first_imgIn an effort to further boost the educational needs of students in Zota District, Bong County, citizens from the district residing in the United States, under the banner, “Kponyekpoyah Development Organization (KDO),” recently donated 24 cartons of textbooks to two schools in the district.The consignment included English, Mathematics, General Science, and Geography books, and different types of dictionaries.The presentation was made to the Belefanai Peace Lutheran Mission and the Gorpudolo Boi schools in Belefanai Town by Livingstone Johnny Gbellai, who served as proxy for KDO president, Harry J. Diggs.Mr. Gbellai told the gathering that the books were sent to Liberia by KDO to buttress efforts the Liberian government has instituted to revamp the country’s education system. He said the books were sent to assist schools in that part of the country to build the students’ respective reading skills.He said the main focus of the group was to assist school-aged children in Liberia to improve in their quest to attain quality education. Mr. Gbellai acknowledged challenges in the education sector, but said as a result, members of KDO were very grateful to the government for its initiative to transform the sector.He then commended the schools’ administrators and parents in the district for the level of support through which the schools have been maintained over the years. He urged the parents to attach seriousness to their children’s education by assisting the teachers in preparing them for the larger society. Receiving the donated items, the administrators of the two schools, Johnson Flomo of Gorpudolo Boi and Reverend Emmanuel Todd of Belefanai Peace Lutheran Mission, commended the organization for the items and promised to use the textbooks for the intended purpose. The two encouraged KDO officials in the US to continue assisting schools in rural Liberia for the growth and development of the country.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgMyanmar press freedom advocates and youth activists hold a demonstration demanding the freedom of two jailed Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo in Yangon. Photo: ReutersSeveral dozen people rallied in central Yangon on Sunday against the jailing of two Reuters journalists, lamenting the shrinking space for free expression in Myanmar despite the advent of civilian rule.Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 28, were sentenced two weeks ago to seven years behind bars under the Official Secrets Act.The judgement sent shockwaves through the country’s nascent community of journalists because it echoed life under the former junta, when the press was heavily censored and reporters routinely jailed.The ruling also sparked a global outcry against Myanmar’s army and against de facto civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi for failing to speak up for the pair.“We are very angry. We are disappointed in the new government. Shame on them,” activist Maung Saung Kha, 25, told AFP.“We condemn the sentence… they should be released.”Protesters released black balloons emblazoned with photos of the two jailed reporters.“The image of the country has been hurt by the court decision,” protester Thin Zar Shun Lei Yi added.While journalists have rallied to the reporters’ cause-some using the hashtag #arrestmetoo-the general public has been apathetic in its response to the verdict.The reporters were arrested in December while investigating the extra-judicial killing by security forces of 10 Rohingya men during last year’s military crackdown against the stateless Muslim minority.The incident was later acknowledged by the army.The UN says a campaign of widespread murder, rape and arson forced more than 700,000 Rohingya to flee over the border into Bangladesh.UN investigators say the violence merits the prosecution of top generals for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.Its rights arm is due to release the full findings of its investigation into the crackdown in coming days.The reporters will appeal against the verdict but the process will likely take many months, if not years.A presidential pardon is also a possibility.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee handed over CESC Shrishti Samman to noted writer Manishankar Mukherjee, popularly known as Shankar, at the inaugural session of the International Kolkata Book Fair organised by the Booksellers’ and Publishers’ Guild on Thursday afternoon.Born in December 1933 at Bongaon, Shankar was the neighbour of Bibhutibhusan Bandopadhyay, author of Pather Panchali. His father Haripada Mukherji moved to Howrah shortly before the second World War, which is where the formative years of the well-known author began. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedFollowing the untimely death of his father in 1947, began the writer’s difficult journey as a street-vendor and then a typewriter cleaner. He was a temporary teacher at Vivekananda Institution and later found a job in a jute broker’s office. In 1951, Shankar met Noel Frederick Barwell, the last British member of the Bar-of-England practising in India. He became his last clerk. In 1954, following the death of Barwell, the author started writing his first book, which was serialised as Kata Ajanare. There has been no looking back for him since and he continues to command an enviable readership in India and abroad. The range of Shankar’s writing is astonishing, from fiction, short story, memoirs and travelogues to his enormously popular books on Vivekananda. One of his biggest best-sellers Chowringhee has been translated in many languages across the world, including English, French, Russian, Italian, Spanish and Chinese. Shankar also enjoys a vast readership in India and Bangladesh across many languages.last_img read more