first_imgWBA and IBF heavyweight boxing champion Anthony Joshua. File photo.BOXING–British heavyweight Anthony Joshua’s unification fight against Joseph Parker could be confirmed this week.New Zealander Parker’s promoter David Higgins is due in London on Monday, when he will finalise the deal with the 28-year-old’s promoter Eddie Hearn.The signing of contracts is understood to be imminent and Parker, 25, could then travel to the UK later this week.Reports suggest the contest will take place on 31 March, with Cardiff’s Principality Stadium the likely venue.The camps reached a proceeds deal for the fight in December last year.Joshua is seeking to add Parker’s WBO crown to his WBA and IBF titles before a possible meeting with American WBC champion Deontay Wilder.Negotiations for the showdown have been drawn out but are extremely close to a conclusion, with WBO champion Parker understood to have settled for around 33 per cent of the fight purse.Joshua, the IBF and WBA title holder, stands to make in the region of £15m for his first fight of 2018, with up to two more bouts lined up for this year.The Principality Stadium in Cardiff is expected to be confirmed as the venue for the fight, seeing a return to Wales for Joshua after he stopped Carlos Takam under the roof in Wales in October, maintaining his 20-fight unbeaten record.WBO champion Joseph Parker. File photo.Parker will be a significant challenge, even if Joshua will be a strong favourite.The New Zealander has won all 24 of his fights, 18 by knockout. But he looked desperately underwhelming in beating Hughie Fury by majority decision in Manchester last year.No boxer has held all four heavyweight belts simultaneously.Commentslast_img read more

first_imgThe Panthers, … The Panthers and Warriors appear to be on a collision course.The top two teams in the Big 5 are each a perfect 6-0 midway through the league campaign, and scheduled to meet in a crucial three-game series next week.And that’s a series that looks increasingly likely to decide the fate of the league championship.Thus far, the Panthers have taken care of business, sweeping three-game stands with Arcata and Fortuna, while boasting an impressive overall record of 14-3.last_img read more

first_img21 December 2011In 2011 South Africa’s national cricket team, the Proteas, produced some superb performances, but, ultimately, the sum of the team’s parts failed to deliver what they could have.Considering that the side featured the world’s leading test bowler, Dale Steyn, and the man third in the rankings, Morne Morkel, along with the great Jacques Kallis, and other outstanding batsmen in Hashim Amla and AB de Villiers, who were one and two in one-day international batting rankings, it should have achieved more.Against both India and Australia, they drew test series after taking the series lead with dominant victories that suggested they had a clear edge on the opposition.World CupAs it was for every major cricket playing nation, 2011 was a big year for South African cricket because of the World Cup, which was hosted by India. It was also an opportunity for the Proteas to undo many past disappointments by claiming the Cup.Unfortunately for South African fans, the World Cup once again ended in bitter disappointment.In the round robin phase, the Proteas were in fine form in Group B, winning five out of six matches to convincingly top the standings.They beat the West Indies by seven wickets, the Netherlands by 231 runs, eventual champions India by three wickets, Ireland by 131 runs, and Bangladesh by 206 runs. A warning was sounded, however, when the Proteas lost to England by six runs when chasing only 172 for victory.As the number one team in Group B, South Africa faced the fourth placed team from Group A in the quarterfinals, which turned out to be New Zealand. The Proteas failed to fire in an ill-tempered match and were well beaten by 49 runs.Spinners’ successSpinners Robin Petersen and Imran Tahir provided some light, however, finishing near the top of the list among wicket takers, with 15 and 14 respectively.Petersen averaged only 15.86 per wicket, while Tahir’s average was an astounding 10.71, the best in the tournament. His strike rate of a wicket every 16.9 balls also led all bowlers. And he was among the best when it came to exuberant wicket taking celebrations.AB de Villiers led the batsmen, despite playing in just five games because of injury, totalling 353 runs at 88.25, with centuries in successive matches against the West Indies and the Netherlands.A number of South Africans did, however, taste success at the World Cup, with India coach Gary Kirsten and his support staff leading the hosts to the title. Later in the year, Kirsten was appointed coach of the Proteas.Innings’ victoryAmong the other highlights of the year were South Africa’s victory by an innings and 25 runs over India at Centurion. In that match, Morne Morkel knocked over 5 for 20 and Dale Steyn captured 3 for 34 as the Indians mustered