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01Mar/21

Saving women during childbirth

first_imgThroughout history, more women have died in childbirth than men have died in battle, Mahmoud Fathalla, founder of the Safe Motherhood Initiative, told attendees at the recent Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania, co-sponsored by Harvard School of Public Health’s Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) and Management and Development for Health (MDH), a Tanzanian nonprofit.Fathalla and other speakers urged the more than 750 audience members, who represented 59 countries and work in more than 110 countries, to continue working for the health of the 200 million women who become pregnant each year.Conference attendees collaborated on a maternal health manifesto that was published in The Lancet on Feb. 22. Ana Langer, director of the MHTF and professor of the practice of public health at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Lancet Editor Richard Horton, and Guerino Chalamilla, executive director of MDH, co-authored the piece, which incorporated ideas raised during the conference and feedback from the participants. The authors hoped to keep maternal and women’s health part of discussions during the High-level Dialogue on Health in the Post-2015 Development Agenda, held March 5-6 in Gaborone, Botswana. Representatives from the World Health Organization and United Nations met with government officials and experts from around the world to develop suggestions for the development framework that will follow the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).Launched by the United Nations in 2000, the MDGs include two women’s health goals to be achieved by 2015: A 75 percent reduction in maternal mortality (from 1990 levels) and universal access to reproductive and sexual health services. Maternal mortality has been reduced by nearly 50 percent since 1990, but only 24 percent of developing countries are currently on track to achieve this goal by 2015. There is still much more work to be done, according to the manifesto authors. With less than a thousand days before the MDGs run their course, they sought to define a framework for maternal and women’s health goals in the next set of targets.The manifesto, which calls for “a new and challenging goal for maternal mortality reduction” that embraces “political, economic, and social rights for women,” reflects the collaborative spirit of the conference in a concrete way, Langer said. The writers state that as maternal mortality declines, policymakers need to focus on improving the quality of maternal health care while simultaneously ensuring that the care is delivered in a way that respects women’s dignity.“The manifesto will help make sure that women’s health stays high on the list of priorities that the world needs to keep working on,” Langer said. “It will hopefully also draw more attention to the agenda of the Women and Health Dean’s Flagship Initiative here at HSPH. This is an area where we are well-positioned to move the agenda forward.”To read the full story, visit the HSPH website.last_img read more

18Jan/21

Odds & Ends: John Mulaney and Nick Kroll Are Cockroaches & More

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.Don’t Raid the Oh, Hello StarsMove over, Lea Michele the Goat. John Mulaney and Nick Kroll, who wrapped up their Broadway debuts in Oh, Hello last month, are the latest to receive the honor of having two Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to be named in their honor at the Bronx Zoo. We can’t think of a better way to celebrate the success of your recent Broadway run than having two cockroaches named after you. Congratulations? Sam Rockwell Joins Lily Rabe FilmBroadway alum Sam Rockwell will star in the dramedy We’re Just Married, joining the previously announced Lily Rabe and Chris Messina, Variety reports. The Rodrigo Garcio-helmed project was first announced in 2012. Rabe’s father, Tony winner David Rabe, has penned the script. The movie is set in the 1970s and follows a tempestuous love triangle between a couple in a dwindling marriage and their neighbor. No word yet on a production timeline or release.Tony Awards Win Directors Guild AwardWhile the 2017 Tony Awards are just four months away (not that we’re counting), last year’s ceremony just received a special honor. Glenn Weiss and his directing team have won a Directors Guild Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Variety/Talk/News/Sports-Specials. This marks his seventh win for the Tonys, having won previously in 2007, 2010, 2011 2012, 2013 and 2015. Catch Weiss’ work once more at the 71st annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 11. Woke up to this letter. Thanks Wildlife Conservation Society and Bronx Zoo! No matter what happens @nickkroll and I will survive as Roaches. pic.twitter.com/nx4d7oSGi1— John Mulaney (@mulaney) February 6, 2017 View Comments John Mulaney & Nick Kroll(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser)last_img read more

