first_imgBe sure to check out the new layout for the online TFA Merchandise Shop which includes some new items such as the 2006 State of Origin DVD and the Thompson’s Touch Almanac.Also look out for the new official and casual KooGa range of clothing and accessories in the up and coming weeks.To enter please click on the TFA Merchandise link on the left bar.last_img

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool goalscorer Van Dijk: I’ll take clean sheet over goalby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool defender Virgil van Dijk rates the clean sheet ahead of the goal he scored in victory at Wolves last night.om the Dutchman’s point of view, the three points and a shutout are the most important matters arising from another impressive result.“Not at all – I’m more happy that I’m keeping clean sheets with my team and winning games,” Van Dijk told Liverpoolfc.com, when asked if he was frustrated to have gone nearly 12 months without scoring for his club.“Obviously scoring a goal is a bonus and obviously a very proud moment and hopefully there’s more to come, but I’m more focused on winning games.“We are very happy and at the end I am happy with the win. In the first half we were a bit sloppy at times, but second half we did it well and we are very happy that we won.“It’s a very tough place to come with these circumstances and how they play. They have shown throughout the season they are very good and disciplined and they have a clear idea. We knew before and it’s how we reacted to it and in the second half we dominated and created good chances.” last_img read more

first_imgUK video-on-demand regulator ATVOD has ruled that two adult online on-demand services have breached new statutory regulations that ban UK VoD services that carry material that would be banned on DVD. The rulings are the first made by ATVOD under new regulations on prohibited material and come as the body introduced new guidance on the statutory rules it enforces.ATVOD held the two services, Glasgow Mistress Megara Furie and Mistress R’eal, were in breach of two new rules,  respectively requiring that material that would be classified R18 by the BBFC for DVD release could only be made available on UK VoD service if access is blocked to children, and that material that would be refused a classification for DVD release is prohibited on VoD.The Mistress Megara service was closed within three days of notice being brought to the operator’s attention, while ATVOD action against the Mistress R’eal service is ongoing.Separately, ATVOD has ruled against three other adult sites – Lads Next Door, Panties Pulled Down and Montys POV – that failed to put hardcore adult material beyond the reach of children. Lads Next Door has subsequently complied with the requirements for adult services, while the other two services have been referred to Ofcom for consideration of sanctions.last_img read more

first_imgOTT and IPTV technology specialist TV2U is using IBC to unveil its new real-time analytics service and content aggregation engine.It is also showcasing its Intelligent Video Accessible Network (IVAN) white label OTT/IPTV delivery service that unifies the delivery of content straight to the playout device.The company says that a key objective of the IVAN platform is to offer customers the advantage of tapping into real-time analytics, which are gathered from multiple sources including the delivery platform, player applications, and social media.The analytics generate detailed insights about users such as their demographics, location (with the ability to pinpoint their postal code) and viewing habits including their OTT/IPTV technology specialist TV2U is using IBC to unveil its new real-time analytics service and content aggregation engine and is also showcasing its Intelligent Video Accessible Network (IVAN) white label OTT/IPTV delivery service that unifies the delivery of content straight to the playout device.The company says that a key objective of the IVAN platform is to offer customers the advantage of tapping into real-time analytics, which are gathered from multiple sources including the delivery platform, player applications, and social media.The analytics generate detailed insights about users such as their demographics, location (with the ability to pinpoint their postal code) and viewing habits including their content consumption patterns, details on which devices they use, and their likes and dislikes.The real-time analytics engine, lets content owners and advertisers know to what extent customers are engaging with their material, according to the company.TV2U will exhibit at IBC on stand 9.LP12last_img read more

