01Mar/21

And now: President CEO

first_imgDonald John Trump, the 45th U.S. president, will be the first to go straight from the boardroom to the Oval Office without any political experience or military service.During the 2016 campaign, Trump parlayed his fame as a celebrity real estate developer into a winning pitch to voters as a Washington outsider. Emphasizing his decades of experience as a wheeler-dealer building luxury hotels, casinos, and golf courses around the world, Trump pledged to use his business savvy and hard-charging leadership style to “drain the swamp” of the Washington bureaucracy and deliver results for the American people.The United States is not a company, of course, and its citizens are not employees, but voters still were drawn to his promises of a fresh approach to governing. So what skills and perspectives might the wealthy businessman draw on as he transitions from CEO to commander in chief?To get a better sense of the months ahead, The Gazette asked Harvard Business School (HBS) faculty members how Trump’s nearly 50 years of experience in building a global corporate empire might shape his approach to the presidency. Their insights follow.Real estate rarely a zero-sum gameJohn D. MacomberSenior lecturer of business administrationYou have to start by distinguishing between a branding operation that’s supported by other activities, like Disney Hotels, and pure real estate [companies], like Boston Properties and Vornado. Trump is primarily a branding operation.There are many sectors in real estate. Hospitality is one of them. In hotels, there are usually three parts to every deal. Usually, there’s one entity that owns the land and owns the building. There’s a different entity that likes to do operations like housekeeping and food and beverage. And there’s a third entity that has the brand. Companies like the Four Seasons or Ritz Carlton, we say they “flag” a hotel. They don’t manage it; they “flag” it. Trump has a few hotels, but mostly the properties are owned by other investors and he’s the “flag,” the name.Given that case, that would inform a world view that has a high sensitivity to perceptions in what we call in real estate “the real economy.” Are the rooms full, and in which locations? Hotel people have a high sensitivity to what they perceive as “the financial economy.” They don’t know the inner workings, but “what are the interest rates?” They have high sensitivity to transactions and to partners, because everything’s a bespoke, one-off transaction. Typically, people like this also see the shared value. They seldom get into a zero-sum negotiation. They think, “How can we help each other?”You’d expect someone like this to be very transactional, with a very high sensitivity to perception of current events, with a very high sensitivity to perceived financial prices, if not the inner workings of the financial market, and extremely high sensitivity to brand: What are people thinking? And you’d expect a much lower sensitivity to administration, to structure, to organizational dynamics, to long-term view, and to capital spending.The incoming president has a really good sense for what people want to buy in that demographic. But going forward, one would expect that the temptation would be to continue to play your strong suit and try and express your own taste and your ideas because it’s worked for you for 50 years.The second issue you’d expect of anybody in this situation would be that they’re probably quite confident in their own judgment. Having a very long record of reinforcement in making good decisions, for anybody, that would make them think they’ll be expert in other areas, whether it’s aviation or welfare or defense.I think an early indicator will be: Can he persuade a different group of people? He’s so good at persuading the people he knows, but can he persuade Congress to act? If he’s a good communicator and good negotiator and good creator of shared value, he’ll figure out something that works for House Speaker Paul Ryan and for Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. A second thing to look for is how much leeway does he really give to someone like Secretary of State nominee Rex Tillerson or to Wilbur Ross, the Commerce Department nominee, or to Vice President Mike Pence? It looks like he’s a person who hasn’t delegated a lot in the past. So those would be early things to see. And then there’s what he’d do in a crisis. From what’s been reported by the press, the crises in the past, he’s been able to bluster through. There may be different crises here, where it’s not a question of, say, talking firmly to your bankers.For the most part, it looks like he’s always had the choice to walk away. In most of these project negotiations, he’s had a chance to do that. In the presidency, there will probably be negotiations — with Congress, with other nations, or with agencies or with all the people a president deals with — where you have to make a deal, and walking away is not a choice. It’ll be interesting to see how well he can create shared value in that context.A lot of negotiations are also about leverage, and for the most part, he’s gotten himself in a very favorable position where he usually has the negotiating leverage. He may not have the leverage going forward. It’ll be interesting to see how he handles that. And can he use those negotiating skills and those communication skills and create shared value skills in a situation where there’s no walk-away option and he doesn’t have the leverage. “Command and control” management modelNancy F. KoehnJames E. Robison Professor of Business AdministrationI study business leaders, government leaders, religious leaders, social activists, and other individuals — past and present — who exercise real, worthy impact. As a historian, I don’t see huge differences among political and