only 136 in their first innings.Jacques Kallis then scored a maiden test double century, finishing on 201 not out, while Hashim Amla weighed in with 140 and De Villiers with 129, as South Africa declared on a massive 620 for 4.India fought hard to score 459 in their second innings behind Sachin Tendulkar’s 50th test century, but it wasn’t enough to prevent a comprehensive South African victory.AmazingIn November, one of the most amazing test matches ever took place at Newlands. Batting first, the visitors, Australia, posted 284 all out, thanks to a splendid 151 from captain Michael Clarke.South Africa, in reply, were skittled out for just 96 as only the openers, Jacques Rudolph and Graeme Smith, reached double figures. Shane Watson excelled with the ball, taking 5 for 17.The Aussies began their second innings with a seemingly insurmountable lead of 188 runs. Incredibly, though, they were blasted out for only 47, having at one stage been on 21 for 9! Debutant Vernon Philander finished with figures of 5 for 15, while Morne Morkel took 3 for 9, and Steyn 2 for 23.South Africa then made the pitch look relatively easy, chasing down the victory target for the loss of only two wickets to win the match inside three days. Smith struck 101 not out, while Amla contributed 112.ResultsIn other results, a two-test series against Pakistan in late 2010 was drawn 0-0, the Indian series finished 1-1, as did the Australian series.The Proteas edged a five-match one-day international series against Pakistan 3-2, won 3-2 against India, and lost 2-1 to Australia.The Aussies also beat the Proteas 2-1 in a Twenty20 international series. South Africa won 2-0 against Pakistan in the shortest form of the game and lost their only T20 against India.Player of the YearIn 2011, Jacques Kallis, South Africa’s Player of the Year, passed 12 000 runs in tests, placing him fourth on the all-time list, with a higher average than the three men above him. After a two-test series against Australia, he had also claimed 271 test wickets, good for 28th all time, and fourth on the South African list of wicket takers.With 169 catches, he is also sixth on the all-time list among fielders. Clearly, the term “great” is not misplaced in this instance.Dale Steyn achieved a milestone when he went over the 900 point mark – an achievement similar to the four-minute mile in athletics – in the test bowling rankings.He remains far and away the leading test bowler in the world, a massive 87 points ahead of the man in second place on the list, England fast bowler James Anderson.South African Sports Star of the YearHashim Amla proved to be one of the most popular sportsmen in the country and was voted South African Sports Star of the Year in August.In domestic action, the Cape Cobras won the SuperSport Series four-day competition, while the Knights triumphed in the 40-overs-a-side MTN40.The Cobras added another title in the Standard Bank Pro20 Series, while the Warriors finished runners-up in the Champions League T20, a competition featuring the best T20 provincial teams from around the world.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? 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first_img2 April 2012South Africa’s Burry Stander and Swiss star Christoph Sauser successfully defended their Absa Cape Epic title in Lourensford in the Western Cape on Sunday after dominating the eight-day, seven-stage event from start to finish. The all-South African duo of Kevin Evans and David George placed second.Sunday’s final stage wasn’t the procession it was expected to be as the defending champions and overall leaders attacked their rivals on the 64km leg from Oak Valley to Lourensford to win their sixth out of seven stages.The 36One-Songo-Specialized pair broke clear of the lead group just before the Telkom Hot Spot, won the R10 000 cash prize for being first across the prime, and then continued to power away up the steep climb that followed.South African flagThey then carried a relentless pace to the finish, where Stander, on the final approach, grabbed a South African flag, which he carried proudly across the finish line.Second place on the day went to the Topeak Ergon duo of Alban Lakata (Aut) and Robert Mennen (Ger) who pipped Songo-Specialized’s Max Knox (RSA) and Kohei Yamamoto (Jpn) in the sprint for second place, just less than a minute down on Stander and Sauser.Stander and Sauser’s sixth stage win in eight days confirmed their dominance at the ninth edition of the world’s most prestigious mountain bike stage race.Third victoryIt was also Sauser’s third victory in the event, his other having come in 2006 with compatriot Silvio Bundi. Stander is the only South African to have won the overall Cape Epic title. His total of 20 career stage wins is second only to Sauser, who has 26 to his name.Nedbank 360Life’s Kevin Evans and David George were fifth on the final stage, but secured second place on the General Classification, the highest ever placing by a South African team in the event. They also won the Absa African Team competition. Hannes Genze (Ger) and Andreas Kugler (Sui) of Team Multivan Merida, were third overall.Unlike many of their rivals, Stander and Sauser had an incident-free eight days, which is virtually unheard of in a race that covers such rugged terrain and features such varied weather conditions as this year’s edition, which included intense heat, gale force winds and driving rain.Rode on the front’“We simply rode on the front for about 80% of the entire race and stayed out of trouble,” said Stander afterwards.