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26Jan/21

Asian American Association celebrates New Year

first_imgStudents can play games, enjoy food and try their luck for the new year at the Asian American Association’s (AAA) annual casino night in the Coleman Morse Lounge on Friday in celebration of the Lunar New Year, lasting from 9-11 p.m.Crystal Chen-Goodspeed, junior and treasurer of the AAA, said the event will give students the chance to compete for tickets and enter into the raffle for prizes, which include a Kindle and Beats by Dre headphones.“There is free reign to play any game [visitors] want … There will be Asian-themed goodies and red envelopes during the course of the event to really convey the many messages of Lunar New Year,” Chen said. “At the end of the night, everyone will submit their raffle tickets and drawing will commence to distribute prizes.”Khanh Mai, junior and vice president of AAA, said the games will incorporate a range of meanings and traditions.“Some of the games are seen as traditional to the respective culture, such as bau cua of Vietnam and mahjong of China. Others are more prototypical of casinos, like blackjack and poker,” Mai said.“It is like your normal casino night with an Asian flair,” Chen-Goodspeed said.According to Chen-Goodspeed, gambling and games are traditional celebrations of the Lunar New Year.“A big part of the holiday is large family gatherings and gambling. It is believed that if you have good luck in gambling during the celebration, then you will have good luck for the remainder of the year,” Chen-Goodspeed said.Mai said this event is important because it allows students to maintain their Lunar New Year traditions even while away from home.“It’s important for ND students to celebrate partly because it may be a glimpse of home-away-from-home for them,” Mai said. “I know that my first time away from home during Lunar New Year was especially rough; I would equate it with not being home for Christmas.”The AAA — who partnered with the Vietnamese Student Association, Korean Student Association, Taiwanese Student Association, Chinese Culture Society and Japan Club, as well as the multicultural commissioners from Siegfried, Pasquerilla West, McGlinn, Carroll and Breen-Phillips for the event — encourages all students to attend, even if they have never celebrated in the past.“It’s always insightful to learn about different cultures and their own special way of seeing and celebrating the world,” Mai said.Although celebrations of Lunar New Year vary around the world, the AAA hopes their casino night will encompass the core tradition of the holiday, Mai said.“Families tend to gather in the days preceding Lunar New Year to indulge in family time and begin festivities; [Casino Night] plans to do the same. It’s time for us to spend with one another, and amidst the fun, think back on the year past and look forward to the future,” Mai said.The entrance fee of $5 at the door gives each student 15 tickets. Additional tickets can be purchased if needed.Tags: AAA, Asian American Association, asian american association casino night, Casino Night, coleman morse lounge, crystal chen-goodspeed, khanh mai, lunar new yearlast_img read more

31Dec/20

Battle brews over short-term energy investment plans in Puerto Rico

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The number of jurisdictions pursuing a goal of 100 percent renewables keeps growing. Puerto Rico looks to be next, with a late November plan from the island’s governor and a proposal before the legislature both calling for 100 percent renewables by 2050. In October, a diverse group of clean energy advocates also published a proposal, “Queremos Sol,” that outlines a path to all-renewables by the same year.Agreement on the territory’s energy system seems to have coalesced around a renewable portfolio standard and timeline. “I can’t think of any entity that’s said it’s opposed to 100 percent renewables by 2050. That certainly is progress,” said Cathy Kunkel, an energy analyst at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), which contributed to the Queremos Sol report. “That’s a consensus that didn’t exist before the hurricane.”It’s taken months to get to this point. And while the long-term vision seems to have been clarified, stakeholders remain divided on short-term goals. “What the problem is, and what we need to be careful about, is how different organizations and groups propose to get there,” said Ruth Santiago, a lawyer at local environmental group Comité Diálogo Ambiental and a contributor to the Queremos Sol report.In its August fiscal plan, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) said it was looking to convert some plants to burn natural gas and that it would cost $500 million to build a liquefied natural gas import terminal. When the utility’s current CEO, José Ortiz, came aboard, he said natural gas would support a future with more renewables. PREPA did not respond to requests for comment about the proposed RPS, but in its fiscal plan the utility lays out a path to a generation mix in 2023 that’s 32 percent solar and wind and 41 percent gas.The group of engineers, environmentalists and clean energy advocates who wrote the Queremos Sol proposal are pushing for integration of renewables now. Santiago said investing in natural gas in the short term might be “disastrous” and will likely impede investment in solar.“Renewable energy and storage technologies are available now,” said Kunkel. “And if your goal is to get to 100 percent renewables by 2050, you should start investing in them now. The most important challenges are going to be what investment decisions get made in the next few years. Most of Puerto Rico’s power plants are old and [need] to be replaced in any event. What they get replaced with really matters in terms of what type of fuel infrastructure you’re locking yourself into for the next several decades,” she added.More: Inside Puerto Rico’s quest for 100% renewables: A clash over natural gas Battle brews over short-term energy investment plans in Puerto Ricolast_img read more