first_imgService provider WiFi technology specialist AirTies has completed its acquisition of Technicolor’s WiFi management software business, also known as Wireless Doctor. AirTies and Technicolor  have also struck a partnership covering technology integrations and sales channels to offer smart WiFi solutions to service providers globally.Bart VercammenBart Vercammen, who previously served as CTO for the CPE business unit of Technicolor and led the Wireless Doctor team, has joined AirTies as EVP and general manager of its software product line. He will report directly to Philippe Alcaras.As part of the acquisition, AirTies takes over the Wireless Doctor software portfolio, related intellectual property and approximately 30 employees from Technicolor. It also gains access to relationships with existing Wireless Doctor customers and partners.Wireless Doctor will be used to complement and integrate features with AirTies’ Remote Manager, its own cloud-based Wi-Fi network management tool that gives broadband service providers real-time visibility into subscribers’ Wi-Fi usage, allowing remote diagnostics and troubleshooting.“The acquisition of Technicolor’s talented team further scales our software development and management capabilities to meet the increasing demand for Smart Wi-Fi,” said Philippe Alcaras, CEO of AirTies.“We’re also very pleased that Bart Vercammen will join our senior leadership team and bring his extensive industry knowledge, skills, and vision to AirTies. We also look forward to our brand-new business relationship with Technicolor, working as mutual preferred partners, to serve operators worldwide.”AirTies agreed the acquisition in January, when CEO Philippe Alcaras told DTVE that the deal would give the company access to millions of homes installed with this technology” and that that the Wireless Doctor technology would extend AirTies’ reach beyond its core market of MESH-based WiFi installations.last_img read more

first_imgHealth care in the U.S. Virgin Islands remains in a critical state, five months after Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria pummeled the region. The only hospital on St. Thomas, the Schneider Regional Medical Center, serves some 55,000 residents between the islands of St. Thomas and St. John. Schneider’s facilities suffered major structural damage, forcing a decrease in its range of services, mass transfers of its patients, staff departures and significant losses in revenue. Only about one-third of the beds are currently available for patient care.In early September, when Irma hit the Virgin Islands, most of Schneider’s staff members were on duty. At the height of the storm, a large window on the hospital’s top floor gave out. “You had winds of 175, 180 miles per hour whipping through here,” says the hospital’s Vice President Darryl Smalls.The screws holding the window in place failed. The window itself, made from hurricane impact glass, remained intact. It’s here, leaning against a nursing station that’s now in shambles. Ceiling panels are gone, exposed pipes and ducts are damaged and sagging in places. A large plywood barrier covers the window opening.When the window tore off, Smalls says the staff worked quickly to evacuate some 20 patients to a safer part of the hospital. They couldn’t use the elevator in the middle of the storm, so staff transported patients from the fourth floor to the third floor using the emergency stairwells. “We literally took the patients on the mattresses, slid them down the stairs, down to the third floor, across the building and up onto the other side,” Smalls says. “We have a surgical unit which was not compromised and capable of handling patient care.”Eventually, all of the patients who were at Schneider during the storm were evacuated off of the island. But even as staff dealt with a host of problems, the hospital remained open. In the emergency room, which flooded badly from a leaky roof, Smalls says, “You probably had about 3 to 4 inches of water on the floor in here. I had pumps. I think we probably had 50 people in here at any given time just trying to evacuate as much water out of the facility.”Today, the hospital continues to provide surgery, labor and delivery care, radiology and lab services. But its cancer center, a $28 million facility, remains closed because of extensive storm damage. The hospital can now only provide limited services for patients requiring dialysis. Meanwhile, Schneider Medical’s sister center, the only hospital on St. Croix, the U.S. Virgin Islands’ other major island, suffered even more extensive damage to its operating rooms.Without adequate medical services available, Schneider Regional CEO Bernard Wheatley says most patients who evacuated St. Thomas have not been able to return. “It’s over 400 that have been transferred off island,” Wheatley says. “And to this day, we’re still transferring some patients, especially the ones requiring extensive length of stay.”Along with the lack of facilities, another major problem is staffing. Wheatley says he’s lost 150 of the hospital’s 600 employees — many of whom left the island after the storms destroyed their homes. “The sad part of it, we’ve lost a lot of nurses,” he says. “If you ask me right now, what’s my key entity in terms of shortages, from a clinical standpoint it would be the nursing staff.” Shanique Woods-Boschulte, who directs Schneider’s foundation says, “Every day we get one or two resignations.” After five months, Woods-Boschulte says, the daily struggle is wearing down many staff members. “The morale was really high after the storm because we saw what we were able to accomplish — no patients hurt,” she says. “But now things are trickling down and everyone is leaving a broken hospital and going home to a broken home.”Adding to the woes, the hospital is in desperate financial straits. Revenues are half of what they were because there are far fewer patients. The government-supported hospital is projecting a $7 million loss.With all the competing problems on the islands, CEO Bernard Wheatley says it’s not clear how much help the local government can provide. “The territory itself is projecting a $400 million loss,” he says. “They don’t have the hotel rooms, tourism is down. It’s just not the same island.”The U.S. Virgin Islands is now looking to Congress to help decide what to do about its battered hospitals. The local government is in talks with FEMA and the Army Corps of Engineers to determine whether the hospitals can be rehabilitated, or if new facilities will be needed. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