“When you ride on the front you can pick your line and avoid possible problems. When you follow someone else, you can’t anticipate what’s coming. I felt so much more in control riding on the front more this year.“We worked hard for this stage and the overall,” he added. “We will never say no to the opportunity of winning a stage. Twenty-seven minutes is a big victory margin, but not only thanks to us. Our whole team and our equipment played a role.‘Nothing compares to it’“We learnt our lessons in previous years. The Absa Cape Epic is a story. Every day is a chapter and that makes it so amazing. Now we know the Yellow Jersey is ours. Until now it felt like we were borrowing it. Nothing compares to it.”The only other South Africans to win a category were the Team Contego 28E pairing of Erik and Ariane Kleinhans. The married couple won the Mixed category title overall and collected seven stage wins in the process.They were by far the most dominant Mixed team in the race with an eventual winning margin of two hours and seven minutes over runners up Udo Bolts (Ger) and Milena Landtwing (Sui) of Team Centurion Vaude. Bolts won the Master’s division last year and is a former top-10 finisher at the Tour de France.Masters winnersFormer World and Olympic champion and 2005 Cape Epic winner, Bart Brentjens (Ned) and his compatriot Jan Weevers of the World Bicycle Relief team won the Telkom Masters (over-40) category. They were followed by two all-South African teams – Delaney Impey and Adrian Enthoven (JAG Craft) and Scott McKenzie and Warren Squires (Complete Cyclist), in second and third respectively.The women’s division was dominated by the Wheels4Life team of Sally Bigham (GBR) and Esther Suss (Sui), who won all seven stages and the overall title. South African Theresa Ralph and her Norwegian partner Nina Gassler were second, while another South African, Karien van Jaarsveld, and her Swiss teammate, Jane Nuessli of Team MTN Qhubeka, were third.A total of 604 two-rider teams started the 781km, eight-day race, with 481 teams finishing and 93 solo riders completing the event after their partners withdrew.RESULTSMEN 1. Burry Stander (RSA)/Christoph Sauser (Sui) 36One-Songo-Specialized2. Kevin Evans (RSA)/David George (RSA) Nedbank 360Life3. Hannes Genze (Ger)/Andreas Kugler (Sui) Multivan Merida4. Thomas Dietsche (Fra)/Tim Boehme (Ger) Bulls 25. Alban Lakata (Aut)/Robert Mennen (Ger) Topeak Ergon WOMEN 1.Esther Suss (Sui)/Sally Bigham (GBR) Wheels4Life2. Theresa Ralph (RSA)/Nina Gassler (Nor) Biogen Britehouse3. Karien van Jaarsveld (RSA)/Jane Nuessli (Sui) MTN Qhubeka MASTERS 1. Bart Brentjens (Ned)/Jan Weevers (Ned) World Bicycle Relief2. Adrian Enthoven (RSA)/Delaney Impey (RSA) JAG Craft3. Warren Squires (RSA)/Scott McKenzie (RSA) Complete Cyclist MIXED 1. Erik Kleinhans (RSA)/Ariane Kleinhans (RSA) Contego 28E2. Udo Bolts (Ger)/Milena Landtwing (Sui) Centurion Vaude3 Klaas van Moortel (Bel)/Inne Gantois (Bel) BAIL Peak Performance Brugge SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgCEOs Know Campaign: The Johannesburg Stock ExchangeTsabeng Nthite – Inspired by the need to build a positive  reputation for South Africa, Brand South Africa – through its digital campaign themed ‘CEOs Know’ this week interviewed Ms Nicki Newton-King, the CEO of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) who shared her thoughts on why the JSE leads by example.“We are really proud of the way the JSE leads by example, we have world class financial markets in a developing economy – something that takes many of our international clients by quite considerable surprise. The JSE is also one of the world’s top 20 equity markets, one of the world’s top 10 derivatives markets, and one of the world’s top 5 bond markets.”The CEOs Know campaign is in  collaboration with Business Leadership South Africa  and aims to position South Africa as in ideal investment destination. The CEOs Know Campaign features various CEO’s from  multinational corporations based in South Africa, who share insights behind their continued investment into South Africa.The JSE continues to dominate the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region, representing 38% of all listed companies and 83% of total market capitalisation in the region in 2012. In fact, 68 of sub-Saharan Africa’s 100 largest companies in terms of market capitalisation are listed on the JSE, including the five largest companies in Africa. In addition to  being the most advanced stock exchange in the region, the JSE is also among the global top 20 of exchanges in  market capitalisation and turnover. With a market capitalisation of 159% of GDP in 2012, South Africa also has one of the largest equity markets in the world, relative to the size of its economy.Touching on the recent transition in political leadership which led to Cyril Ramaphosa being elected as President of the Republic – Newton-King says that this change has brought about a sense of renewed hope – not only for South Africans, but also for foreign investors.