first_img SUBJECT TO APPROVAL Ahead of Jamaica’s 55th Independence celebrations next year, Minister of Culture, Gender Affairs, Entertainment and Sport, Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, has revealed that statues of decorated Olympians Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will be commissioned as part of the National Stadium Statue Park’s development plans. According to Grange, a total of four statues will be commissioned. The others are for former men’s 100m record holder Asafa Powell and multiple Olympic medallist, Veronica Campbell-Brown. “The ministry will commission four statues over the next two years for the following athletes – Usain Bolt, Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce, Veronica Campbell-Brown and Asafa Powell,” said Grange. “The first two statues of Usain and Shelly-Ann will be completed in time for the Jamaica 55 Independence celebrations next year and the other two statues of Veronica Cambell-Brown and Asafa Powell for the following year,” she continued. Grange was speaking during a programme of celebration for Rio Olympians and Paralympians, at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston, yesterday, adding the statues will be of the athletes’ liking. “Of course, the images will be subject to the approval of each athlete and the sculptor who is commissioned to do the work is the same sculptor who did the work for the Herb McKenley statue,” she pointed out of Basil Watson. The development plan for Independence Stadium Complex, which will include the national sports museum, according to Grange, will be done on a phased basis over a period of two years. “There are other plans that are in the works, but at this time I will hold those announcements for the future,” informed Grange. “I will emphasise that what we are doing is not just about celebrating the achievements of our athletes by having a big party, but we also will ensure that we have legacy projects that will be a lasting tribute to their achievements,” Grange stressed. She was speaking in reference to the Heroes weekend celebrations (October 14-16) for Olympians and Paralympians from the Rio Games, recently .last_img read more

first_imgPRINCE GEORGE, B.C. — Some call it the most wonderful time of the year, but for more people than you’d think, the winter months and holiday season can bring about feelings of depression and anxiety.“The demands that many place on themselves to attend to and meet the expectations of others may contribute to anxiety and stress,” says Northern Health Clinical Educator Damen DeLeenheer.“On top of all of this, the shorter days and longer nights can lead to Seasonal Affective Disorder, making the holiday season even more difficult to enjoy.”- Advertisement -He says family traditions, festivities and financial problems can be big contributors to those adverse feelings.“If maintaining a tradition isn’t making anyone happy, consider letting it go and creating a new one,” he adds. “This is your holiday, and not the Griswold’s.”In regards to finances, he says the expenses of the holidays can bring on stress, especially when the billed are tallied in the New Year.Advertisement “Setting a budget and tracking how closely you are keeping it can help reduce stress associated with finances.”If you think you may have Seasonal Affective Disorder, or someone you know may have it, DeLeenheer suggests you ask yourself the following questions: ‘Over the past two weeks, have you experienced little interest in doing things? Have you been feeling down, depressed or hopeless?’ If the answer is yes for more than half of the days, he urges considering some support.Northern Health also suggests a healthy diet, staying active, and spending more time outdoors in the sunlight to help combat seasonal affective disorder during the dark, cold winter months.last_img read more