business leaders in terms of what makes them effective. Courageous, serious leaders are men and women who are animated by a big, honorable mission, who get things done to achieve that mission, who demonstrate consistent emotional awareness as they do this, who motivate others to try to be better and bolder in pursuit of this purpose, and who work (tirelessly) to become better leaders themselves while they are doing all these other things.Thus far, we have not seen much evidence — either along the campaign trail or since the election — that Mr. Trump meets most of these criteria. But I think many voters perceived him as being successful in getting things done. Some of this perception was likely a result of his public confidence. Some may have resulted from his bluntness and his stated intent to cut through the red tape of Washington, along with its perceived stagnation, dominance by big money, and the sense that so many Americans have that the federal government is run by a small number of people calling all the shots.I think his hard-charging tone, coupled with his willingness to single out certain groups — from the media to Muslims to women to Hispanics — as responsible for many of the nation’s problems unleashed reservoirs of frustration, anger, and fear among certain groups of Americans. History makes it clear that all leaders have to be able to understand and respond to emotional currents among the people they influence. And I think Trump did that on the campaign trail in ways that served his political purposes very well. It is much less clear that inciting such animosity — and indeed hatred — among certain groups of Americans toward their fellow citizens will serve our country well. Certainly, history offers no such assurances. In fact, leaders who have risen to power by relying heavily on collective anger and discrimination toward other groups have proven to be despots, tyrants, and men who destroy the values and institutions that lie at the heart of democracies.Homing in on Trump’s reputation as a hard-charging man of action, we can perhaps think about his management style as one of “command and control.” This is a description in which the company, organization, or enterprise runs as a kind of military operation in which everyone lines up and falls in line. Although in the early 20th century many businesses were structured along such lines, “command and control” organizations have become much less common — outside of the military — in the last 40 or 50 years. Today, businesses and other enterprises are flatter, much less hierarchical, and much more diverse than the companies that first grew to great scale and came to define the modern industrial economy. This evolution is partly a result of globalization and the fact that many large organizations have become much more interdependent and complex; one-size-fits-all no longer works so well. This development is also a function of social, economic, and political change. Leaders now have to deal with a much broader set of stakeholders, including citizens, consumers, and labor around the world in a way that they simply didn’t half a century ago.At the same time, business has become responsible for much more than simply “selling high and buying low” and “delivering a healthy return for shareholders.” Today, companies are being held accountable for a whole host of social and political issues, from labor practices to environmental policies. In this context, hard charging and “command and control” are perhaps overly blunt instruments. I write and teach about individual leaders concerned with an honorable purpose, men and women who succeed against great odds. The people I study — from the explorer Ernest Shackleton to Abraham Lincoln to the environmentalist Rachel Carson — all have a great deal of deftness, meaning they understand the precept: “In this particular situation, what do I need to do to move my mission forward?” They also have great reserves of emotional awareness, which they apply to themselves and the people they are trying to influence. From this perspective, it seems to me that if you’re always on a hard-charging default drive, then it’s very difficult to pause and summon up the suppleness, care, and emotional acuity that leaders need in high-stakes situations.I think the incoming president has been very successful in terms of how he’s managed the American media to his ends. I can count on two hands the number of leaders I have seen in my lifetime who could walk into a room, take the measure of a large crowd so quickly, and then move into that energy and bring them along to embrace his agenda at a given moment. He has done this over and over, not only among his political supporters, but also among reporters and other members of the press.Despite these skills, which require some foresight, he appears to be extraordinarily reactive in his emotions, in his declarations, in the very heavy hammer that he wields across the board on different subjects as they come up, in real time, using social media. This is unprecedented. There is nothing in American history that compares with this aspect of his behavior: a public candidate and now president-elect, who is not only willing but eager to raise the public temperature so significantly, so often, and on such a widespread basis.When I reflect on strong leaders, I usually see an important connection between a given individual’s decisions and his or her respect for the organization for which that person is responsible. Government leaders make choices affected by laws and the founding documents of a nation; judges issue decisions anchored in precedent; CEOs consider the values and mission of their companies; even disruptive entrepreneurs struggle to build an organization that will execute a larger end and then endure. This connection is critical because a worthy leader wants the people whom he or she motivates to respect the organization and to serve that enterprise from such a place. This means a leader is always working to deepen the sense of integrity that his or her followers accord the organization, including its values, its charter, and those charged with serving as stewards of these critical aspects. We have yet to see Mr. Trump evidence such respect or incite it among his fellow Americans.Anyone we would say was an effective leader had the respect of his or her organization and toggled always back and forth between “what does this mean for the trajectory and the integrity and the character and the identity and the stability of my organization?” and “how is that related to my actions?” And that critical umbilical cord is, from my vantage point, not in sight here. I don’t see it. And I’m most troubled by that.