first_imgDoctors who are opposed to abortions don’t have to provide them. Since the 1970s, a series of federal rules have provided clinicians with “conscience protections” that help them keep their jobs if they don’t want to perform or assist with the procedure. Religious hospitals are also protected. Catholic health care systems, for example, are protected if they choose not to provide abortions or sterilizations. Doctors who work for religious hospitals usually sign contracts that they’ll uphold religious values in their work. But as the reach of Catholic-affiliated health care grows, these protections are starting to have consequences for doctors who do want to perform abortions — even as a side job.Religious hospitals often prohibit their doctors from performing abortions — even if they do so at unaffiliated clinics, says Noel León, a lawyer with the National Women’s Law Center. León was hired about two years ago to help physicians who want to be abortion providers. They have little in the way of legal protection, she says. “Institutions are using the institutional religious and moral beliefs to interfere with employees’ religious and moral beliefs,” León says. This kind of legal argument, León says, may prevent doctors from providing care they feel called to offer. And since many clinics that provide abortions rely heavily on part-time staff, it may also prevent these clinics from finding the doctors they need to stay open. Dr. Kimberly Remski sought help from León when she was job hunting. She is a primary care physician but had always been interested in women’s health. When she first set foot in a clinic that provides abortions, she realized it was her passion. “A lot of the things we spend our time doing in training are monotonous, or you’re getting swamped in work,” she says. “I just remember leaving the clinic feeling like I was doing something really important.”She interviewed for a job as a primary care doctor with IHA, one of the largest physician groups in Michigan, in 2017. She says she was clear about her desire to work one day a week in an independent clinic that provides abortions. Part-time work is common for outpatient physicians, and Remski says the doctors she interviewed with were receptive. “I was very upfront. I told that them that was a special interest of mine. I wanted to be able to pursue it,” she says. She signed a contract, and started preparing for her move. Then she got a call that the offer was off. Remski learned that her potential employer was actually owned by a larger Catholic hospital network called Trinity Health, and it requires physicians to “provide services in a manner consistent with the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services,” according to her contract. And, she says, she was shocked to learn Trinity Health would also have had a say over how she spent her free time. IHA officials told her that she couldn’t work on the side as an abortion provider if she took the job, Remski says. Trinity Health had merged with IHA in 2010, part of a wave of mergers that has led to a net increase in Catholic ownership of hospitals. According to a 2016 report from MergerWatch, an organization that tracks hospital consolidation, 14.5 percent of acute care hospitals are Catholic-owned or affiliated. That number grew by 22 percent between 2001 and 2016, while the overall number of acute care hospitals dropped by 6 percent. And as Catholic-affiliated health care expands, says León, doctors increasingly encounter morality clauses that prohibit them from performing abortions.León says she has worked with at least 30 physicians and nurse practitioners from 20 different states who faced problems similar to Remski’s when they disclosed to their employers, or potential employers, that they planned to provide abortions. “They’re being told, ‘We can’t provide the care we went into medicine to provide,’ ” León says. “We shouldn’t be putting providers in the position of caring for their patients or keeping their jobs.”Representatives of IHA would not agree to a phone interview about Remski’s situation, but spokesperson Amy Middleton explained in an email that IHA “works hard with our physicians to enable them to pursue other positions.” But, she added, “outside work that interferes with a physician’s ability to serve patients or contradicts the organization’s practices could present a conflict of interest.”IHA physicians follow Catholic health care guidelines, Middleton wrote, which requires that physicians “not promote or condone contraceptive practices.” Dr. Barbara Golder, the editor of the Catholic Medical Association journal, Linacre Quarterly, says that language about morality is ubiquitous in contracts — and that it is reasonable that religious institutions might not want to be associated with abortion providers. “The person is seen primarily as Dr. X of Catholic hospital Y, and then it turns out that Dr. X of Catholic hospital Y is doing abortions on the weekends,” Golder says. “There’s sort of a cognitive dissonance about that. It’s in opposition to what Catholic health care is.”According to Lance Leider, a Florida attorney who has reviewed hundreds of physician