first_imgDonald TrumpA US federal judge on Saturday lifted Trump administration restrictions that barred some refugees from the country, the latest in a series of immigration-related legal setbacks for the president.The United States said in October that it would resume accepting refugees after a 120-day ban ordered by President Donald Trump expired, but some-including those from 11 “high-risk” countries, most of which are Muslim majority-were still barred from entering.In his ruling on Saturday, Judge James Robart ordered American authorities to resume processing and admitting so-called “follow-to-join” refugees, which would once again allow the spouse and unmarried children of a refugee already in the country to be admitted.And he also ordered that “follow-to-join” refugees and “other refugees with a bona fide relationship to a person or entity within the United States” from the 11 “high-risk” countries be processed and admitted as well.The ruling is in response to motions for preliminary injunctions filed in two separate cases.“Plaintiffs in both cases are refugees, who find themselves in dire circumstances, their family members who yearn to be reunited with them, and humanitarian organizations whose fundamental mission is to help these vulnerable refugees resettle in the United States,” Robart wrote in his ruling.“Plaintiffs in both cases present compelling circumstances of irreparable harm inflicted by the federal agencies’ action at issue here.”Trump’s attempts at banning travelers from several mainly Muslim nations have been met with successive legal challenges this year.Critics say the president’s measures target Muslims, while the Trump administration has sought to cast the restrictions as being aimed at shoring up security.last_img read more

first_imgCanadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses a press conference at the conclusion of the G7 summit in La Malbaie, Quebec, on 9 June. Photo: AFPPledges worth nearly $3 billion dollars to help vulnerable women and girls, including refugees, get an education was announced at a G7 summit on Saturday.Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau, who hosted his fellow leaders at a Quebec resort, called it “the single largest investment in education for women and girls in crisis and conflict situations.”Canada will provide $300 million of the total.The amount was more than feminists groups that met with Trudeau on the sidelines of the summit had asked for, earning the G7 praise from civil society groups and activists, including Nobel prize-winner Malala Yousafzai who said it would “give more girls hope that they can build a brighter future for themselves.”The funds gives “young women in developing countries the opportunity to pursue careers instead of early marriage and child labour,” Malala, who was shot in the head while campaigning for girls’ education in Pakistan, wrote on Twitter.Canadian Council for International Co-operation’s Julia Sanchez called it “a most welcome set of results, especially in the face of the tense political context that has dominated the summit.”The cash-to be spent over three to five years-will be used to train teachers and improve curriculums, track educational data, support innovative education methods, and boost women and girls’ graduation rates in developing countries.The G7’s closing statement also included a general pledge against ocean pollution by cutting down on plastic, although neither the United States or Japan put their names to a detailed timeline.German Chancellor Angela Merkel and France’s president Emmanuel Macron said at press briefings that the goal was to have 100 percent recycling of plastics by 2030, and to develop more viable alternatives to plastic packaging.Merkel said that Washington did not want to commit to quantified targets. Japan did not immediately explain its position.The commitment of the G7’s four European countries-Italy, France, Britain and Germany-is in line with that of the European Union, which is looking to ban single-use plastic products and recycle 90 per cent of plastic bottles by 2025.last_img read more

first_imgfile photo of Cambodia mapThirty-two pregnant Cambodians were detained on Friday for their suspected involvement in an illegal surrogacy operation, carrying babies for Chinese clients, a court official said on Friday.Five other people, including a Chinese person, were arrested and charged with human trafficking following raids at two apartments in the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh.The pregnant women were discovered during the raids last month and 32 were charged with cross border human trafficking on Thursday, said Y Rin, a spokesman for Phnom Penh Municipal Court. They were placed in pretrial detention.Cambodia had been a popular international destination for infertile couples looking to have babies through commercial surrogacy, a practice made illegal in 2016.Police have said that each of the 32 women was promised $10,000 for carrying baby for Chinese clients.Once a woman becomes pregnant she receives $500, police said. When the baby is delivered, she is paid $300 a month until the full $10,000 is paid off.last_img read more

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uJustice Department attorneys will not recommend civil rights charges be brought against former Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, although the ultimate decision still lies with Attorney General Eric Holder. We’ll analyze the Justice Department’s position with legal expert Cheryl Wood as well as the issue of race and law enforcement with University of South Carolina law professor Seth Stoughton. Plus, we’ll take a look at new Maryland Governor Larry Hogan’s budget released earlier today. It’s all coming up this evening on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img read more