“Push” and “pull’ marketing to build public support John A. QuelchCharles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration and professor in health policy and management at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthMarketing is important in campaigning. It is equally important in governing. In 2008, Barack Obama won the presidency with an uplifting call for hope and change. He leveraged online media to attract volunteers and donors, building a swell of grassroots support. In 2016, Donald Trump also leveraged new media, notably Twitter, to generate grassroots support around his call to make America great again. Effective communications and wise targeting of resources against key voter segments, notably in swing states, were equally important in both cases.Marketing in the world of politics is different from marketing in the world of commerce. In politics, you need majority support or at least a plurality to be successful. In commerce, you can be highly profitable as a niche brand appealing to a narrow segment of the population. In fact, being all things to all people is a recipe for disaster. The other noteworthy distinction is that the presidential marketer needs to win the vote on one day every four years, whereas the commercial marketer needs the cash register to ring every day.Nevertheless, public opinion is important to any president, and President Trump enters office with a low popular approval rating. That will require him to hone his communications skills and to win over many people who remain skeptical of his motives and competency. He must consciously set out to escape the Washington bubble and stay in touch with the ordinary voters from whom he draws much of his energy and confidence. Their continued enthusiasm to lobby their senators and representatives will be important to his ability to legislate his campaign promises.Governing as president therefore requires a combination of “push” and “pull” marketing. Coca–Cola pushes its products through retail distribution and at the same time advertises directly to consumers to generate demand that pulls the product off retail shelves. In the same way, President Trump must push his agenda through Congress, but strong popular support backing the agenda will help persuade legislators to vote accordingly.A likely force benefiting small business Karen MillsFormer administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and now a senior fellow at HBS and at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School Having a businessman in the White House has the potential to change the conversation in America around small business. Indeed, President Trump’s business background, if applied in the right way, could help him understand the needs of American small business. There are certainly thousands of small businesses that hope this will be the case.However, to do this right, President Trump needs to step up the focus on small business and ensure this critical part of our economy is part of every economic discussion his team has. So far, his attention seems to be on big business — aside from his nomination of Linda McMahon as SBA administrator. Big business often has significantly different needs from small business. Small businesses have a more difficult time accessing capital, providing health care to their employees, navigating complex regulations at every level of government, and much more. His promises to cut taxes and reduce burdensome regulation for small businesses could be a good start. But on both of these fronts, the policy details will matter when it comes to what small businesses need to grow and succeed.On the regulatory front, as I have written in a recent working paper, small business lending falls through the cracks of our current oversight framework. Small businesses and lenders should push President Trump to streamline the current “spaghetti soup” of regulation that is supposed to ensure greater access to capital, transparency, and borrower protections. Small businesses could also benefit from more incentives for large companies, which stand to get significant tax breaks under a Trump administration, to give more of their supply chain contracts to U.S.