Tag Archives: 夜上海论坛YZ

26Jan/21

O’Connell talks television

first_imgContent will continue to be the most important aspect in the future of the rapidly changing television industry, Katie O’Connell told students in a lecture Monday night. O’Connell, senior vice president of drama development for NBC, graduated from Notre Dame in 1991 and has experience as an executive producer for NBC and CBS. She has also worked on major television shows such as 30 Rock, 24 and Law and Order. “Content will always be king,” she said. “Television is changing so rapidly, so the biggest piece of advice I can give you is to be on top of it.” Many of the students who attended O’Connell’s lecture were Film, Television and Theatre majors. She said they were lucky because that major did not exist when she was a student at Notre Dame. She graduated with a degree in American Studies. O’Connell began her lecture by describing the many different types of jobs that are available in the television industry today, including careers with networks, as managers and agents or as members of television shows’ creative teams. She discussed the most well-known jobs in the industry, but also encouraged students to explore lesser-known jobs. Students should save their money if they plan to move to Los Angeles, O’Connell said, as it is difficult to find a steady income in the field of television. O’Connell concluded the lecture with her thoughts on the future of television. She said the television business was moving toward becoming entirely digital, and mentioned the newly available online rentals of Apple and Amazon. “Work with the architects of change,” she said. O’Connell said although the transition into a more digital version of television may not occur in the next five years, but it will happen in the lifetime of today’s college students.last_img read more

