits for his turn to hit during warmups prior to a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte dodges a pitch during the third inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Nick Tropeano throws to the plate against the Kansas City Royals during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Whit Merrifield #15 congratulates Mike Moustakas #8 after scoring on a two-run RBI double by Jorge Soler #12 of the Kansas City Royals during the fifth inning of a game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Whit Merrifield #15 is congratulated in the dugout after scoring on a two-run RBI double hit by Jorge Soler #12 of the Kansas City Royals during the fifth inning of a game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Jorge Soler #12 of the Kansas City Royals watches his two-run RBI double as Martin Maldonado #12 of the Los Angeles Angels looks on during the fifth inning of a game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Zack Cozart #7 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim fields a fielders choice singele hit by Jorge Soler #12 of the Kansas City Royals during the third inning of a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Kansas City Royals starting pitcher Danny Duffy throws to the plate against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Justin Upton #8 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim has trouble fielding a double hit by Mike Moustakas #8 of the Kansas City Royals during the third inning of a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Jefry Marte #19 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim hits a solo homerun during the sixth inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Danny Duffy #41 of the Kansas City Royals returns to the mound after allowing a solo homerun by Martin Maldonado #12 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim during the sixth inning of a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Ian Kinsler #3 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim is tagged out at home by Salvador Perez #13 of the Kansas City Royals during the sixth inning of a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Andrelton Simmons hits an RBI sacrifice fly to center field to score Mike Trout during the first inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Nick Tropeano throws to the plate against the Kansas City Royals during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte watches his solo home run during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte, right, touches up at the plate after his solo home run, as Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez looks away, during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte, right, scores with Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez, center, and home plate umpire Gabe Morales watching, on a single by Martin Maldonado during the second inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Jefry Marte #19 has his helmet removed by Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim after hitting a solo homerun during the sixth inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, right, hits a single to right with Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez and home plate umpire Gabe Morales, left, watching during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout hits an RBI single to score Shohei Ohtani during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Shohei Ohtani #17 points to first base after scoring on an RBI single by Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim during the sixth inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Shohei Ohtani #17 is congratulated in the dugout after scoring on an RBI single by Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim single during the sixth inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim runs to first base after hitting an RBI single during the eighth inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout, left, scores behind Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez on a single by Albert Pujols during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. Los Angeles won, 9-6. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Justin Upton hits an RBI single to right field during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. Los Angeles won, 9-6. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Blake Parker reacts after striking out Kansas City Royals’ Jorge Soler to end a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. The Angels won 9-6. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Michael Hermosillo #59 scores on an RBI single by Justin Upton #8 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim as Salvador Perez #13 of the Kansas City Royals looks on during the eighth inning of a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Blake Parker #53 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim reacts after defeating the Kansas City Royals 9-6 in a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Martin Maldonado #12 congratulates Blake Parker #53 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim after defeating the Kansas City Royals 9-6 in a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Martin Maldonado #12 celebrates with Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim after defeating the Kansas City Royals 9-6 in a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JUNE 04: Mike Trout #27, Justin Upton #8 and Michael Hermosillo #59 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim celebrate after defeating the Kansas City Royals 9-6 in a game at Angel Stadium on June 4, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani waits for his turn to hit during warmups prior to a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte dodges a pitch during the third inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)NextShow Caption1 of 31Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte dodges a pitch during the third inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Anaheim, Calif., Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ExpandANAHEIM — Mike Trout tied the score with a rocket and he won the game with a … well, it will look like a rocket in the box score.The Angels’ 9-6 come-from-behind victory over the Kansas City Royals on Monday night was built upon key hits from throughout the lineup, but Trout had two of the biggest.In the sixth, he completed the comeback from a 5-2 deficit with a game-tying single on a line drive that left his bat at 113 mph.Then he came up again in the eighth in a 6-6 game, with runners at first and second, and he hit what could have been a routine comebacker. The ball nicked off the glove of pitcher Burch Smith and skipped into center field, for a go-ahead single. And they say 13 is an unlucky number. 😏@JUST_JUP pic.twitter.com/fuLOrUYCw9— Angels (@Angels) June 5, 2018 Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros The comeback began with Upton’s homer in the fifth, followed by Jefry Marte’s homer in the sixth, one of his career-high four hits.Shohei Ohtani then delivered his second pinch-hit of the season, squirting an infield hit through the shift on the right side and using his speed to get on base.An Ian Kinsler walk then preceded Trout’s game-tying single, and Pujols then put the Angels ahead 6-5.The lead then disappeared when Noé Ramírez gave up a homer to Sal Pérez on his first pitch of the seventh, tying the score once more.Cam Bedrosian followed Ramírez to the mound and pitched a perfect eighth, setting up the winning rally.last_img read more