contracts, it is “exceedingly common” for contracts, not just at religiously affiliated hospitals, to include language about the reasons an employer can fire a doctor, including but not limited to morality clauses.”There’s always a laundry list of things the employer can terminate the contract for,” Leider says. “There’s usually a catch-all. Anything that calls into question the reputation of the practice.” These clauses tend to be vague, León adds, which means employers can invoke them to prevent a wide range of activities, like political activity, controversial posts on social media or, in religious hospitals, physicians spending time at clinics that provide abortions. The restrictions may have ramifications not only for physicians but for many clinics that provide abortions. Smaller clinics may be staffed almost entirely with part-time doctors, and when they can’t find enough, they’re sometimes left unable to meet the demand for services. “We don’t have full-time doctors,” says Shelly Miller, the executive director of Scotsdale Women’s Center in Detroit, one of the clinics where Remski worked. “We really cannot afford to have a provider sit here all day and wait for patients to come in.” Through her involvement with the National Abortion Federation, Miller often talks with other directors of small clinics that provide abortions and sometimes other women’s health services. She says that many of her counterparts say they exclusively hire part-time physicians because they simply don’t need somebody full time. If more physicians are prohibited from part-time abortion work, it may put some smaller clinics out of business, Miller worries.It’s hard to know exactly how many of these clinics primarily use part-time staff, according to Rachel Jones, who studies the demographics of U.S. abortion services at the Guttmacher Institute, a family planning research organization. Ninety-five percent of abortions take place in clinics as opposed to hospitals, Jones notes, which may be more likely to utilize a team of part-time staff. León doesn’t have data to show how common it is for physicians to be threatened with termination for providing abortions. She guesses that doctors will either give up on providing abortions — or, like Remski did, look for a different job that allows them to. León spends much of her time speaking to groups of doctors about how to approach contract negotiation if they want to provide abortions. Ultimately, Remski says, she parted amicably from IHA, since “it felt like the wrong place for me.” She ended up finding a job at an urgent-care clinic in Michigan, which allowed her to work part time at three separate clinics that provide abortions. She has since moved to Chicago, where she also splits her time between providing abortions and primary care. “I was providing a service that was needed and necessary,” Remski says. “I realized it was something I really needed to do.” Mara Gordon is a family physician in Washington, D.C., and a health and media fellow at NPR and Georgetown University School of Medicine. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

first_imgCampaigners have questioned a series of claims by the minister for disabled people that there have been substantial improvements to major government disability programmes.Justin Tomlinson, who was appointed to the post in May, spoke this afternoon (Thursday) to two separate audiences of disabled people and campaigners.He claimed there had been substantial improvements to the Access to Work (AtW) scheme, and in the programme to introduce personal independence payment (PIP).He also attempted to justify government plans to cut £29 a week from the benefits of new claimants of employment and support allowance (ESA) placed in the work-related activity group (WRAG) from April 2017.Tomlinson first addressed a joint meeting of the all-party parliamentary disability group (APPDG) and the all-party parliamentary group on learning disability in Westminster, before heading across London to speak at the annual meeting of Disability Rights UK.He told the APPDG there had been “clear improvements” to AtW, with his department “speeding up the process” and increasing awareness of the scheme among small and medium-sized businesses.He also said there had been a “dramatic turnaround” in the PIP claim system, with four times more assessors, 200 more assessment centres, centres opening for longer hours and “improved communications with claimants”.He later told the DR UK event that PIP had had a “terrible start”, with a “terrible claimant journey”, but that “we have transformed it”.But he said he was “not complacent” and would ensure that the reassessment process of 1.3 million people on long-term disability living allowance, now underway, would proceed in “a controlled and measured way”, with weekly checks on how the system was coping so that this final stage of the PIP roll-out does not “compromise quality”.He attempted to justify the WRAG cut – which will see £640 million a year cut from disabled people’s benefits – by highlighting that only one per cent of those in the WRAG find sustainable work every month.He said there was “no way of describing that as anything other than unacceptable”, and said later that the WRAG top-up “was not meant to be an income boost”.He said: “That was not the intention when it was brought in. It was to provide direct support to get you into work.”Tomlinson told the APPDG that eventually an extra £100 million a year of those