“When foreign investors have come to talk to us recently – they started out with the question ‘is the political change for real’ and what we are able to confidently tell them is that this change has imbued our people with a real sense of home and optimism. They ask us about the Rule of Law, and whether or not we all respect their rights and of course we proudly say that we have one of the world’s most respected Constitutions and one of the most respected judiciary – and these are enormously positive things to say about our country.“This country is the most extraordinary place to live in, there is a beat that you wake up to every single day. I am inspired by the diversity that we have as a competitive advantage in this country,” concluded Newton-King.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Mark Sulc and Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Ohio State University ExtensionThe best time to take a last harvest of forages is this week and next in Ohio, for the least risk to the long-term health of the stand. This is especially true for alfalfa and other legumes that need the fall period to replenish carbohydrate and protein reserves in the taproots that are used for winter survival and regrowth next spring. This fall rest period is particularly important this year, because our surviving stands have suffered a great deal of wet soil stress this year. Adding the stress of fall cutting will be like adding insult to injury, in our opinion carrying a higher degree of risk this year than normal.Unfortunately, many fields this year may not be at a reasonable harvest stage during the next two weeks, because the rainy weather early this season blew apart our normal harvest schedules. Many producers are faced with the choice between harvesting lower yields at a less mature stage now or waiting to harvest when yields will be higher. Like most farming decisions, there are trade-offs and risk factors to consider when making a fall legume harvest. This article reviews best management practices under the conditions we face this year.The decision of when to take the last harvest of alfalfa to ensure good winter survival and yield potential for the following year can be boiled down to two choices: 1) cut early enough in the fall (generally early September) to permit alfalfa to regrow and replenish carbohydrate root reserves, or 2) cut late enough so that alfalfa does not regrow and use up root reserves for that limited regrowth prior to winter dormancy. Cutting in between those times means more risk to the stand; however, there are factors such as previous cutting management, age of stand, soil fertility, variety, and soil moisture that affect the level of that risk.For those who are risk adverse, following the last cutting date recommendations offers the highest probability of promoting stand winter survival and vigorous green up and growth the following spring. The recommendation in the 15th edition of the Ohio Agronomy Guide is to complete the last regular harvest of alfalfa by September 7 in northern Ohio, September 12 in central Ohio and by September 15 in southern Ohio. The corollary is to delay final harvest until a killing frost (25F for several hours) has occurred.Another approach to fall harvest management uses growing degree-days (GDD) rather than calendar dates. Work done by Belanger et al. and published in 1998 in the Canadian Journal of Plant Science, indicates that alfalfa needs 500 GDD (based on degrees Celsius and base 5 C for alfalfa growth) between a late season cut and a killing frost to generate sufficient regrowth to provide good winter survival and yield potential for the following year. With regard to taking a late fall harvest, Dan Undersander, University of Wisconsin Extension retired forage specialist, wrote in a 2012 article “…we do not need to wait for a killing frost to take the last cutting. We must only wait until it is so cool that little or no regrowth will occur. Thus, harvesting in late fall, when less than 200 GDD will accumulate, minimizes winter injury…” The period between an accumulation of more than 200 GDD and less than 500 GDD is a no-cut period (GDD calculated from degrees Celsius scale with base 5C). This GDD approach provides flexibility in date of last harvest, but it involves more risk because the grower must predict or consider probability of either accumulating