17Jan/21

Borlaug Delivers 2020 Brooks Lecture

first_imgThe elemental message communicated by Julie Borlaug during the 2020 D.W. Brooks Lecture on Nov. 10 was that no child should be born into a world with hunger and famine.Borlaug is vice president of external relations for Inari Agriculture, a seed company using data and biological science to transform plant breeding, and granddaughter of renowned American agronomist Norman Borlaug, who led global initiatives that contributed to the extensive increases in agricultural production referred to as the Green Revolution.Borlaug was the keynote speaker at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ virtual D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards celebration. Five of the college’s most innovative and dedicated faculty members were recognized with the D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence, the college’s highest honor.Gregory Colson, an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, received the D.W. Brooks Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching. He has developed hands-on experiments and games for his classes to reinforce the material and give students a tangible experience to complement his teachings on economic theory.Esther van der Knaap, a professor in the Department of Horticulture and Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, received the D.W. Brooks Faculty Award for Excellence in Research. She has spent much of her career working to understand the genetic shifts that have occurred between ancestral, wild tomato varieties and modern, cultivated tomatoes.Tim Coolong, a professor in the Department of Horticulture, received the D.W. Brooks Faculty Award for Excellence in Extension. Coolong conducts vegetable field research and has worked on a broad variety of topics, from germplasm evaluation to food safety in vegetables to hemp production. He earned his bachelor’s degree in 2000, his master’s degree in 2003 and his doctoral degree in 2007, all from UGA’s Department of Horticulture.Phillip Edwards, a UGA Cooperative Extension county coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Irwin County, received the D.W. Brooks Faculty Award for Excellence in Public Service Extension. Edwards has conducted 139 applied research trials resulting in more than 50 state or national presentations and posters. He earned his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from UGA in 1984.Bob Kemerait, a professor in the Department of Plant Pathology, received the D.W. Brooks Faculty Award for Excellence in Global Programs. He has been a leader in U.S. Agency for International Development-funded projects to improve peanut production among small-scale farmers in Guyana, Haiti and the Philippines and recently received a Fulbright award to work with faculty and farmers in the northern Philippines.“We are delighted to honor these exceptional faculty members,” said Joe West, interim dean and director of CAES. “Each of them brings unique skills that strengthen our discoveries and dissemination of scholarly work through education and outreach programs. They exemplify the quality we strive for as a land-grant college.”This year’s award winners were recognized preceding the D.W. Brooks Lecture.Communication is the key to innovationDuring the lecture, Borlaug said that, to change the discussion in agriculture, it is important to foster acceptance of all of the innovation available, both in developing countries and developed nations.“My grandfather was part of the team that started the Green Revolution. I am asking for a different revolution — a change in the way agriculture is understood and accepted,” said Borlaug, who has developed agricultural partnerships between public, private and philanthropic groups to expand the mission her grandfather embraced. “My grandfather was a warrior against hunger, a mentor, a farmer, but first and foremost, a scientist. He believed that fear of  change was the greatest barrier to progress, and his view of science is that it had to be used in battle against hunger.”Borlaug said it is crucial for technology and innovation in agriculture to be accepted and embraced, from the simplest innovations to the most complex.“In smallholder farmers, mostly female, I have seen firsthand the positive impact of innovation and technology in agriculture. And I am not talking about the highest form of technology. I am talking about the transfer of basic information and technology,” said Borlaug. “We need technology transfer equality. Farmers anywhere in the world deserve the right to have safe technologies.”Borlaug said that communication is key to the acceptance of innovation.“We have had huge changes in agriculture that have not been accepted because we haven’t communicated in a way the general public can understand. Why should the consumer care?” she said.Much of the negative public opinion regarding agriculture has been driven by misconceptions and mistakes that have been made along the way, both things that need to be addressed if the industry is to move forward in a meaningful, effective way.“If you look at my grandfather’s success in the Green Revolution and the agriculture industry, they have made huge strides in the fight against hunger and malnutrition. They also used a lot of fertilizer, but they did it to avert famine. … One thing the industry did in that case, is they self-corrected. Yes, there might have been consequences that weren’t intended, but we always self-correct and we want to do better,” Borlaug said.Part of that strategy to do better is to stop doing “business as usual” in agriculture, she added.“We need to stop talking about yields and … we need to start talking about gene editing and biofortification. We need to talk about how we empower farmers and give them a choice in how they farm. … We need to talk about how we save water. … We need to be honest with ourselves and with the public about what we are doing,” she said. “We also need to stop talking about the short term, the next 10 years, and start talking about the next 100 years.”From advanced weather information systems to drones and smartphones, technology has already begun to revolutionize agriculture.“Farmers in the field can take a picture of wheat rust and upload it, then it goes to CIMMYT (International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, known by its Spanish acronym), those scientists look at it online and decide if it is UG99. If it is, they can mark it and continue to have information about where it has spread and where it is going,” said Borlaug, referring to a type of wheat stem rust that is present in wheat fields in several countries in Africa and the Middle East. The disease is predicted to spread rapidly through these regions and possibly further afield, potentially causing a wheat production disaster that would affect food security worldwide.In order to make technology work to end hunger and poverty, a new generation of leaders need to be welcomed into the industry.“You students need to be given a seat at the table and we need to accept your innovative and out-of-the-box ideas. We need to mentor you but also learn from you,” Borlaug said. “We want to be a catalyst and provide support and belief in the next generation, to give them a seat at the table and a platform for their ideas.”For a video of Borlaug’s full address and for more information about the legacy of D.W. Brooks, visit dwbrooks.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

24Sep/20

Ind. Senator Coats Named “Hero of Main Street”

first_imgCoats (center) receives the award from Grant Monahan of Indiana Retail Council and Steve Thomas, Senior Vice President for Kohl’s Department Stores.WASHINGTON, DC – Senator Dan Coats (R-Ind.) has been named a 2014 Hero of Main Street by the National Retail Federation for advocating federal policies that support the growth of local retailers.“Small businesses are the lifeblood of Indiana’s economy, and we need to encourage them through the right federal policies,” said Coats. “Creating a climate where Main Street can grow and expand will benefit all Hoosiers.”The award is based on voting record, bill sponsorship and efforts to reform the Affordable Care Act and U.S. Tax Code.last_img read more