WRAG savings would be spent on employment support for disabled people.But Tomlinson’s claims were repeatedly disputed by disabled people and disability organisations who attended the two events.Tom Hendrie, from Cheshire Centre for Independent Living, told Tomlinson at the DR UK event: “A number of members are concerned about the way changes to local authority funding, the end of the Independent Living Fund, changes to benefits, have all come together in a perfect storm.”He asked if Tomlinson would encourage ministerial colleagues to attempt an assessment of the cumulative impact of all of the government’s reforms and cuts.Andrew Lee (pictured), director of policy and campaigns at People First Self-Advocacy, said at the APPDG: “I hear a lot about the government wanting more people to be in work, but as a person with learning difficulties myself, my experience is actually that there are more and more barriers to employment for disabled people.“The way the changes to Access to Work are hitting people with learning difficulties is one thing I know.”He said cuts to social care had forced him to cut his work hours so he could support his disabled wife.Lee said: “We do not get any support with things like form-filling, so we are running around everywhere trying to find someone to help us fill in our benefits assessment forms.”Mike Smith, chief executive of the London disabled people’s organisation Real, and former disability commissioner at the Equality and Human Rights Commission, asked Tomlinson at the DR UK event why the need for a national AtW scheme did not also apply to the Independent Living Fund, which the government closed in order to pass its funding to local authorities.Tomlinson did not appear to answer that question.Rebecca, a young disabled woman who spoke at the APPDG meeting, described her own experiences of claiming ESA and the difficulty of finding work, and said that cutting WRAG payments “could make life even more difficult for disabled people”.She said: “I need the money. Without it, I struggle.”She added: “I applied for so many jobs but I keep getting letters back saying they cannot accept me. I think it’s because I have a disability.“I find it really hard to have to explain that I could actually do the work.”Victoria Holloway, co-chair of the Disability Benefits Consortium, told Tomlinson at the APPDG that there was “no evidence whatsoever” that cutting WRAG payments would incentivise disabled people to find work.She said the move would instead move them further from the workplace, could mean people were unable to meet their essential living costs, and might even put some people’s recovery from ill-health at risk.A Mencap representative later asked Tomlinson for the evidence that cutting WRAG payments would “incentivise” disabled people to find work.He failed to make any reference to such evidence in his reply, but appeared to claim that the “incentive” was the extra money that would be available for employment support for disabled people.Gordon McFadden, chair of United Amputees, raised concerns about the quality of PIP assessments, and said that one contractor had been advertising for paramedics to carry out the tests, in addition to physiotherapists, nurses and doctors.McFadden told Disability News Service after the APPDG meeting that he had supported two people, both of whom had had both their legs amputated and were still turned down for the enhanced mobility rate of PIP, and told their Motability vehicles would be removed. Both decisions were only over-turned after McFadden became involved in their cases.Asked at the DR UK event whether he would look again at the decision to slash the qualifying distance for the enhanced rate of PIP mobility support from 50 metres to just 20 metres, Tomlinson said the department had “incredibly bright medical advisors who advise on the way of doing things”.He added: “We feel, based on the advice we have been given, it is the right thing to do but I recognise that most of you in the room do not [share that view].”Natalie McGarry, the SNP’s disability spokeswoman, told Tomlinson at the APPDG that disabled people placed in the WRAG had “already been found not fit for work”, and she told him that the government had apparently “not learned anything” from its failure to carry out preparatory work before the introduction of the bedroom tax.She said: “You are making their lives significantly more difficult but you are not changing their conditions, the barriers to work, or the work for people to get into.” And Labour’s shadow minister for disabled people, Debbie Abrahams, told the DR UK event, after Tomlinson’s departure: “As much as the minister provided a relatively rosy picture, I do not quite see things as he did.”She said she believed the cumulative impact of the new welfare reform and work bill on disabled people would be “very severe”.last_img read more