19Oct/20

German lockdown ‘snitches’ spark hot debate

first_imgPoisoning social relations  “Not all of the calls lead to police intervention,” said Heidi Vogt, a spokeswoman for the police in Berlin.At the end of March, overwhelmed by complaints, police in the German capital appealed to residents on Twitter to stop calling the 110 emergency number, stressing that it was “not designed for lockdown breaches”.Andreas Geisel, interior minister for the city-state of Berlin, called on citizens to restrain themselves.”We don’t want any snitching,” he told RBB radio. “With a soft lockdown like we have in Germany at the moment, people’s continued freedom depends on their ability to contain themselves,” political historian Klaus-Peter Sick told AFP.”If a group of young people are behaving in an undisciplined way, some people will see that as irresponsible and not thinking about others,” which can lead to frustration and denunciation, he said.But some informers are motivated less by social responsibility and more by the desire to settle personal scores.”This is always the case in times of crisis, especially when they give rise to new regulations that make it possible to invoke justice: anyone who is jealous of their neighbor now has the opportunity to denounce them for the slightest violation of the coronavirus rules,” said Behr.”That poisons social relations.” Telling on your neighbors is a highly sensitive subject in a country still haunted by memories of Nazism and the former communist dictatorship in East Germany, two regimes under which informing on others was practically a national policy.The term “Duninziant” (“snitch”) has been trending on Twitter, fuelling ever more reference to the Third Reich and the Stasi secret police.”All of this appears to confirm a deep-seated prejudice that Germans have against themselves: That when in doubt, a part of the population is willing to become an extension of state power,” psychology professor Christian Stoecker told Der Spiegel weekly.But Germany is not the only country to have seen a rise in the number of people reporting fellow citizens to the authorities for breaching virus-related social distancing rules. Similar observations have been made in countries around the world where lockdowns have been imposed: In New Zealand, a dedicated website was deluged with reports; in South Africa, a wedding was interrupted after an anonymous call; and in France, the emergency number 17 has been overrun with calls. On a sunny Sunday in April, 20 people were enjoying a barbecue in the city of Schwerin in northern Germany.The police promptly intervened, slapping them with a fine for breaking new social distancing rules to limit the spread of COVID-19.They were alerted to the festivities by a neighbor, “outraged by such behavior”, who also proceeded to boast about her efforts on social media, opening up a heated debate about the return of denunciation to Germany and whether it is acceptable in the current crisis.center_img Universal phenomenon “The phenomenon is universal, but with different regional characteristics. It happens more often in urban areas, where many people depend on each other, than in less populated areas where you have more space,” said Rafael Behr, a professor of criminology and sociology at the Hamburg Police Academy.”Acts of denunciation will increase, as will acts of solidarity,” he predicts.”The longer the state of emergency goes on, the more antisocial people will become and the more mistrust and suspicion will develop, for example about whether your neighbor is contagious.”In Germany, police are receiving several hundred complaints a day via phone calls, emails and social media, according to an AFP tally.In Munich alone, “around 100 to 200 citizens are calling every day” with violations to report, according to Sven Mueller, a spokesman for the city’s police force.In the state of Brandenburg, which surrounds Berlin, police intervened in 2,930 violations of social distancing rules between March 20 and April 7.”Around two thirds of these cases were linked to reports from citizens,” said police spokeswoman Stefanie Klaus.The majority of complaints are about people entering public spaces such as stadiums, parties in private homes or cars with license plates from outside the area. Topics :last_img read more

16Oct/20

First Lady Frances Wolf, Secretary Teresa Miller Join Local Food Service Providers to Unveil New Report on Hunger in York County

first_img First Lady Frances Wolf,  Press Release York, PA – First Lady Frances Wolf and Department of Human Services (DHS) Secretary Teresa Miller today joined the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank and Auditor General Eugene DePasquale to highlight the food bank’s new report on hunger in York County, the importance of charitable food organizations, and the effects of food insecurity on health.“It is a sad reality that too many Pennsylvanians face the threat of hunger every day,” First Lady Frances Wolf said. “There is no greater responsibility than ensuring the health and well-being of our citizens, yet this mission cannot be achieved by government alone. We must continue to take an active, collaborative approach to ensure all Pennsylvanians have adequate access to fresh, nutrient-dense foods. The Central Pennsylvania Food Bank and its partners work tirelessly to meet this need in the communities they serve, and I am grateful for their partnership and work to combat food insecurity across Pennsylvania.”More than 1.5 million Pennsylvanians face food insecurity every day. Chronic hunger and food insecurity can have profound impacts on a person’s health and well-being. Children who are food insecure are more likely to have poor academic outcomes and adults who do not have enough to eat have worse physical and behavioral health outcomes and higher medical spending.The Central Pennsylvania Food Bank’s report is an evaluation of food security and the charitable food network in York County. It found that more than 55,000 residents of York County are food insecure, and 35 percent of food needs are currently unmet. The report’s findings and recommendations outline opportunities to help close this gap and provide a foundation for continuing to address food security around the commonwealth.The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the nation’s most important anti-hunger program and helps more than 1.8 million Pennsylvanians avoid food insecurity. Children, people with disabilities, and elderly Pennsylvanians are some of the program’s biggest beneficiaries. SNAP expands recipients’ purchasing power to buy food from their local grocery stores and farmers markets. Participation in SNAP allows Pennsylvanians to buy nutritious food that supports children’s learning abilities, improves health outcomes, lowers health care costs, and helps working families keep food on the table.Charitable food organizations make significant contributions to their communities by supporting individuals facing food insecurity and allowing them to access additional resources so people do not go hungry. Their work to supplement food assistance programs helps individuals who are food insecure make ends meet so they are less likely to choose between paying for food or going without basic needs like housing, medical care, clothing, utilities, and other essentials.In May 2019, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) published a study on the influence of SNAP redemptions on the economy and county-level employment in the time leading up to, during, and after the Great Recession. This study found that SNAP redemptions could have a greater economic stimulus impact than many other forms of government spending per dollar spent, especially during a recession, because they are paid directly to low-income individuals. For instance, the grocery subsidies deliver food directly to tables along with a financial return into rural supermarkets and small businesses in those communities.This positive economic impact is felt in positive economic climates. In 2017, $2.7 billion dollars in SNAP benefits were redeemed at Pennsylvania grocery stores and other authorized retailers. Those dollars support farmers and jobs across Pennsylvania.In September 2016, Setting the Table: Blueprint for a Hunger-Free PA was developed to address hunger in PA as a response to Governor Wolf’s executive order establishing the Governor’s Food Security Partnership. The partnership includes the departments of Aging, Agriculture, Community and Economic Development, Education, Health, and Human Services.Since the release of the blueprint in 2016, the Wolf Administration has completed key steps in eliminating food insecurity by:• Growing food security programs in the Medicaid system;• Increasing knowledge of summer feeding programs by mailing summer feeding postcards to all SNAP recipient households;• Reducing stigma associated with SNAP by rebranding SNAP for seniors’ materials;• Broadening current programs across various departments to encourage food security components;• Educating children, families and seniors on the necessary nutrition needed for a healthy life;• Shorting the Elderly/Disabled Simplified Application Project (ESAP) application for seniors from 24 pages to 2 pages, which has benefited more than 390,000 people; and• Being a national leader in SNAP application timeliness and reducing SNAP error rates.“To truly end hunger in Pennsylvania, it will take a commitment from the private, public, and non-profit sectors of government to ensure the availability of a holistic array of interventions and supports to lift low-income families out of poverty and toward better health outcomes,” Secretary Miller said. “The findings in this report show the community’s commitment to providing resources for individuals to lead an active, healthy life, but shows us that there are still opportunities to do more to help all Pennsylvanians have enough to eat and avoid chronic hunger.”Pennsylvanians who may qualify but do not currently receive the services can apply online through our COMPASS application at dhs.pa.gov, on a smartphone with the myCOMPASS PA app, or in-person at your local County Assistance Office.Find out more information regarding the Blueprint for a Hunger-Free Pennsylvania.For more information and resources to fight hunger throughout the commonwealth, visit www.dhs.pa.gov/ending-hunger. First Lady Frances Wolf, Secretary Teresa Miller Join Local Food Service Providers to Unveil New Report on Hunger in York County SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img June 21, 2019last_img read more