-based small businesses. In addition, National Federation of Independent Business surveys show that access to affordable health care is a top small business priority. Obamacare began to address this issue through the SHOP [Small Business Health Options Program] exchanges, but “Trumpcare” could go further in ensuring affordable rates for small businesses.Small businesses should advocate for President Trump to treat them like the customer, something that can be done by leveraging technology and innovation in ways that streamline interactions with federal agencies, like online form filing.Stars align to fix a broken tax systemMihir DesaiMizuho Financial Group Professor of Finance and professor of law at Harvard Law SchoolThe stars are in alignment for a major tax reform under President Trump. Thirty years of inaction on tax reform, along with significant changes in the economy and other countries’ tax policies, has made the U.S. tax system unwieldy and problematic in many ways. Most obviously, the corporate tax has become a dominant factor in the market for corporate control (i.e., so-called inversions), financing patterns (i.e., cash holdings), and profit-shifting activities (i.e., transfer pricing of profits).In short, it’s broken and we have the worst of all worlds relative to the rest of the world. We have high marginal rates that distort incentives, especially on profit-shifting, and only middle-of-the-pack average tax rates. The ratio of tax-induced distortions to revenue is creeping higher every year.The individual tax side of things is not quite as broken, but is overgrown and not serving our needs. We have numerous overlapping and confusing incentives on education, health, and child care expenses that ultimately limit the uptake of these programs. We have enacted several stealth tax increases that are quite large by phasing out deductions and exemptions. And, broadly speaking, the tax system may not reflect the apparent current support for more redistribution. One reason for that is the top bracket used to contain 0.1 percent of the taxpayers and now has 1 percent of the population. This creates resistance to increased top marginal rates.Finally, the usual guiding lights of equity and efficiency in tax policy now have to be complemented with a third concern: complexity. In the globalized world, there are ever-more margins on which economic agents can respond to complexities through planning. The overly complex system, especially on the international corporate side, is becoming a planner’s paradise.What will President Trump do? His plan during the campaign was admirable in some ways. The simplicity of the rate structure for individuals, the expansion of the standard deduction, the limitation on deductions, and the reduced corporate rate were broadly sensible. But, there were critical mistakes, including repeal of international deferral and a minimum tax for corporate foreign source income. It was fiscally irresponsible and not attuned to current tastes for redistribution.Given the relative inexperience of most of the current Trump economic team on these issues, I would expect that House Speaker Paul Ryan will dictate the broad outlines of any proposed legislation. His proposal, also known as the Ryan-Brady plan, is not just a renovation or a gut-rehab, it’s a teardown. It shifts the base of taxation to consumption from income through a “destination-based cash flow tax.” In effect, it is a form of value-added tax (VAT). Corporations will face a considerably lower rate, will not be allowed to deduct interest payments, and will be allowed to expense investments. The easiest way to understand that is: Because all business-to-business transactions are effectively deductible, the tax base becomes business-to-consumers transactions. In other words, consumption.One of the most important wrinkles in this system is that export revenue would be exempt from taxation, and the costs of imports would not be deductible under what is known as “border tax adjustments.” This has the potential for being incredibly redistributive across sectors, as exporters would have tax losses as far as the eye can see and importers would have much larger taxes due, unless exchange rates adjust to neutralize these changes in taxation, as economic theory would suggest.Will they? It’s hard to say because nothing on this scale has ever been attempted. Moreover, the plan has numerous question marks over how it would work. How would financial institutions get taxed? Would pass-through entities have their current treatment? Most importantly, it’s not clear it would pass muster with the World Trade Organization.The key advantage to Trump of the Ryan-Brady plan may well be the ability to characterize the border tax adjustments as tariffs. The box he put himself in regarding protectionist measures can be escaped by implementing the plan and labeling those adjustments as tariffs even though they’re not really functioning in that way. From an economic perspective, that deceit is preferable to the realities of tariffs. In recent tweets on auto companies, he’s already changed his language to a “border tax,” from tariffs.I think the risks of such a dramatic tax change are too great to justify the teardown. I’d prefer to see corporate tax reform proceed in a revenue-neutral way, with reduced rates and a shift to territoriality funded by changing the treatment of pass-throughs and by aligning the characterization of profits to tax authorities and capital markets. On the individual side, I think a significant expansion of the earned-income tax credit, unification and simplification of various credits and deductions, and a new top bracket for individuals making more than $1 million would help enormously.How does Trump’s business background condition his policy preferences and methods? It’s critical to realize that real estate development is quite unique in business, and the traits that allow you to succeed, to the degree he’s succeeded, in that field are not necessarily representative of the traits required elsewhere in business.Real estate development requires much more sharp-elbowed negotiating, coalition building between organizations, and marketing savvy than most types of business. It also tends toward monumental efforts rather than incremental change. Those skills might help him quite a bit in the Washington of today. Unfortunately, they could also result in a tweet-driven assemblage of hollow gestures (saving jobs via jawboning) without any real substance.These interviews have been edited for length and clarity. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