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Franz BrotzenPHONE: 713-348-6775E-MAIL: franz.brotzen@rice.edu‘Intellectual Salon’ engages Rice students in discussions with religious leadersRice University students in the Religion and Public Life class taught by sociologist D. Michael Lindsay have been introduced to an array of local religious leaders in a unique format that encourages intelligent conversation. Called “intellectual salons,” the sessions were sponsored by the Brown Foundation Teaching Grants Program. Guest speakers who addressed the classes included Samuel Karff. rabbi emeritus of Congregation Beth Israel; Duane Brooks, pastor of Tallowood Baptist Church; and Mahmoud El-Gamal, a professor of economics at Rice who preaches at his mosque.  Lindsay’s class examines the place of religion in various parts of public life, including medicine, education, politics and the economy.  In developing the “intellectual salon,” Lindsay was concerned that students have “very few structured environments in which they can practice the art of intelligent conversation.” The discussions were held at the Rice University president’s house and the houses of masters of the university’s residential colleges rather than in classrooms. Lindsay, assistant professor of sociology and assistant director of Rice’s Center on Race, Religion and Urban Life, said the interdisciplinary program will help build better relations with the wider Houston community.last_img read more

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 26 2019For decades, manmade chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, were used in everything from carpets to frying pans to firefighting chemicals for their ability to repel water and oil. That was before a wide array of negative health effects ranging from cancer and low birth weights to effects on the immune system were discovered in some kinds of PFAS.The Environmental Protection Agency places health-based limits on the concentration of contaminants allowed in drinking water. The federal limit for arsenic in drinking water is 10 parts per billion. The federal limit for perchloroethene, a chemical associated with several types of cancer, is 5 parts per billion. The federal health advisory limit for the sum of both PFOS and PFOA – two widely used types of PFAS – is many times more stringent at 70 parts per trillion. One part per trillion is equal to one drop of water in the combined volume of 20 Olympic-size swimming pools.”Not only are the chemicals everywhere, and bad, but the advisory level established by the EPA is so extremely low that it makes it even more challenging to treat them,” said Reyes Sierra, a chemical and environmental engineering professor who is affiliated with the UA’s Institute of the Environment. “The University of Arizona is doing something about it.”Using a $1.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Reyes is leading a team in developing a new method for removing PFAS contaminants from groundwater. This research is particularly timely in light of PFAS levels of 30 parts per trillion being found in parts of Tucson’s water supply in late 2018, according to reporting by the Arizona Daily Star. Thirty parts per trillion is below the EPA advisory level, but almost double the level a June 2018 study by the federal Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry found advisable for drinking. These chemicals’ presence in firefighting chemicals means they often are found on military bases and in adjacent groundwater – in this case, in water wells north of Tucson’s Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.Sierra’s co-principal investigators are: Jim Field, a professor in chemical and environmental engineering and the College of Engineering’s assistant dean for graduate education; Jon Chorover, professor and department head for Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Leif M. Abrell, an associate research scientist in Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences; and Jim Hatton, a senior engineer and principal technologist with Jacobs Engineering Group, a global engineering company.Identifying ‘Super Sorbents’One of the most widely applied methods for treating hazardous contaminants in groundwater is granular activated carbon, or GAC, adsorption. In GAC adsorption, combusted organic materials similar to coal attract groundwater contaminants through sorption, a chemical process in which one substance – the contaminant – becomes attached to another – the sorbent.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedIf you’ve ever looked inside the filter for the kind of water pitcher you keep in a refrigerator, you might have seen a fine substance that looks like black sand. That’s GAC; however, GAC’s affinity for PFAS isn’t especially high, so scientists have to use a lot of it to remove a sufficient amount of PFAS from water, making it an expensive option.Sierra’s team plans to use a new class of sorbents that will attract PFAS more strongly than GAC. These sorbents also will be more customizable in their ability to bond to specific kinds of PFAS. In the early phases of the project, the research team is working with simulated groundwater they make themselves, and which includes other contaminants besides PFAS, to make sure the presence of more than one contaminant doesn’t interfere with their method.”As we move forward, we’re going to bring contaminated water in from two military bases,” Sierra said. “Once we select the sorbents that work the best, then we’ll move on to test them in the very realistic conditions, in which we’ll use actual groundwater.”Planning Ahead for PurificationThis new treatment method is first being developed for a common type of groundwater treatment in which water is purified by pumping it through the sorbents. But it also will have potential applications to a form of treatment in which sorbents are added directly to the groundwater source.Sierra and her team also are testing their sorbents’ effectiveness in treating several other potentially hazardous PFAS chemicals that are receiving