first_imgA view of Cal's football field during a sunset.BERKELEY, CA – NOVEMBER 13: A general view taken from the hill overlooking the California Memorial Stadium during the Oregon Ducks game against the California Golden Bears at on November 13, 2010 in Berkeley, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)California’s football program shared some tough news on Twitter this evening. An incoming freshman football player has suffered a serious spinal cord injury.The Bears shared a statement on Twitter provided by the family of freshman linebacker Chris Fatilua, a three-star prospect out of San Diego, Calif.“Chris has sustained a significant and serious spinal cord injury from an accident that occurred Monday afternoon in San Diego,” the statement reads.“He is receiving treatment for his injury and his long-term prognosis is unknown at this time. Our family is tremendously appreciate of the support we have received from everyone at this difficult time.“It is reassuring and inspirational to know that we will have that support as we begin the recovery process and tackle the challenges ahead. At this time we ask that our privacy be respected to help allow our family and those closest to us to focus on Chris’ recovery.”The following statement is being provided on behalf of the family of 2018 incoming freshman Chris Fatilua. pic.twitter.com/qAtVDqpwn6— Cal Football (@CalFootball) June 14, 2018Fatilua is a 6-foot-3, 220-pound linebacker out of San Diego. He was ranked the No. 58 inside linebacker in the class by 247Sports’ Composite Rankings.Our thoughts are with him and his family as he recovers.Stay tuned for more updates.last_img read more

At a ceremony in Bangui attended by representatives of the CAR Government, judicial authorities, the diplomatic corps and others, ICC Registrar Bruno Cathala inaugurated the office.Mr. Cathala said “the legitimacy of the International Criminal Court was especially dependant on its acceptance and the understanding of its role by the people of the Central African Republic and, in particular, by the victims of crimes under investigation by the Prosecutor.”Mr. Cathala also met with CAR President Francois Bozizé and Prime Minister Elie Dote to brief them on the Court’s mandate and functioning.Earlier this year the CAR Government referred the war crimes issue to the ICC, saying the national justice system was not capable of carrying out the complex investigations and proceedings necessary to prosecute the alleged crimes. In May ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo announced his office would investigate, as it believed that “grave crimes falling within the jurisdiction of the Court were committed,” particularly rape, during 2002-2003.When the violence peaked in those two years during an armed conflict between the Government and rebel forces, civilians were killed and raped and homes and stores were looted, the ICC said, citing a preliminary analysis. The conflict was characterized by widespread use of rape, and the investigation marks the first time the Prosecutor is examining a situation where allegations of sexual crimes far outnumber alleged killings. He said he would also monitor the current situation to determine whether more recent events warrant further investigation.Bangui is the fifth field office established by the ICC in the countries where its prosecutors are investigating possible war crimes, and joins offices already open in the Ugandan capital, Kampala; Kinshasa and Bunia in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC); and Abéché in eastern Chad.The office serves as the ICC’s public face in the field, providing administrative and logistical support for its activities. It is designed to help investigation teams, defence lawyers and experts in victim participation and reparation, outreach and witness protection work more effectively. 18 October 2007The International Criminal Court (ICC) today opened a new field office in the capital of the Central African Republic (CAR), less than five months after its prosecutors agreed to open an investigation into whether war crimes have been committed there. read more