17Sep/20

USC holds Armenian genocide awareness event

first_imgIn commemoration of the 99th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, USC’s Armenian Students’ Association and the Shoah Foundation hosted the Armenian Genocide Awareness Talk at Tommy Trojan on Thursday.Remembrance · Stephen Smith, the executive director of the Shoah Foundation, served as one of the guest speakers at the Armenian Genocide Awareness Talk, which was held Thursday at Tommy Trojan. – Austin Vogel | Daily TrojanAccording to the Armenian National Institute, the genocide officially began on April 24, 1915, when over 200 Armenian community leaders were apprehended and later executed in Turkey during the reign of the Ottoman Empire. Over the next eight years, approximately one and a half million Armenians were killed. The political party in power in Turkey during this time, commonly referred to as the Young Turks, carried out the killings.The event included two guest speakers — Executive Director of the Shoah Foundation Stephen Smith and criminal defense attorney RJ Manuelian — and music including the bands VIZA, Armenian Public Radio and R-Mean, as well as art installations and food displays. The gathering served as a moment to remember those who were killed in the genocide and reflect on the genocide as a whole.Smith spoke about the world’s reluctance to acknowledge the Armenian genocide.“The world has been in denial,” Smith said. “We owe those who have fallen recognition, not only by the    U.S. but by the world.”He continued to speak directly to the students in the audience about how they must carry on the torch.“The obligation is now passed on to the diaspora of Armenians to remember the genocide,” he said. “The obligation is now passed on to all of you.”Haig Aintablian, president of the Armenian Students’ Association, spoke about his personal experience with the genocide, in which some of his family were victims.“My [great-grandmother] was personally in the Armenian Genocide,” Aintablian said. “I heard stories of it from my grandma, very very horrific stories. I didn’t realize it was something that would affect me until I joined the board of the USC ASA.”Aintablian continued to speak about how awareness of the genocide is highly limited.“Historically it’s so sad not to see it widespread and people don’t know about it,” Aintablian said. “The main thing is for USC students to know about what happened. We’re all going to be the next generation of politicians, the next generation to impact the United States. It’s important that we ourselves are knowledgeable on these important events, especially things like genocide.”Those in attendance found the event to be an important medium for increasing awareness.“This is the largest turnout I’ve ever seen,” said Silva Sevlian, a USC alumna and now full-time employee of the Shoah Foundation. “There is actually a substantial Armenian population here at USC. It’s really an important event for them and the community as a whole.”Mariam Mosinyan, a junior majoring in communication, stressed the need to be privy to the past and present.“It’s part of my heritage and my history — it’s important to be aware of what’s going on in the community and contribute in any way,” Mosinyan said. “If me being here and bringing a couple of my friends who aren’t Armenian to learn about the issue helps in any way, then that’s what I am going to do.”Manuelian, the final speaker, discussed USC’s involvement in the remembrance of the genocide as an important responsibility.“This is a place of learning, where denial cannot take place,” Manuelian said. “Today we are here to remember … Remembrance is the first act of knowledge and knowledge is the first act of ensuring that the denial does not continue.”last_img read more

26Aug/20

Lakers’ D’Angelo Russell moving back to point guard

first_img“If he’s making them, he can take 13,” Scott said, smiling. “What we talked about earlier is to get to those three spots – the post, mid post and elbow area – a little bit more. He can be more effective down there.”Bryant mostly agreed with Scott before resorting to playful sarcasm.“A lot of it was timing and getting a rhythm down,” Bryant said. “Thirteen 3’s are a lot of 3’s. But everybody [complains] when I don’t shoot enough 3’s. A lot of players shoot 15 or 13 3’s. But I’m held to a different standard.”Talking smackLakers forward Julius Randle saw an imposing figure that remains consumed with physically and verbally taunting his opponents. That man also represents one of Randle’s childhood idols. It was Kevin Garnett.But instead of the second-year player cowering under Garnett’s intimidation, Randle confronted the Minnesota forward.“I’m not scared of anybody. That’s what he does, try to get in people’s heads,” Randle said. ““I liked that, though. It gets me going.”Randle’s actions and words sounded pleasant to the Lakers’ ears.“He responded like a grown-ass man. KG has a lot of respect for him because of it,” Bryant said. “He’s laying the foundation. He wants to build his reputation around the league. He’s certainly doing that. He’s not intimidated by anybody.” “I wouldn’t say it took me away from my game,” Russell said. “I just adjusted from being the point guard and then playing off the ball is not foreign to me. I can do that. But in practice, I gained the chemistry with playing with guys on the ball.”Still, Russell obviously prefers playing at point guard. He excelled in that position in his lone season at Ohio State last year where he averaged 19.3 points, 5.7 rebounds and five assists while shooting 41 percent from 3-point range.“It’ll give me the opportunity to control the game a little bit more and let guys like Jordan and Kobe play off the ball,” Russell said. “They can attack when they get the ball. They don’t have to get a rebound or something and push it and make their job harder than what it is.”Live by 3, die by 3Scott took issue with Bryant going 3 of 13 from 3-point range against Minnesota. That marked the most 3-point attempts Bryant took since March 28, 2008. The five men convened at half-court. Lakers coach Byron Scott and guard Kobe Bryant began talking. Lakers rookie guard D’Angelo Russell, second-year guard Jordan Clarkson and second-year forward Julius Randle listened intently. All of which presumably entailed something they had discussed earlier in Thursday’s practice.Scott’s experiment to feature Russell as an off-ball guard will become a one-hit wonder. Russell will start at point guard and assume ball-handling duties when the Lakers (0-1) visit the Sacramento Kings (0-1) on Friday at Sleep Train Arena.“The one thing I have to get D’Angelo to get better at is pushing the tempo,” Scott said. “He’s probably a better decision maker even at 19 years old and it’s his rookie year. So we’ll have him on the ball right now.”Bryant noted “that’s what we brought him here to do” after the Lakers drafted Russell at the No. 2 overall pick. But Scott wanted to lessen Russell’s workload. Yet, Russell posted four points on 2-of-7 shooting and recording more turnovers (three) than assists (two). Russell also did not play in the entire fourth quarter.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