increasing attention from regulatory agencies and which may be monitored by the EPA in the future. They hope their forward thinking will improve water safety for both Tucsonans and people throughout the world well into the future.”This is why I do my work,” Sierra said. “Environmental engineering research is an area in which you can really see the benefit. It’s meaningful.””As anyone who lives in the desert knows, ensuring the safety of drinking water is a vital priority,” said UA President Robert C. Robbins. “But access to safe drinking water does not just affect Tucson and the U.S. Southwest, and Dr. Sierra and her team are working to ensure a bright future for people around the world as they develop this new treatment method. This could be a significant advancement in removing contaminants that pose serious health risks, and I look forward to watching their progress.” Source:https://uanews.arizona.edu/story/ua-engineers-use-12m-grant-make-drinking-water-saferlast_img read more

first_img Discovery in Greece The two ancient skulls were unearthed in the late 1970s by researchers at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Athens. Given that the skulls were found in Apidima Cave, the researchers named them Apidima 1 and Apidima 2. Both skulls, neither of which had a lower jaw, were found side by side in a block of breccia, angular pieces of rock that were cemented together over time. However, neither skull was in good shape; the damaged Apidima 1 included only the back of the skull, and at the time, researchers weren’t sure what species it came from. Apidima 2, which preserved the facial region of the skull, was identified as Neanderthal, but it was broken and distorted. For years, the skulls sat at the Museum of Anthropology in Athens until they were finally cleaned and prepared from the breccia block in the late 1990s and early 2000s. In the new study, Harvati and her colleagues put both skulls in a CT scanner, which generated 3D virtual reconstructions of each specimen. Then, they analyzed the features of each. As in previous analyses, the team concluded that Apidima 2, which had a thick, rounded brow ridge, was from an early Neanderthal. Identifying Apidima 1 was more challenging because of its fragmentary remains, but the researchers were able to create mirror images of its right and left sides, which gave them a more complete reconstruction. [In Photos: Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever Found] Several clues, such as the rounded back of the skull (a feature unique to modern humans), indicated that Apidima 1 was an early modern human, or Homo sapiens, the researchers said. Dating the skulls Next, the researchers dated the skulls. Previous analyses had estimated that the skulls were roughly from the same time period, given that they were discovered next to each other, suggesting that they lived around the same time. But by using a method known as uranium-series dating, the new team found that the skulls were not from the same time period. At 170,000 years old, the Neanderthal skull fit within the range of other Neanderthal remains found in other parts of Europe. But the modern human skull was an unexpected outlier, predating the next-oldest H. sapiens remains in Europe by more than 150,000 years, the researchers found. Uranium-series dating is one of only a few ways to date such ancient bones, “but it’s not without some pitfalls,” said Larry Edwards, regents professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Minnesota, who was not involved in the study. In effect, the method works because uranium decays into thorium. The more thorium there is in a sample, the older it is, Edwards told Live Science. However, bones and teeth don’t contain much of their own uranium; rather, they absorb it from the environment over time. “That then requires you to make interpretations on how and when the uranium was picked up and whether or not the uranium was lost,” he said. But although this technique isn’t ideal for dating skulls such as Apidima 1 and 2, it can still provide useful data, Edwards said. “I think it’s pretty solid, their [dating] conclusions,” he said. Out-of-Africa implications Despite the skull’s title as the “oldest known modern human fossil in Eurasia,” the new finding does not rewrite the fundamentals of human evolution, said Eleanor Scerri, an associate professor and leader of the Pan-African Evolution research group at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, who was not involved in the study. Those fundamentals are that humans first evolved in Africa and then ventured out into the rest of the world. “The oldest human fossils still come from Africa and are about 100,000 years older than the Apidima fossil,” Scerri told Live Science in an email. “That is roughly 4,000 generations — ample opportunity to move around.” That said, “if we want to ask questions specifically about the early history of our species in Eurasia, then this study may confirm the arguments made for multiple, early dispersals,” Scerri said. In addition, this finding supports the view that the population of “early Homo sapiens was fragmented and dispersed,” she said. [Top 10 Mysteries of the First Humans] Previous studies have suggested that “Homo sapiens left Africa every time the Saharan and Arabian deserts shrunk, which happened broadly on 100,000-year cycles,” roughly agreeing with dates from this study, she noted. What’s more, if modern humans truly had reached Eurasia