31Dec/20

Key details of German coal phase-out plan still to be finalized as deadline looms

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Clean Energy Wire:Germany’s detailed coal exit path and the end-date to coal-fired power generation remain unknown only days before a highly anticipated phase-out proposal is due to be published. A leaked draft of the final report of the country’s coal commission seen by the Clean Energy Wire suggests agreements on compensation for coal plant operators, support for affected mining regions, and measures to shield consumers from rising power prices. The draft also refers to Germany’s 2030 emission reduction targets for the energy sector as a guideline for the exit in accordance with its mandate. But the most pressing details from a climate perspective still need to be thrashed out during a marathon session scheduled for Friday 25 January: How many coal-fired power plants will go offline in the near future, and when will the last one be switched off?The draft document runs to 133 pages, and contains only five pages where details still need to be settled – but these concern a plan for coal power plant closures. Passages detailing the exit path are still littered with empty brackets “[XX]” that need to be filled with dates and coal power plant capacities following the final round of negotiations. The draft also doesn’t specify whether the embattled Hambach Forest, which has become a symbol for anti-coal activism in Germany and beyond, will be preserved.Germany’s coal exit commission was set up to find economic prospects for coal workers and regions before spelling out measures to reduce carbon emissions in line with Germany’s climate targets, and naming an end date for coal-fired power production, the most prominent blemish on the former climate action pioneer’s emissions record. This order is reflected in its official title: “Commission on Growth, Structural Change and Employment.”Officially, the commission’s last meeting will take place on 1 February. But the task force hopes to wrap up negotiations on Friday 25 January, so a safety buffer remains in case a compromise can’t be reached by that date, sources close to the commission told the Clean Energy Wire.The coal commission’s proposal is not legally binding, but since the task force is backed by a large majority in parliament, the government is widely expected to follow its recommendations.From a climate policy perspective, the key issue is how many power stations Germany will switch off in the short term, because this will have the largest impact on the country’s total emissions over time compared to other measures. Seven of Europe’s ten most CO2-intensive power plants are located in Germany. Shutting these down early would save a lot of cumulated emissions over the years.More: German coal exit timetable to be settled in last minute talks Key details of German coal phase-out plan still to be finalized as deadline loomslast_img read more