22Nov/19

Jason Brickman thrilled to be finally playing for a Philippine team in ABL

first_imgEthel Booba on SEA Games cauldron: ‘Sulit kung corrupt ang panggatong’ Drilon apologizes to BCDA’s Dizon over false claim on designer of P50-M ‘kaldero’ PBA: Columbian gets back on winning track, clobbers Blackwater Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES The Filipino-American point guard said he was able to get his release papers and reached out to Alab team owner Charlie Dy to be part of the club for the upcoming 2019-20 season.With defending champions CLS Knights not in the league this season, Brickman said the expectations for Alab is to get their second championship since winning the league title in 2018.“I think the expectation is to win the championship,” said Brickman. “They’ve always been a really good team in this league and I think we have high expectations.”“We set the bar really high and try to win a championship for the Philippines again.”ADVERTISEMENT Duterte calls himself, Go, Cayetano ‘the brightest stars’ in PH politics Matteo Guidicelli had saved up for Sarah G’s ring since 2014? View comments Jason Brickman finally suits up for San Miguel Alab Pilipinas. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOMANILA, Philippines—It took some time but Jason Brickman is finally getting a Philippine flag patch on his jersey when he suits up for San Miguel Alab Pilipinas in the ASEAN Basketball League.Brickman, who’s made a name for himself as one of the craftiest playmakers in NCAA Division I history, previously played for Westports Malaysia, Mono, and Bangkok City in his first four seasons in the ABLADVERTISEMENTcenter_img DTI creates Marahuyo, a luxe Filipino fashion brand for global buyers But now, he’s is one of the first Alab Pilipinas players this season as he suits up for coach Jimmy Alapag, regarded as one of the greatest point guards in PBA history.“I’m really excited for the year playing for the Philippines, playing for coach Jimmy,” said Brickman during the league’s season launch Thursday at Conrad Manila. “I think this would be a great season for us.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGreatest ever?SPORTSFormer PBA import Anthony Grundy passes away at 40SPORTSBecoming his own man“I’ve been trying to play with the Philippines for a while now and I think Alab has been in contact with me for a few years, we just haven’t been able to get together and work out a deal.”Brickman, who played for Long Island University in Brooklyn, is just one of four players in Division I history to record 1,000 assists joining Bobby Hurley of Duke, Chris Corchiani of North Carolina State, and Ed Cota of North Carolina This jewelry designer is also an architect MOST READ Becoming his own man Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:11Makabayan bloc defends protesting workers, tells Año to ‘shut up’03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games01:38‘Bato’ to be ‘most effective’ CHR head? It’s for public to decide – Gascon02:07Aquino to Filipinos: Stand up vs abuses before you suffer De Lima’s ordeal01:28Ex-President Noynoy Aquino admits contracting pneumonia00:45Aquino agrees with Drilon on SEA games ‘kaldero’ spending issue Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Canadian vaping study details danger from ‘popcorn lung’ chemicallast_img read more