by at least 210,000 years ago, then “we can no longer assume that ‘Mousterian’ stone tool assemblages found across large regions of Eurasia are necessarily being produced by Neanderthals,” she said. There are many avenues open to researchers hoping to learn more about the Apidima skulls. For instance, the skulls could contain ancient DNA or primordial proteins that could verify their species, Eric Delson, who was not involved with the research, wrote in an accompanying perspective published online today (July 10) in the journal Nature. Delson is a professor and the chair of the Department of Anthropology at Lehman College and The Graduate Center at the City University of New York. Moreover, researchers could study the cave’s paleo-environment and climate to figure out what conditions were like when Apidima 1 and 2 lived there. Today, the cave is on a cliff facing the sea, reachable only by boat, Harvati said. The study was published online today in the journal Nature. A prehistoric, broken skull is revealing the secrets of ancient humans, divulging that early modern humans left Africa much earlier than previously thought, a new study finds. The skull, found in Eurasia and dating back 210,000 years, is the oldest modern human bone that anthropologists have discovered outside Africa, the researchers said. This skull, however, had an unusual neighbor: a 170,000-year-old, possibly Neanderthal skull that was found resting next to it, in a cave in southern Greece. Given that the Neanderthal skull is a solid 40,000 years younger than the modern human skull, it appears that this particular human’s early dispersal out of Africa failed. There are no living descendants of this enigmatic human alive today, and this person’s group was replaced by Neanderthals, who later lived in that very same cave, the researchers said. [Photos: See the Ancient Faces of a Man-Bun-Wearing Bloke and a Neanderthal Woman]These Sharks Were Too Busy to Notice a Bigger Predator Watching ThemThe unexpected twist at the end of this feeding frenzy delighted scientists.Credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really Loud00:35关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65906-oldest-modern-human-skull-eurasia.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2802:28  “We know from the genetic evidence that all humans that are alive today outside of Africa can trace their ancestry to the major dispersal out of Africa that happened between 70[,000] and 50,000 years before present,” study lead researcher Katerina Harvati, a professor of paleoanthropology at the University of Tübingen in Germany, told reporters at a news conference. Other earlier modern-human dispersals out of Africa have been documented at sites in Israel, including one based on the discovery of a 194,000- to 177,000-year-old modern human jaw from Misliya Cave and others tied to early human fossils dated to about 130,000 to 90,000 years ago at the Skhul and Qafzeh caves. But “we think that these early migrants did not actually contribute to modern humans living outside of Africa today, but rather died out and were probably locally replaced by Neanderthals,” Harvati said. “We hypothesize this is a similar situation with the Apidima 1 [the newly dated modern human skull] population.” In Photos: Bones from a Denisovan-Neanderthal Hybrid Originally published on Live Science. This is the oldest known modern human skull in Eurasia, dating to about 210,000 years ago. Here, you can see the partial skull (right), its virtual reconstruction (middle) and a virtual side view. Credit: Copyright Katerina Harvati/Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen Photos: Newfound Ancient Human Relative Discovered in Philippines Photos: Looking for Extinct Humans in Ancient Cave Mudlast_img read more

first_imgNational Herald case: HC dismisses pleas of Sonia, Rahul challenging reopening of tax assessment RELATED SC refuses to quash National Herald case politics The Central Bureau of Investigation has named former Haryana Chief Minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda as an accused in the chargesheet filed in the AJL-National Herald Panchkula land grab scam.Hooda is accused of misusing his position as then Chief Minister of Haryana to cause unlawful gains to the Associated Journals Limited (AJL) and corresponding loss to the Government of Haryana. Hooda, who was also the then chairman of the Haryana Urban Development Authority, is accused of illegally allotting a government plot of land for ₹ 59 lakh to AJL. The actual cost of the land is estimated to be worth several crores rupees.A CBI statement said, “The CBI has today filed a Charge Sheet Under section 120-B of  IPC, 420 of IPC and section 13 (2) read with 13 (1) (d) of PC Act in the Court of Special Judge, CBI cases, Panchkula(Haryana) against Bhupinder Singh Hooda, the then Chairman, HUDA (then CM), Haryana; Motilal Vora, then Chairman, M/s Associated Journals Ltd. and M/s Associated Journals Ltd  in a case relating to an  alleged re-allotment of institutional plot No.C-17, Sector-6, Panchkula to M/s. AJL.”Further investigation is continuing, the CBI said. December 01, 2018 Published on CBI charge-sheets Hooda in ₹1,500-crore Manesar land case COMMENT Bhupinder Singh Hooda, former Haryana chief minister   –  THE HINDU SHARE SHARE EMAIL National Herald case: Subramanian Swamy records his statement in Delhi court crime, law and justice SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more