30Dec/20

Barkley Marathon 2018: The Race Wins Again

first_imgMany of our readers already know the Barkley Marathon. It has a reputation for being one of the hardest and most ridiculous ultramarathons in the world. Five, twenty-mile loops, over sixty thousand feet of elevation, through the hilly backwoods of Eastern Tennessee. Oh, and you have 60 hours to cross the finish line. Since the race debuted in 1980, only 15 have finished.The 2018 Barkley Marathon started this past Saturday, March 24 at 9:30 a.m. Nobody won.The race is held at Frozen Head State Park, just outside of Petros, Tennessee. Each year, 40 competitors are selected to compete in the 100-mile ultra marathon.This year, Canadian Gary Robbins did the best. Of the 40 competitors, only four runners made it to the third loop, with Robbins coming up short, 12 minutes past the 36 hour cutoff time. He was tapped out.While the total race time is 60 hours, runners are given 12 hours to finish each loop. One second late and you’re done. Along with Robbins, Guillaume Calmettes, and Ally Beaven, started loop three.This is the second time since 2007 that no runner has finished the race.Read more over at Runners World.Photo by Josh Pattonlast_img read more

17Dec/20

Recovering card losses after third-party breaches

first_img continue reading » Payment card data breaches, in which credit and/or debit card information is stolen from a third-party, have been occurring at an alarming frequency the last several years. According to the non-profit Identity Theft Resource Center, the number of data breaches in the United States alone increased from approximately 200 in 2005 to more than 1,300 in 2017.Each of these incidents can affect tens (if not hundreds) of millions of consumers. For example, Target reported that a 2013 breach of its systems compromised more than 40 million payment cards. A data breach reported by Home Depot the next year affected approximately 56 million cards. More recently, Equifax acknowledged in 2017 that a data breach exposed highly sensitive personally identifiable information for over 145.5 million people.But while consumers are often the focus of media attention surrounding payment card data breaches, it is the financial institutions that issued the affected payment cards who bear the brunt of the harm. Credit unions have been at the forefront of recent litigation to recover these costs, bringing class actions against the merchants whose allegedly lax security controls resulted in payment card information being stolen. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

16Oct/20

GO-TIME: Electronic Bidding Lowers Cost of DEP Construction Contracts

first_img June 20, 2017 Efficiency,  Environment,  GO-TIME,  Innovation,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA –  The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has decreased the cost of construction projects and improved efficiency for contractors with the launch of an electronic bidding site for construction contracts, the department’s newest GO-TIME initiative.“Developing an online tool to accept and process construction contracts continues our agency-wide efforts to increase efficiency and save money,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Not only have staff time and material costs been reduced, but bidding has become more competitive, bringing down the average cost of awarded construction contracts.”DEP seeks bids for about 50 contracts annually for construction related to abandoned mine reclamation, acid mine drainage, surface mine reclamation, cleaning and plugging oil and gas wells, waterways engineering, hazardous site remediation, removal and disposal of underground storage tanks, and wetland restoration.As more vendors see contracts online, the number of bids per project has increased from an average of 6.12 to 7.23. The increased competition has decreased the average bid amount per project and therefore the average awarded contract amount. In addition, staff time and material cost savings of approximately $36,000 per year have been achieved.Vendors enjoy time-saving, partially auto-populated forms, which help reduce errors that can cause rejection, and an e-bonding option when bid bonds are required. In addition, an email notification system alerts vendors of any addenda to contracts, so they can adjust their bid promptly.Templates lessen the time staff spend preparing and issuing contract documents and solicitations. As just one example, staff typically checked each bid manually for math; the electronic system now checks math automatically.The e-bidding site uses the third-party BidExpress system. Electronic bidding supports the Governor’s Office of Transformation, Innovation, Management and Efficiency (GO-TIME), which works with state entities to modernize government operations to reduce costs and improve services. State agencies already saved over $156 million last fiscal year and Governor Wolf challenged GO-TIME to build upon this success by achieving $500 million in savings by 2020.Construction e-bidding is part of a recent technology upgrade campaign at DEP that includes a mobile app that’s made DEP inspections of oil and gas sites more efficient and an electronic permit application that speeds up the permit process for surface coal mine operators. Location-based data on everything from air quality to water pollution can be found on the new DEP GIS Open Data Portal, and the public can quickly access oil and gas data through the online Oil and Gas Annual Report and public review tool for operator documents. Historical oil and gas well location is also going online, starting with Allegheny County. DEP will launch more electronic upgrades in coming months.To learn more about GO-TIME, visit https://www.governor.pa.gov/go-time/. GO-TIME: Electronic Bidding Lowers Cost of DEP Construction Contractscenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