17Sep/20

Students fail to show for suicide prevention forum

first_imgDr. Kelly Greco, the assistant director of outreach and prevention services for USC student Health, sets up for a suicide prevention discussion. The event was cut short because no students showed up. (Julia Rosher | Daily Trojan)USC Student Health held two open discussions centered on suicide prevention on Monday. These were the only USC-hosted events for National  Suicide Prevention Week, a nationwide effort to raise awareness about suicide. However, the discussion was cut short after no students showed up — not a single seat was filled during both sessions. While the lack of attendees may have dampened the intended discussion, professionals still emphasized the need for open forums among students and faculty. “The reality [is] that student populations are experiencing seemingly more distress yearly,” said Dr. Robert Mendola, the division’s executive director and division chief for student mental health. “We have to identify what’s going on and how to prevent this trend.” The discussion was meant to inform students about a suicide prevention tactic titled “Take 5 to save lives,” which presenters said can take as little as five minutes to implement. The tactic includes educating students on signs of suicide, self-care, awareness and the importance of reaching out to professionals.The forum was also meant to address the increased risk of suicide among marginalized groups including the LGBTQ community. “What we do see is that the [suicide] rates are very high for the LGBTQ community,” said Dr. Kelly Greco, the assistant director of outreach and prevention services. Throughout this week, USC will be emphasizing the importance of spreading awareness among peers across social media platforms. There will also be a large focus on encouraging students to participate in an ongoing dialogue that extends far past this week. “This is a topic and dialogue that needs to be continuous throughout the year,” Greco said. The Engemann Student Health Center has started working with the Jed Foundation, a nonprofit organization that helps evaluate a campus’ needs for mental health services and creates comprehensive systems, programs and policies tailored toward mental health, substance abuse and suicide prevention efforts. By integrating the Jed program onto campus, the health center can pinpoint specific issues to target that are present in the well-being of USC students. “Our efforts are increasing because our resources are increasing,” Mendola said while referring to the addition of 10 new therapists to the counseling center’s resources. “By increasing our therapists by 10, we’re not just increasing direct service to students, we’re increasing our availability to engage in programs.” An example of a new program the center is offering comes in the form of “Feel Better” workshops, which cover topics on anxiety, resilience and other issues present on campus. The workshops encourage proactive student participation in a safe environment; however, they will only take place during the beginning of the semester. Another resource mentioned was Trojan Care for Trojans, an anonymous request form available to all students if they feel worried about a peer. “The undertone of all of this is how do we create a campus driven by a culture of student wellbeing?”  said Paula Swinford, the director of the Office for Wellness and Health Promotion.last_img read more