enough GDD or GDD not accumulating. Historic weather data, like that available from the OARDC weather stations (http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/), is useful to calculate those probabilities.Based on this GDD approach, we studied 5 years (2013-2017) of weather data at Wooster, OH. The date of a killing frost (25 F for several hours) ranged from November 3 to 22. The no cut zone of 500 to 200 GDD prior to the killing frost was September 17 to October 13 for three of the five years, but was September 4 to 30 in 2014 and September 10 to October 4 in 2013. So, the period of most risk for cutting alfalfa based on this GDD criterion agrees well with past recommendations to not cut alfalfa from early September to mid-October. Therefore, cutting in late October prior to a true killing frost of forage legumes, is likely to not result in little to no regrowth and no significant depletion of root reserves. However, there is still the risk of frost heaving with the late removal of forage cover (discussed more below).Previous harvest management should be a part of the risk equation and assessment of the probability of a fall harvest affecting stand survival and health. The cutting frequency during the growing season affects the energy status of the plant going into the fall. Frequent cutting (30-day intervals or less) results in the plant never reaching full energy reserve status during the growing season. A short regrowth period just prior to the fall harvest can be especially risky if that fall harvest occurs between mid-September and early October, because the regrowth uses root reserves and there won’t be enough growing weather remaining for the plants to accumulate a high level of root reserves before cold weather shuts down the plants. This lower root reserve status may limit winter survival and spring regrowth, depending on the winter and early spring growing conditions.Variety selection may also affect the risk assessment of fall cutting. Today’s top varieties have genetics selected to better withstand intensive cutting schedules. Alfalfa varieties with high disease resistance and good levels of winter hardiness will be more tolerant of a fall cutting. Adequate fertility, especially soil potassium levels, and a soil pH near 6.8 will improve plant health and increase tolerance to fall cutting. Stands under 3 years of age are generally more tolerant of fall cuttings than older stands where root and crown diseases are setting in. However, you have more productive stand life to lose if younger stands are harmed by fall cutting.Consider soil drainage and soil moisture. High soil moisture content slows down the cold hardening/fall dormancy process, increasing the risk of winter injury. Alfalfa stands on well-drained soils tolerate later fall cuttings better than alfalfa on moderately or poorly drained soils. But a word of CAUTION – Removing the top growth of alfalfa plants going into the winter on heavy soils and poorly drained soils increases the risk of damage from spring frost heaving, which is a significant risk on many Ohio soils with higher clay content. This would be a concern when cutting very late after the 200 GDD threshold date.Finally, consider the economics of a fall harvest. Often the height of the alfalfa is deceptive as an indicator of tonnage. The resulting windrow after cutting is often small or sparse. Thus, the cost of mechanically harvesting is high on a per ton basis.Fall cutting risk can be reduced but not eliminated. Nature bats last as we saw this spring and alfalfa stand health and survival will suffer when early freezes, open and very cold winters, early springs with ice, and/or extreme rainfall and temperature variations occur. Unfortunately, forage supplies are short this year, and some producers may be forced into taking more risk than they would like to take with fall cutting. But if at all possible, we urge producers to observe the fall rest period for forage legumes this year.last_img read more

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now I am fortunate enough to get to speak to a lot of different sales organizations. In workshops, the people who work for these companies often tell me what they are doing now. They want to share with me the things that they believe they should be doing to produce the results that they need. But that isn’t what is most interesting. What is interesting is what they are not doing. Mostly, they know what these things are.If what you were doing was producing the results that you need, you wouldn’t need to change anything. But when you are not getting the results you need, then it is necessary to do something different. It may mean that you have to stop doing something. It might also means that you might have to start doing something that you presently are not.This means change, and change isn’t easy. It requires that you change your mindset, and maybe long-held beliefs. It also means you need to do something new, to take some