06Oct/20

Auctioneer Haesley Cush has auctioned many unusual items over the years but never one of these

first_imgAuctioneer Haesley Cush thought he had auctioned every before — until now. AAP Image/Claudia Baxter.I have auctioned some amazing stuff over the years. Some great homes, some amazing experiences for charities, beautiful pieces of art and artefacts from around a the world.Regularly people ask, “What’s the craziest thing you’ve been asked to auction?”.But yesterday I received a call from my dear friend, Diane O’Reilly, who asked if I could do an auction at the ‘Mother of Boys Lunch’ next Friday 11th May.She is emceeing the event with Kylie Lang and they’re are raising money for the Red Rose Foundation.As I was checking my diary, I casually asked her “What are we selling?”.There was a pause.“Well Haesley you’ve probably not done one of these before” she said“Try me,” I jeered condescendingly.More from newsNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Parks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours ago“We are auctioning off a vaginal rejuvenation treatment”. Long pause.“You’re right” I replied after what seemed like an inappropriate amount of time.“What is that?”.Diane went on to explain the amazing work conducted by Brisbane gynaecologist, Rod Allen. She went to great lengths to explain that the procedure was ideal for many woman, that it was not cosmetic and it was a highly in demand procedure that could be life changing for may women.After her pep talk and knowing I would have a room full of captive women. I flicked through the diary to ensure I could recite my new insights in modern magical medicine.Unfortunately I will be overseas!!But in true Mothers of Boys spirit Diane jumped straight on the phone and my good mate Peter Bergin, from Place Estate Agents will be wielding his gavel over what I can honestly say is the most surprising prize I have ever seen on an auction catalogue.last_img read more

28Sep/20

EU Goes from 12.6GW to 15.8GW of Offshore Wind in One Year

first_imgEurope added close to 3.2GW of offshore wind capacity last year, taking the total installed and grid-connected capacity from 12.6GW in 2016 to 15.8GW at the end of 2017 and thus marking a 25% increase in just one year. Including sites with partial grid connection, there are now 92 offshore wind farms in eleven European countries and 4,149 grid-connected wind turbines, WindEurope reports in its annual offshore wind statistics. Illustration; Photo: Ole Jørgen Bratland/ Statoil (archive)The UK is first with 43% of all grid-connected turbines, followed by Germany (28%), Denmark (12%), the Netherlands (9%) and Belgium (6%), representing the top five markets. Combined, the top five countries represent 98% of all grid-connected turbines in Europe.Fourteen projects were completed in 2017, including the first floating offshore wind farm, with the UK and Germany leading the way in new installations last year by adding 1.7GW and 1.3GW, respectively.Work is currently underway on further eleven projects, also in Germany and the UK. Once completed, these projects will add a further 2.9GW and bring the cumulative capacity in Europe to 18.7GW. By 2020, offshore wind is projected to grow to a total installed capacity of 25GW, WindEurope states.Giles Dickson, WindEurope CEO, said: “A 25% increase in one year is spectacular. Offshore wind is now a mainstream part of the power system. And the costs have fallen rapidly. Investing in offshore wind today costs no more than in conventional power generation. It just shows Europe’s ready to embrace a much higher renewables target for 2030. 35% is easily achievable. Not least now that floating offshore wind farms are also coming on line.”The average size of installed offshore wind turbine in 2017 was 5.9MW, a 23% increase on 2016. The average size of the grid-connected offshore wind farms in 2017 was 493MW, 34% higher than the previous year.last_img read more

