first_imgFive veteran media personalities will be honoured by Superstakes title sponsors Burger King at Caymanas Park tomorrow for their contribution to the sport over the years.They are The Gleaner’s racing writer Orville Clarke, Lindy Delapenha, a former director of sports at Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation; radio racing analyst and Gleaner columnist Dr. Paul Wright; racing commentator Brian ‘Spuddy” Rickman and Karl Angell of the Racing Observer.All will be guests of the sponsor and promoters Caymanas Track Limited (CTL) in the Director’s Room during the meet and in addition to receiving awards, each will have a race run in their honour on the well supported 12-race programme, featuring the 38th running of the Burger King Superstakes over 2000 metres.The programme kicks off at 11.000 a.m. with the Orville Clarke Trophy over 1700 metres to be contested by nine starters (four-year-olds and up non winners of two). Top contenders are MINY LEE (Shane Ellis), HOMECOMING ((Anthony Thomas) and VESPERS (Javaniel Patterson).The second race over 1100 metres for the Brian Rickman Trophy for maiden three-year-olds has attracted 11 starters, the eighth race for the Dr Paul Wright Trophy to be contested by 14 starters, while race number 10 for the Lindy Delapenha Trophy will see 13 facing the starter and the closing race for the Karl Angell Trophy to be contested by a maximum field of 16.last_img read more

first_img0Shares0000Gareth Bale has shone for Real Madrid this season © AFP / OSCAR DEL POZOMADRID, Spain, Sep 30 – Gareth Bale has been left out of Real Madrid’s squad to face CSKA Moscow in the Champions League on Tuesday.Bale picked up a thigh injury during the goalless draw with Atletico Madrid on Saturday and had to come off at half-time. He will miss the reigning European champions’ Group G game in Russia, along with captain Sergio Ramos, who was also omitted from the squad announced on Sunday.Ramos sustained a cut above his eye against Atletico but, despite briefly leaving the field for treatment, was able to complete the match.Madrid coach Julen Lopetegui said after the game Bale had been replaced as a “precaution” at the Santiago Bernabeu and the Welshman would be assessed on Sunday.The club will be hoping the damage is not serious, with a crunch match against Barcelona in La Liga approaching on October 28.Marcelo and Isco were also absentees from Madrid’s squad to face CSKA. Marcelo has a calf problem while Isco is recovering from an appendix operation.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

first_imgEvery day, billions of viruses are carried by high winds from continent to continent.There’s no escape. Our planet is swarming with viruses. UBC Science describes new measurements from mountaintops in Spain, saying, “An astonishing number of viruses are circulating around the Earth’s atmosphere – and falling from it – according to new research from scientists in Canada, Spain and the U.S.” The number of viruses they found is 9 to 461 times as high as for bacteria carried aloft.“Every day, more than 800 million viruses are deposited per square metre above the planetary boundary layer—that’s 25 viruses for each person in Canada,” said University of British Columbia virologist Curtis Suttle, one of the senior authors of a paper in the International Society for Microbial Ecology Journal that outlines the findings.The viruses are swept up by sea spray and by winds over the land. Carried upward above the clouds, they can be transported across continents before rains and Sahara dust intrusions deposit them back onto the land. This helps explain why genetically identical viruses have been found in different environments around the globe.Evolution News reported that tens of thousands of bacteria live in dust grains carried by clouds. The article asked whether the global transport of biological systems might be necessary for a  planet’s habitability. Another article on Evolution News considered the rich biological communities that live in soil biocrusts. These ecosystems could possibly neutralize some of the static electricity that plagues the planet Mars, the moon, and Saturn’s large moon Titan.For all we know, the dust carrying genetic information around the earth could be for our good. Nature reported that “Dirt yields potent antibiotics.” Some microbes found in soil produce antibiotics able to conquer some of today’s most feared antibiotic-resistant bacteria:One gram of soil contains at least 1,000 bacterial species. To explore the medical potential of that diversity, Sean Brady at the Rockefeller University in New York City and his colleagues analysed roughly 2,000 soil samples collected across the United States. The researchers extracted DNA from the samples and screened it for genetic sequences involved in the production of antibiotics by various bacteria.The search turned up a new family of antibiotics that the team named ‘malacidins’. The compounds kill many formidable pathogens, including a microbe resistant to vancomycin, which is considered to be the antibiotic of last resort. When applied to the skin of rats, the new antibiotics sterilized wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that can ravage large expanses of tissue.There could be acres of diamonds all around us, microbes with cures for disease, inoculating us against the worst infections if we only knew all that these tiny travelers on dust particles are there for.Microbes and viruses live everywhere, from the ocean floor to the high atmosphere. These invisible realities may do far more for the earth than we realize: they may contribute to its habitability. The ubiquity of organisms also indicates that the earth is the Information Planet. Even the clouds “are perfused with huge amounts of complex specified information: the genetic codes of tens of thousands of organisms.”(Visited 309 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgA formerly lost flute concerto by the 18th century Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi, has been reconstituted by a researcher and will debuted yesterday at Scotland’s Perth Concert Hall.The Il Gran Mogol (The Great Mughal), a missing concerto by the composer, was unearthed in Scotland by Andrew Woolley. They were found in the papers of the Marquesses of Lothian, held at the National Archives of Scotland in Edinburgh. 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… curt hopkins Related Posts The whole piece was performed by the British early music ensemble La Serenissima. Hopefully, either the group or the venue will release an accessible online recording of the performance in its entirety. The second violin part was incomplete and was finished by Woolley, a research fellow at Southampton University in the U.K., using the manuscript of another Vivaldi flute concerto, which appears to be a variant of Il Gran Mogol. The other concertos in the “national concertos” quartet to which this piece belongs, La Francia, La Spagna and L’Inghilterro, remain missing. Il Gran Mogol refers to India’s Mughal empire. Vivaldi’s pieces have turned upbefore, so the idea they rest of the quartet’s concertos may eventually be found is not completely out of the question. The reconstructed score will also be on display at a nearby library. 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Tags:#international#music#web last_img read more