new action—potentially one you have avoided because it makes you uncomfortable.What also strikes me most is that the majority of the people who need to do something different are aware of that fact. They also have very good ideas about what they need to change, and they’ve typically known what they needed to do for a very long time. Mostly, they have lacked the confidence and the mechanics to do what they really need to do, and they are looking for help with both.This is likely true for you. Right now, there is some area of your life where you need a different result. You know you need to change how you think about the outcome you need, and you know you are going to have to do something that you have heretofore avoided doing. You don’t have to wait to attend a workshop to discover the mechanics or develop the confidence. You can search the web for answers, and you’ll almost certainly find something that addresses your need. You can also find someone to help you with the mechanics, even if that is thing you need help with is as simple as rehearsing with you.If you need to change, there is no reason to wait. You are here to do purposeful, meaningful work, and speed to results matters.last_img read more

first_imgBuying houses will be dearer in Mumbai as the State government on Tuesday cleared a Bill, without discussion, to increase stamp duty on property transfers by 1%. The extra money will be transferred to transport infrastructure projects planned in the city. To ensure public projects like the coastal road, Metro, monorail and freeways have enough funds, a surcharge will be added to the stamp duty charged for the sale, gift and rental transactions of properties.The Bill was passed without discussion as it was presented amid sloganeering from Opposition and ruling party MLAs over the issue of Maratha reservation.Leader of Opposition Radhakrishna Vikhe-Patil said that the government acted in an authoritarian manner and similarly pushed eight other Bills too. “We were not given a chance to speak. This is not how Bills are cleared,” he said. Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) leader Ajit Pawar said,“It is important that every Bill is discussed in detail. Every aspect should be scrutinised and that is our work. But they didn’t want it to be discussed,” he said.However, Parliamentary Affairs minister Girish Bapat said the Oppositioncreated the ruckus and the government had stopped them for speaking on the Bill.last_img read more

first_imgA PWD junior engineer, who was allegedly forced by a newly elected BJD MLA in Odisha to do sit-ups in public, on Friday claimed the legislator had also asked an executive engineer to slap him, even as the police registered a case against the lawmaker. The alleged “rowdyism” of Saroj Kumar Meher, first-time MLA from Patnagarh in Bolangir district, also triggered a row with the Opposition BJP coming down heavily on the BJD government and demanding immediate arrest of the lawmaker and the Congress condemning the incident. Mr. Meher, who drew flak after a video purportedly showed him forcing a PWD junior engineer to do sit-ups in public went viral, on Thursday apologised for his action, claiming he did so to assuage public anger. Later on Thursday, the engineer’s wife lodged a complaint with the police against the MLA, accusing him of publicly humiliating her husband.last_img read more

first_imgFLUSHING – The New York Mets beat the division-leading Washington Nationals again, this time coming back from a 2-0 deficit to score a run each in the 4th, 7th, and 8th innings, all three driven in by the red-hot Lucas Duda.It was a fitting way to welcome their newly-acquired slugger (from the Tigers, just minutes before the end of the July 31 trade deadline) Yoenis Cespedes.  Though the power-hitting left fielder didn’t connect, he drew a walk in three at-bats.Manager Terry Collins inserted Cespedes in the #3 slot, ahead of Duda, who has eight home runs in his last seven games. Batting fifth is “cult hero” Wilmer Flores, whose publicly-shed tears upon hearing he’d been traded (ultimately, he wasn’t) won over the Citi Field crowd, and his heroics at the plate as of late (he drove in the winning run in extra innings in the series’ opener) have made him as popular a Met as any these days.Starter Jacob de Grom, after a shaky first inning in which he gave up two runs, found his groove and shut down the Nats for the next five innings, leaving after six giving up a total of six hits in the game. Hansel Robles got the win and Jeurys Familia recorded his 28th save.The Mets go for the sweep on August 2, with Noah Syndergard on the mound, who is coming off a 3-hit 8-inning performance against the Padres on July 28, when he was perfect through six innings. A win would give them a share of first place in the NL East with the Nats.  The two teams close out the season in early October with another three-game series, also at Citi Field.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more