24Sep/20

Chukwueze’s impact reflected in Villarreal’s win  against Azeez’s Granada

first_img The Yellow Submarine have won all their games since the Spanish top-flight resumed after its suspension due to the coronavirus outbreak in Spain and across the world. Villarreal started with a 1-0 win against Celta Vigo at Abanca-Balaidos before recording the same scoreline against Mallorca on Tuesday, with Chukwueze playing a key role in the outings. Against Granada, the Nigeria international started from the bench along with his compatriot Azeez, who plies his trade for the Nazaries. The Yellow Submarine hit the ground running with Gerard Moreno opening the scoring as early as the 11th-minute after he was set up by Ruben Pena, which proved to be the decisive goal in the encounter. In an effort to ensure his side secures a comfortable lead, manager Javier Calleja brought on Chukwueze for Javier Ontiveros in the 65th minute. The Super Eagles winger had a 67% successful pass rate, won one aerial contest in the encounter and made one tackle in an effort to help his side maintain their lead. He was, however, shown a yellow card after he tackled his compatriot Azeez, who was introduced in the 61st-minute, from behind. Samuel Chukwueze helped Villarreal chinch a 1-0 victory against Ramon Azeez’s Granada in Friday’s La Liga game at Estadio Nuevo Los Carmenes. Loading…center_img Azeez, on the other hand, had a 77% successful pass rate in the game and had two shots, with one hitting the target, but his effort was not enough to help his side avoid defeat at home. With the result, Villarreal are seventh on the league table with 47 points from 30 games while Granada are ninth with 42 points from the same number of matches. While Chukwueze will hope to help his side continue their winning form when they face Sevilla, Azeez will look forward to playing a key role as Granada aim to bounce back against Leganes, who will be expected to parade two Super Eagles stars in Kenneth Omeruo and Awaziem Chidozie on June 22. Chukwueze has been a key member of the Nigeria national team since making his debut for the West Africans in 2019. The forward, who has 13 caps for the Super Eagles, was part of Gernot Rohr’s team that finished third at the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations in Egypt. read also:Villarreal hold on to Chukwueze’s magic touch against Granada Azeez, meanwhile, only recently returned to the national team after a five-year absence and has six caps for the side. The duo will hope to keep on with their consistent performances in the Spanish top-flight in order to continue playing key roles for the Super Eagles. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

23Sep/20

July 16 is deadline for 2017 point fund eligibility

first_imgVINTON, Iowa – All drivers competing at sanctioned events are required to purchase licenses to make themselves eligible for the benefits of IMCA membership.Those who have not yet purchased a 2017 license are affecting their eligibility to receive point fund shares.While licenses will be sold through the Duel In The Desert at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in November, drivers who fail to buy a license by Sunday, July 16 will not receive point fund money, or plaques and jackets should they be the top driver in state or track point standings.Licenses can be purchased by calling the IMCA home office at 319 472-2201.last_img read more

21Sep/20

Liverpool reject Suarez bid

first_imgLiverpool have rejected a bid from Arsenal for Luis Suarez and remain steadfast in their insistence the striker is not for sale. Press Association Press Association Sport understands the Gunners made an offer in the region of £30million for the Uruguay international last week which was rejected out of hand by the Reds. Despite the 26-year-old this summer voicing his dislike of his treatment by the English media and suggesting a move to Real Madrid would appeal, the club have no intention of selling, a stance which was not even tested by an offer well below what is considered Suarez’s true value. center_img Suarez, who has three years remaining on an improved contract he signed last summer, is currently on extended leave after his involvement in the Confederations Cup. Neither he nor his representatives have spoken to Liverpool about any intention to ask for a move but his comments while on international duty in South America have left the club in a difficult position. It was expected any approach from Madrid would come after the end of the Confederations Cup but so far has nothing has materialised and the fear is the Spanish giants will leave it late in the window in order to drive the price down. Arsenal’s surprise bid may have been more strategic than realistic as they are currently trying to push through a deal to sign Real striker Gonzalo Higuain. Making an offer for Suarez may have just been a ploy intended to focus the minds of Bernabeu officials on signing off the Higuain move. Suarez is not due back for pre-season until July 22 and he will then be expected to join the club’s tour matches in Australia and Thailand. last_img read more