26Aug/20

Under new executive Andrew Friedman, Dodgers prepare for a brave new world

first_imgThe Rays’ front office includes a pair of Yale graduates; one was hired straight from the staff of Baseball Prospectus, a sabermetric-drenched media outlet. Their director of baseball operations came from Baseball Info Solutions, which cultivates advanced data for major-league teams and agents.According to the Rays’ media guide, all three men are department directors in title. That’s a markedly different structure from the Dodgers’ current staff, where a background in analytics was valued but generally confined to its own department.And yet, the amount of next-level data at its disposal isn’t what separates Tampa Bay from other teams.“They don’t know anything anybody else doesn’t,” one American League talent evaluator said of the Rays. “If you’re an organization that’s truly managed well, you’re focused on a culture of efficiency as opposed to chasing the next best thing — that’s probably what the Rays do really well.”Friedman himself received a baseball scholarship to Tulane University, where he graduated with a bachelor of science in management with a concentration in finance. He spent two years as an analyst with the New York City-based investment firm Bear, Stearns & Co., and three years as an associate for the private equity firm MidMark Capital. Friedman’s first job in baseball came at age 26 with the Rays, as their director of baseball development.The AL evaluator said such a willingness to hire talent from outside the traditional baseball scope is a hallmark of progressive front offices like those in Tampa Bay, Houston and Oakland, to name a few.It’s an exception to the rule for the Dodgers. President and CEO Stan Kasten said Tuesday the Dodgers are “solid middle of the pack” in terms of its analytical know-how.“I feel we should be leaders,” he said. Who better than Friedman to lead the way?In Tampa, Friedman did not have a locker in the clubhouse. Neither was he a distant figure who spent more time looking at spreadsheets than watching games and talking to his players.Dodgers pitcher Jamey Wright, who spent the 2013 season in Tampa, recalled seeing Friedman in the clubhouse frequently, his young son running around the room of grown men.“He was pretty visible, chatting with the coaches, the manager, the players,” Wright said. “He’s young. He has lots of energy. I liked seeing him down there, asking him questions. He’d ask us questions.”The secret to the Rays’ success, in Wright’s opinion, was getting the most out of all 25 players on the roster — extracting wins from replacement-level players, the ultimate measure of baseball efficiency. Wright said Friedman’s desire to win should endear himself to Dodgers manager Don Mattingly, and vice versa.But the Dodgers are an older team than the Rays. They’ve relied less on homegrown players to fill their major-league roster in recent years. With a handful of exceptions, the ceiling seems to have been established for most of them. So why would Friedman voluntarily take on a roster full of superstars?“I think you’re always looking for a new challenge,” Wright said. “They had a great thing over there (in Tampa). As a person, as a GM, as a man, you want to evolve.”Maybe therein lies the Dodgers’ biggest selling point. For all its history and tradition, the organization needed to evolve too. In Kasten’s terms, this is “Phase 2” of the Guggenheim Baseball blueprint, and the plan is in Friedman’s hands now.Nobody knows exactly what that blueprint will look like. Kasten isn’t sure himself.Claire dusted off one piece of advice from the old playbook.“The fundamentals of what was important remain the same,” he said. “When I became GM, I said, ‘The buck stops here.’ Not to say, ‘Look at the authority I have,’ but from a philosophical baseball view, responsibility has to be placed. The public needs to know who’s in charge.“I don’t know what an ‘organizational decision’ is. Someone has to make a decision.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error When Fred Claire became the Dodgers’ general manager in April 1987, he inherited a farm director, William Schweppe, and a scouting director, Ben Wade, who had been with the team in some capacity since it moved to Los Angeles from Brooklyn.Along with team president Peter O’Malley, that was the Dodgers’ front office. Four men.“I relied heavily on pro scouts,” Claire said. “I also relied greatly on my farm director (Wade) and my scouting director (Schweppe) … phone calls to the minor-league managers.”This was only 27 years ago, but the memories might as well exist in sepia-toned photographs, preserved in a Ken Burns documentary.center_img By hiring former Tampa Bay Rays general manager Andrew Friedman on Tuesday to head their baseball operations staff, the Dodgers are entering a brave new world. They aren’t the first team to go there and they won’t be the last. The new world isn’t all that scary. Nor is it as simple as valuing the nebulous concept of “analytics” more than in the past nine years under general manager-turned-advisor Ned Colletti. Rather, the key difference is having a front office stacked with baseball minds from diverse backgrounds.If the Rays’ blueprint offers any clue, the Dodgers’ front office under Friedman will be drastically different than one led by a former scout (Colletti), whose top advisors were both former scouts. Only for the past few years has a strong, discernable analytics department been in place.People familiar with Friedman’s teams in Tampa Bay paint a different picture: A relatively insular organization, led by younger upper-level executives who have worked for maybe one other team, if any.last_img read more